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Ask Winke
Sights and Rests

  • Jim from MO asks:
    Multiple Mounting Holes-- I've been Bow Hunt'n for years & I'm wondering, "What is the Purpose of the Multiple Mounting Holes" on All the New Sights for the last 15 Yrs. or so? What do they GAIN YOU? Thanks! Jim
    Winke Responds:
    Jim, I am not sure why they do it on hunting sights. It is really like splitting hairs. I know why they do it on target sights - because it can make a difference. I guess they do it to give the savviest customers some options. In theory, moving the sight away from your eye will have three affects: it will make the circle of the pin guard smaller so it will fit inside your peep easier if you are aiming that way. Second, it will show movements in your bow arm more easily (the further the sight is from your bow, the more it will exaggerate any movement of the bow across the target). Third, it will allow you to widen your pin gaps (distance between the pins). All that being said, I always put my sights at the shortest setting because I want to protect my sight from branches, fences, brush, etc. when walking and when pulling it into the tree. The further it sticks out the more likely it is it be damaged. I may not be a savvy archer, but I feel that I am accurate enough for whitetail hunting as long as I practice hard a couple months leading up to the season. Good luck and have a great day. (1-3-14)
  • Luke from MI asks:
    I am thinking about buying the fuse helix micro five pin sight for my bow. First, do you think this is a good sight for whitetail hunting. Second, what would you set the five pins for if my maximum effective range is 30 yards, but I'd like to shoot farther for practice. I really enjoy the show, and reading your articles. Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, I have not shot that sight yet, but it looks like a good one. I have been using the Carbon Interceptor but that is no longer available. If 30 is going be your maximum, I think I would set the pins for 20, 30, 40 and slide the other two down to the bottom until you need them. Once you get good at 40 yards, I would then sight in the fourth pin for 50. And again, keep practicing until you get good at 50 and then set a 60 yard pin. By keeping them out of the sight picture until you actually need them you reduce the chance for confusion when aiming. If you think you will never practice or shoot past 40 yards I would just go with a 3 pin sight to keep things simple. Good luck. (12-3-13)
  • Luke from MI asks:
    Is the Spot Hogg Bullet Proof a good sight for whitetail hunting. I am 14 years old and shoot a diamond Razor Edge at around 54 pounds. I have a 3 pin $30 sight and am looking to upgrade to a 4-5 pin nicer sights. My biggest concerns are accuracy and durability. I also looked at the Spot Hogg Right On and Real Deal, along with other types of sights, but they seem a little expensive. Do you think the Bullet Proof is a accurate enough sight( I'm looking for a simple adjustment and no fancy stuff) and what are some other accurate and durable sights? I really appreciate your answer and enjoy this web sight and your many helpful articles. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, Yes, it looks like a good choice to me. I have shot Spot Hogg in the past. I like the stuff I am using now. The Fuse Carbon Inrterceptor is what I have on my bow right now but Fuse no longer offers that one. You might be able to find them though. Their new Helix sights look good but the Profire is less expensive and is plenty solid for whitetail hunting. Accuracy is really not an issue with a sight assuming the pins and adjustments lock solidly in place. I am always more interested in durabilty, visibility of the pins and reliability in sight than I am in accuracy. If I can hold the bow steady, the sight will do its part. Good luck. (11-26-13)
  • Bill from PA asks:
    After recent injuries to my elbow and wrist, I was forced to put lighter limbs on my bow and now I am shooting about 54 lbs. of draw weight. Is it better to have a specific 25 yard pin or just put the vitals between the 20 and 30 yard pin when you have a 25 yard shot. Thanks and keep up the good work
    Winke Responds:
    Bill, I think if you are shooting over about 260 fps, it is probably better just to split the pins for the 25 yard shot. At slower speeds you can likely be more accurate with a separate pin. This is no hard and fast rule, but the slower arrow does make for a wide gap and you lose accuracy the wider the gap gets. Happy Thanksgiving. (11-26-13)
  • Bill from FL asks:
    On the speed chart. I don't have a 20yd. pin. Will a 25yd and a 45yd pin work the same way. thanks Bill
    Winke Responds:
    Bill, It would probably be pretty close, but you can also figure out where to hold your 25 yard pin to hit right on at 20 and then aim the same way at 40 to measure the drop. Good luck. (9-2-13)
  • Ryan from NY asks:
    I am purchasing a new rest Monday, but im on a budget. Im 14, using the diamond razor edge at 45lbs. I used to be using a octane hostage arrow rest but after 3 years my arrows are slipping out of the bristles. I am looking at a NAP apache but im not sure how it will work with a bow like mine at low weight, or do you think a whisker biscuit would be better? I visit this website every day and enjoy watching the videos, cant wait for the action to pick up. Thanks in advance.
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, I would keep it simple for now. The Whisker Bisquit is very simple, accurate enough and affordable. Of the options, that is the one I would recommend for you. I like the Fuse Ultra Rest, but it costs a fair bit more than the WB. I appreciate your support of the shows. I hope you have a great day. (8-25-13)
  • Brian from MI asks:
    Hi Bill, I was wondering why most sights have horizontal pins rather than vertical pins. I shoot with a vertical fixed pin sight but there are not many companies that make these anymore. Is there an advantage to a horizontal pin sight that causes most companies to manufacture these? With a vertical pin sight I feel like I can see more of the animal. Just curious on your thoughts, good luck this season. Thank-you
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I am not sure why that caught on. Trophy Ridge originally made a business out of offering a vertical pin sight and it took off well for awhile. I think the biggest issue is the challenge of moving just a single pin up and down. Not as easy with a vertical pin sight. That may be why horizontal pin sights own the market. They are very simple and easy to make. Trophy Ridge still makes a few vertical pin sights in their V5 series. Good luck. (8-16-13)
  • orvil marsee from KY asks:
    will you do a segment talking about peep size and peep rotation? How do you use a peep sight like you do without a D loop
    Winke Responds:
    Orvil, Early this season I am going to put a bow together and that might be a good time to do that. I use a 1/4 inch diameter Meta Peep. I like the visibility and then I center my entire pin guard, not just the individual pin. I have never used rubber tubing and never (rarely) used a D-loop. My method is simple. Shoot the bow with the peep in it for a dozen or more shots and then start adding 1/2 twists to the string until the peep comes back correctly. Today's strings are pretty stable, so once set, they rarely change much even year to year. But if they do, I just add 1/2 twists again until the peep is back on track. Sometimes I have to give it a small turn after nocking an arrow to get the peep squared up. If it is squared up before drawing, it will be squared up at full draw - again, one of the qualities of today's good strings. I have done it for so long that I never even think about it anymore. It is automatic. It was much harder to get one of those old Fast Flight strings to square up everytime because they creeped so much. Good luck. (8-16-13)
  • Steven from MN asks:
    I know you are a fan of fixed pin sights. What do you set your pins at? How many pins do you have on your sight?
    Winke Responds:
    Steven, I use five pins set for 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60. I practice a lot at 70 too, but I just use my 60 yard pin and hold high. You can get pretty close by holding the bow up at full draw, placing the 60 yard pin on the target, seeing where the 50 yard pin is pointing and then moving the 60 yard pin up to that spot. That will get you in the ballpark on the 70 yard shots using the 60 yard pin. Practicing at long range helps you to be more accurate on the normal shots you take when hunting. Good luck. (5-6-13)
  • shawn from WI asks:
    hi. bill i was wondering what you use for a sight 1 pin vertical or a multipel pin sight.all i here from my hunting buddies is vertical 1 pin. just was wonder what the pros and cons are and if ones better then the other. thank you. boy i cant wait for bow hunting my buddies tell me you are a bow hunting freak. what can i say i love too bow hunt.recently put my7 year old daughter into the joads program bow shooting.and joined a bow hunting club she has a dead eye shes out shoots the class of 30 kids from 7 years old too 16.thanks again bill too you and your staff for another great season and me and my daughter are looking forward too you 2013 season.keep up the good work.
    Winke Responds:
    Shawn, I like multiple pins because I don't want to have to think about where to hold the pin if the deer moves after I come to full draw using a single pin sight. With multiple pins, I can just switch pins easily as the deer moves and keep aiming dead on. Tell your daughter congrats from me on her shooting success. That is awesome. Thanks for the support. (4-12-13)
  • Nicholas from AL asks:
    What arrow rest do you use and would recomend for me? im buying the 2013 hoyt spyder 34
    Winke Responds:
    Nicholas, I love the Ultra Rest from Fuse. That is the one I have on my bow. Good luck. (4-12-13)
  • Eric from NY asks:
    I'm trying to decide which arrowrest to go with for my Hoyt Vector 32. The Whisker Biscuit or Trophy Ridge Revolution Micro adjust. I'm kinda leaning towards the biscuit because I like how solid it feels in the rest. But the revolution is a nice rest too very quiet
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, I am sure both will work fine, but I have to admit that I am a simpler-is-better kind of guy and that Whisker Biscuit is about as simple as it gets. Of those two specific rests, I personally would lean toward the Biscuit. Just know that it will be hard on your arrow's fletchings. Coupled with short fletchings like the Blazer or NAP QuikSpin it will be fine. Good luck. (1-24-13)
  • Cody from NC asks:
    Hey Bill, I just got a Spyder 30 a couple of weeks ago and I have it shooting a hair under 300 fps. Problem I am having is my 20 and 30 yard pins are extremely close together and I don't like it. I am use to 20,30,40,... yard pins so I am not sure how to set up my 5 pin sight (fuse carbon interceptor). Should I go 25,40,50,60,70? What is your pin setup and how fast are you shooting?
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, I am shooting over 300 fps (I would guess 310 or so). I have five pins set for 20-60 in ten yard increments. My 20 and 30 just barely work as the 20 and 40 pins are touching (offset two track pin system) on the Carbon Interceptor. I am not worried that they are close together. I guess it never crossed my mind. I only care that they are hitting the right place. Your other proposed option 25, 40, 50, 60, 70 will work. The 25 will be a few inches low at 30 (not a problem-better low than high), but it will be good for 15 through 30 without a lot of adjustments on animal - aiming dead on. Under 15, you may have to aim a touch low with that pin. Personally, I would stick with 20,30,40,50,60 unless you just can't physically get them close enough for proper sight-in. Good luck. (1-24-13)
  • Robert from NY asks:
    Just gots into archery, my kids bought me a PSE Stinger 3G RTH bow.It came with a whisker biscuit rest and a 3 pin Gemini sight on it. The whisker biscuit was tearing up my fletchings so the guy at the pro shop suggested I put on a QAD Utra drop away rest . The rest with installation cost me a100$ which I thought was reasonable . But I just saw a great deal on a Spot Hog Real Deal 5 pin sight and I was thinking of buying it. Is my bow , because it was in expensive in the world of bows, worth upgrading and spendinging the money?
    Winke Responds:
    Robert, Sure, because some day you will bump up to a top of the line bow (probably) and your upgraded accessories will be ready to make the jump with you saving the money of having to buy them later. People change bows on average about every three to four years and the sight and rest you talk about are good enough that they will still be doing just fine at that time. Good luck. (1-14-13)
  • Mark from MI asks:
    Bill - Congrats on getting the DG4. Can't wait to see the program next week. Quick question regarding sights. I hunt a ground blind and during low light (e.g. first light/last light) I have a hard time picking up my pins. Can you recommend a sight that performs well in low light situations? Thanks Mark
    Winke Responds:
    Mark, Thanks. I don't think there is one. I think you have to use a light to make that work. I use the Fuse Interceptor and it is very bright outside during all legal times, but it drops off to nothing with 30 minutes of shooting light left in the blind. I cobbled a light onto it and that helped, but to do it right, I should have just bought one of the Fuse Sight lights. I would go that route, if legal in MI (I can't remember if it is or not - I think it is). Short of adding the light you will always be looking at black pins. Good luck. (11-8-12)
  • Torrey from NY asks:
    I need a economical 3 pin sight, I was hoping for one made of all metal. This year my truglo carbon xs has been working fantastic however at some point it must have gotten hit and moved my shots 6". Now im slightly paranoid and have to shoot before all hunts which can be tough. What should I buy?
    Winke Responds:
    Torrey, You probably realize that Fuse is one of our sponsors and makes bow sights. I love their products and use them, but they don't make a true low end model. Their stuff is all high end and the new ProFire sight for 2013 looks like a solid winner. However, I don't believe it is at dealers yet. For the most affordable sights I think I would look at Cobra for starters. They may not be the fanciest, but they should be a solid value. Good luck. (10-21-12)
  • Steven from OK asks:
    Hello, I'm trying to change my QAD Ultra Hunter from an old AR34, onto my new backup bow, which is an 08 Bowtech Commander. Normally this would be a piece of cake but the brace height on the Commander is much longer, forcing me to replace the draw cord because said drawcord had been trimmed after being fitted on the old bow. Where do I start and what size cord will I need ? Thanks, Steven
    Winke Responds:
    Steven, The easiest thing to use is the same cord used for making string nocking loops. Most archery shops have that stuff sitting around or you can probablyl order a short piece of it from some online retailer by searching for it under "bowstring nocking loop cord". I would just go to the hardware store and buy thin string. Be sure to get the strong stuff and sized right - the nocking loop cord will work fine. Good luck. (10-15-12)
  • Jeremy from GA asks:
    Bill, Congrats on the great youth season. Me and my two boys are getting ready for our youth opener in Georgia this Saturday. What type of rest did your son use for his shot on the big eight? It looked really steady and versatile. Thanks in advance. Jeremy
    Winke Responds:
    Jeremy, It was a Reatlreee EZ Hanger screwed all the way into the tree so that it was really tight. They are designed for this, but it did work well for Drew's hunt. Good luck this weekend to all three of you. (10-9-12)
  • James from FL asks:
    Bill, what is the difference between the Fuse Ultra rest and Interceptor sight as opposed to the Hoyt Ultra rest and carbon sight? They look the same. I'm purchasing a new Element this week and my pro shop guy is a very knowledgeable guy and says that the Hoyt rest should fit better. I know Fuse is owned by Hoyt, so what is the difference?
    Winke Responds:
    James, They may be the same. They both come from the same machining center. They should both fit the bow just fine. Fuse is designed to fit a wider selection of bows, I think, with the addition of a spacer that goes on Hoyt bows. That may be the only difference. Good luck with the Element, you will love it. (9-13-12)
  • bob from NJ asks:
    my new G5 1/4 tubeless peep won't stay centered at full draw. How do I correct this? shooting the new Legion by bear, 65lb pull, 28 in. draw, also note I att. release directly to string (feels more natural when at anchor) my grouping is sick, only because I tied a piece of tubing to left side of string at split to stop rotation of peep.
    Winke Responds:
    Bob, To get the peep to turn perfectly, you have to use a bow press and take one end of the string off, add a twist or two and put it back. By trial and error you will soon arrive at the perfect position for the string so that the peep comes back dead square each time. Good luck. (9-12-12)
  • dave from NY asks:
    I am in my second yr of shooting a bow with a 31 inch axle to axle with a 7 1/4 brace height. The bow is very comfortable to shoot , very quite, good speed with a very comfortable let off with a solid wall. My shortest bow before this was 33.5 inches. I love shooting this bow from 0 to 60. The only downfall that I am having is that in a low light 3d coarse I am having trouble seeing the target. I am using a G5 1/4 inch peep. I have NO ISSUES in normal light. Am I having this issue due to the increase string angle due to the axle to axle measurement ? I hate changing anything this close to the season opener but would a change of going to A 5/16 peep help ? I am open to suggestions. Thanks .
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, Probably. The peep is a bit farther away from your eye making it act as if it is smaller. I don't think the change to the 5/16 inch peep will hurt you even at this stage - it should allow more light in and improve visibility. If you are used to centering the entire pin guard, you shouldn't see any difference in accuracy. Also, keep in mind that with the heavy canopy of leaves right now, the woods are very dark at last light. Some of the most challenging visibility I have ever faced was when 3-D shooting, not hunting. When the leaves fall, the woods will be more visible as more light will get in. Good luck.
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi bill I was wondering if u put something on the shelf of the bow so the drop away rest gets silenced. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I put the adhesive backed foam that people use to weatherize windows or doors on my rest shelf if the rest is hitting. You can get it at most hardware stores. Sometimes you can also adjust the rest itself (depending on brand) to keep it from dropping that low. Good luck. (8-27-12)
  • Mike from NJ asks:
    Bill, Just wondering why you personally don't shoot a single pin sight. I know you like to keep things simple. Is it because you would have to move the sight to the correct yardage as the deer is coming in. I am thinking of going this route to get rid of the cluter of various pins, maybe I will be able to see better using only 1 pin? Also where did you get the bow mounted windchecker you had on your bow in the idiot proof bow segment.
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, If you can guarantee me that no deer will move after I range them and draw my bow I will start using them! I think you see my point now. I am sure the single pin sights are more accurate at distances that would otherwise be between my pins, but if the animal is moving toward me or away from me, I don't want to have to wait to adjust the pin before drawing. I want to get the string back early and be ready for the first good shot. I don't feel I can do that with confidence when I have only a single pin. Each of us comes to our conclusions about what makes for an idiot-proof bow setup, that is just my idea. It may not be best for everyone, but my strategies are usually very conservative. I think Knight and Hale sold that windchecker. I don't believe they still sell them. It is pretty cool isn't it? I think I would give the bow away begore I gave the wind checker away! Good luck. (8-26-12)
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    hi bill, I was wonder how do you keep the fall away rest from making noise when it hits the shelf? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, You can put some adhesive backed foam on the rest shelf under the rest. It is the same stuff used to insulate a window or a door, etc. A thin layer will silence most fall-away rests. Possibly you have some in the home or a friend has a small piece you can borrow and not have to buy a roll just to get a few inches of it. Good luck. (8-24-12)
  • Steve from MA asks:
    I have hunted primarily in Mass. and Vermont for all of my hunting life. I have finally booked a bowhunting trip for Illinois for next year and can't wait. Getting consistent with a bow has been guite chore as I shoot right handed but am left eye dominant. For hunting here I practice at 40 yards in knowing most of the shots I will get will be 30 yards or less. I'm thinking that I need to increase my practice range out to 50 yards with the focus being proficient at 40 yards in for the Illinois hunt. I'm also looking at getting a new sight for my bow "Martin Pantera" and was looking at the new IQ bowsight. I'd appreciate your thoughts. Thank You!! PS love your columns they all just make so much sense. Steve
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, Thanks for the support. I would think that being proficient at 40 is a good idea. Many Midwest hunts include food plots or open field edges and the chances for a shot of that length is definitely real. The IQ Sight looks like a good product. I have not used it but I do understand the concept and used a product back in the early 90s from Timberline Archery called the No-Peep that was similar and it worked well to show you when you were torquing the bow. Good luck. (7-14-12)
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, what do you think about the black gold sights or would the spot hog right-on be a better choice? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I think they are both good sights. Both have bright, well-protected pins (the most important factors). I have used both and I would say you will be happy with either one. Go with what you can afford and what looks good to you. Good luck. (7-11-12)
  • Andy from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, im going to get a bow soon that comes R.A.K. and i dont care for the arrow rest that comes with it. i would prefer to have a drop away. What brands do you recommend?? preferably between a price range of $80 and maybe $120 Any suggestions??
    Winke Responds:
    Andy, I have been using the Drop-Away from Fuse. I really like it. I am not sure the exact price range on that one, but they are selling those through Hoyt dealers. They will fit any bow, not just Hoyt. What I like about these rests is the fact that they completely hold the arrow without any extra bells and whistles until you are ready to shoot. No worry that the arrow will fall off the rest prior to the shot. Good luck. (7-1-12)
  • Jacob from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, with your recent questions on sights, I have one too. In the new cabelas, there are these sights made by IQ bowsights that have this technology of Retina Lock where it tells you if you have any torque or anything while at full draw. I was wondering if you have ever tested this sight, or if it really works. It states it will increase your range by 20+ yards as well. Thanks Bill and God Bless!!!!
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, The technology works. To say it will increase your range by 20 yards assumes a lot and is really just a marketing claim. There are too many other factors at play when it comes to accuracy to make a claim like that. However, the technology does work. It will likely make you more accurate if you have a tendency to torque your bow. You will learn a lot about your shooting right away. This is not new actually, there was a product on the market back in the early 90s called the No Peep from Timberline Archery that did basically the same thing in a different way. Good luck. (6-28-12)
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, Wondering which sight you would recommend out of these two. G5 XR2 vs Spot-Hogg hunter. Which one would you consider better.
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I am sure they are both good, but you may find that both are overkill unless you are planning to hunt something more demanding than whitetails. For example, I think the simpler Spot-Hogg Right On is all you need for most bowhunting and it is a good bit cheaper. If you will be taking lots of longer up and downhill shots (like western hunters) having the 3rd axis adjustment of the Hunter would be useful, but if you are only hunting whitetails and flatland species such as antelope, you won't see the big benefit that comes with 3rd axis adjustment. I have never been a huge fan of moveable pin sights for deer hunting, though the two moveable pins might make an interesting combination. It just seems to complicate things. If you have a 30 yard shot, use the 30 yard pin. If you have a 35 yard shot, hold between the 30 and 40. If the deer is walking toward you or away from you you don't have to worry that you have the sight adjusted wrong. Just use the correct pin once he stops or offers a shot. I think they are both great companies. Personally, of your options I would go with the Spot-Hogg Right On (which technically wasn't one of your options). I am using the Fuse Carbon Interceptor with five pins (green, red, green, red, green). Good luck. (6-28-12)
  • micheal from MN asks:
    Hi bill, I am having trouble being consistent with fixed pin sights, i was wondering if i should try a hha one movable pin sight. Are they a good sight? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Michael, I have not shot them but from what everyone says, they are good sights. That would be a good option if you want to go that route. I don't know that a single moveable pin will make you more consistent, however. I think that comes down to your shooting form. A moveable pin may make you more accurate at between ranges (like 34 yards) than fixed pins at specific distances (because you can hold dead-on with the single moveable pin sight). Good luck. (6-27-12)
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, what do you think of the spot hogg hunter five pin sight .019 size pins. Do you think the pins are to small for low light or just right? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I like the .029 for my top two pins and then the smaller sizes for the lower (longer distance pins). Some of today's fibers are very bright though and you can by with the .019 pins on top. You just have to take a look at them in low light to know for sure. Personally, I do like the bigger pins on top. Good luck. (6-15-12)
  • Tim from NC asks:
    Bill, I'm a lifetime whitetail hunter who just moved to Utah from the East Coast. I'm interested in your take on sight setups for western game vs. for whitetails. I had great success with a 3-pin setup for whitetails (20, 40, and 50 yds). I shoot a fast bow so my arrows only drop 2 1/2" from 20 to 30 yds. I'm considering going to a moveable pin sight for longer shots at muleys and elk. My hesitation is that I don't want to have to readjust the sight if I have a quick, unexpected shot or if I draw and then the animal walks 5 or 10 yards. I also don't want 7 fixed pins to deal with under pressure. What do you think of sights like the Tommy Hogg that offer multiple pins (set for the closer ranges) and let you dial the bottom pin out to longer ranges as needed? Would this also be helpful for whitetail hunters wanting to practice at longer ranges? Thanks for your time. Your articles and now the website have been a huge help over the past 20 years.
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, I agree with you on that sight. G5 has one also, very similar concept. The other option is to put a small five five sight head on a moveable carriage and then keep it set to the top setting (lowest range), where the 20 yard pin is set to 20 yards. Then if you have time you can move the carriage until the 20 yard pin is set for the exact distance of longer shots. That is not as foolproof (or idiot-proof) as having a sight with a moveable bottom pin, but it might be another option to consider. I appreciate your support. Best of luck out there in Utah! (6-13-12)
  • jacob from AR asks:
    Bill, I was reading the article on how to extend max shooting range by 10 yards. I have a 3 pin sight for 20, 25, and 30. Do I need to change to a 5 pin sight or stretch my pin out farther? I'm 13 and shoot about 45-50lbs. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, If you don't want to change your spacing, I would add a pin. More than likely the manufacturer of your sight offers single pins you can add to the sight. I would just do that, or possibly add two of them. That would give you enough pins to stretch five or ten yards at your current spacing. Eventually, as your speed increases you can stretch out the distance betwen pins and go 20, 30, 40, 50 or 60 with the fifth pin. While you may not take long shots at game for several more years, you can use the longer pins for practicing at longer distances. That will really improve your skills at the shorter distances where you will plan to take your shots while hunting. I often practice at 70 and even 80 yards even though I almost never shoot much past 40 to 50 yards. (It would take a perfect set of conditions for me to take a 50 yard shot at a whitetail. They just move too much.) Good luck. (6-13-12)
  • Joe from PA asks:
    Hi Bill I shoot my bow with a peep site and I love it but I do not like the rubber tubinh attached to the peep is there a style I can use without the tubing if so what do you suggest.Thanks for your time and have a great summer.
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, I have never used rubber tubing in my life. All you can really do if you want to get rid of it is to train your string so it comes back correctly each tiime. That means that if it is not coming back square, you have to remove one end of the string and add half twists to the string until it does. That means you will need a bow press or take it to an archery shop for help. With today's modern strings, they will usually hold this position for at least a hunting season. If your string keeps turning, you may need a different string. We use strings from Fuse. They make them to fit other bows besides Hoyt. Good luck. (5-31-12)
  • Andrew from MI asks:
    hey Bill, Can't wait for august! Things are looking great here in Central Michigan, have a great buck on camera alreaddy! My question has to do with peep sights, I have never shot one in 20 years. I started out instinctive, killed several deer like that. when i went to a sight pin I used a kisser button, the tip of my nose and my sight pin. I have always had extremely good accuracy like this. In the woods in low light situations I have no need of worrying about low light situations because I am letting a pin float over a deer without struggling to look through a peep. Whats the advantage of a peep sight? Have you ever shot without one? why did you choose to shoot with a peep? Thanks in advance! hope you guys are getting rain! Andrew
    Winke Responds:
    Andrew, If you are shooting accurately, I would not change. Typically, for most people, the peep locks them into an anchor and eye to pin relationship more precisely than the kisser and tip of the nose system. That was the case for me too. I shoot better with the peep, but if you are already shooting accurately, I would not change to a peep. Thanks for the support. (5-31-12)
  • John from IN asks:
    Hey Bill, Do you shoot Carbon Express Arrows? If you do, which one do you shoot, and would you recommend them? Also, what are your thoughts about drop away rests? I've been shooting a whisker biscuit for years, but I'm thinking about switching to the drop away made by trophy ridge. Thanks for producing the show. It's awesome!
    Winke Responds:
    John, I have shot them in the past. I am not shooting them right now. I think they are good arrows. I wouldn't hesitate to buy them. I love drop-away rests. I only use them because they make tuning with small diameter arrows much easier. I personally use the Fuse Drop Away. I think the Whisker Biscuit is a good rest too, but I do think that the drop-away rests improve the fletching life because they don't have to contact the rest on every shot. Both are good choices. Personally, I like the drop-away better. Good luck and thanks for the support. (4-11-12)
  • Jarrod from IA asks:
    Hey Bill, I have a couple questions here. First off, what do you think about the qad ultrarest hdx? I am thinking of getting it and don't want to spend 150 bucks on a piece of junk. Second off, what is a good lighted nock? I know a guy who had them and he didn't have any luck and I think it would be nice to see your arrow all the way to its destination. Thanks, Jarrod
    Winke Responds:
    Jarrod, I have not tried that rest, but I have used the Fuse version of the rest and it has worked well for me. My guess is that it is a good rest, but if in doubt, try the Fuse version. I have not used many lighted nocks, but like your friend, the ones I have tried didn't work well. I am guessing that Easton's is pretty good. I have heard a lot about the Firenock but I have never tried it. Of course, you have the Lumenock that has been around for a long time. I am sorry that I just don't have better experience to help you on this one. Good luck. (4-11-12)
  • James from MN asks:
    Hey Bill, what's your thoughts on peep size? Mainly for hunting, but I also enjoy shooting long distances at the bow range. Do you know of a low weight brand (as to not slow arrow speed)? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    James, I like big peeps (1/4 inch) and then I frame the entire round pin guard within the fringe of the peep rather than trying to center a single pin. That keeps precision with the larger peep. I like the large peep because I have more field of view for moving shots and also because it lets more light in for low light shots. I use the G5 Meta Peep and it is pretty darn lightweight. I would recommend that. Good luck. (3-29-12)
  • Todd from MS asks:
    Great job Bill. Thanks for what you do. I don't forsee a situation where I would shoot at a deer over 40 yards, but I would like to practice beyond 40. Is there a sight on the market that lets me shoot one pin out to 40 and an adjustable pin for yardage over 40? I shoot a Mathews Switchback currently, but will upgrade to the new Helium this summer. Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Todd, I don't think you will get one pin accuracy to 40, but you can learn to hold high. I think if you set a single pin for 25 yards you can hold hold dead on for shots from about 12 to 32 yards (roughly) with a fast bow, but beyond that, obviously you will need to shoot high. If you are looking for sight with both fixed and moveable pins, there is only on the market that I am aware of, and that is the sight from G5 Outdoors. You can look them up on their site. Personally, in your situation, I might be tempted to set up a three pin sight but even a single-pin moveable pin sight like many companies make does have some benefits when practicing because you still have just one pin but you can dial it whereever you want it. Good luck. (3-26-12)
  • Sam from WI asks:
    Hi Bill, Just a question regarding offseason bow shooting to keep sharp. When I practice indoors in winter I usually just lay my bow in the case while open when I am done shooting. Sometimes when I come back the next time, it is shooting good groups left of bullseye consistently which is easily fixed with a simple turn of an allen wrench and an adjustment of my bow rest. I have a whisker biscuit rest and no matter how hard I tighten it down, it always seems to move off kilter again and again. I know it's a simple solution but I was wondering if you knew what was causing this? Thanks, Sam P.S. Your last offseason show about swirling winds blew my mind! I have never had something make so much sense. And here I thought that that phenomenon was as random as lightening strikes. THANKS AGAIN!!
    Winke Responds:
    Sam, If the rest is moving, it has to be vibration. That is always a problem and worse if you shoot light arrows. I would put some temporary Loc-Tite thread lock on that screw and see if that helps. Another thing that people need to know when shooting indoors versus outdoors is the light and how it changes the "shape" of your peep opening. That can really affect where you hit. I have to resight my bows to shoot indoors if I do much of that because of the changes in the light angle. I realize that is not what you are referring to, but thought it was worth mentioning just for fun. Good luck. (3-20-12)
  • Larry from MO asks:
    Bill, First just wanted to thank you for your show. By far, the most informative out there. I dont miss an episode. I also follow your website. I have a question regarding the Easton Axis N-Fuse vs. the Full Metal Jacket. i am using for whitetail. I'm torn on which to use. I will be shooting a Heli-m at 62-65#, 28.5" draw. I wont be shooting far.....30-35 yds with a single pin HHA sight. Will the FMJ make a great difference in drop at that distance? I love the idea of the greater penetration with FMJ but didnt know if would be an issue since using one pin. sight. I assume an adjustment may be necessary but trying to determine if is too much and just stick with the Axis N-Fuse. Thanks for your help!
    Winke Responds:
    Larry, I think that N-Fuse is a great arrow and I would likely stick with that when deciding between those two arrows. A single pin should probably be set for 25 yards and then you should be good from about 15 to 32 yards (with most arrow speeds). You will have to hold a few inches low on the closer shots, but setting it at 25 yards will give you the most margin for error if you misjudge the range. Good luck. (3-15-12)
  • Matthew from OK asks:
    Hey Bill, great job on the show! One could only dream of become such a passionate deer hunter such as yourslef. I had a couple questions. The rubber connecter from my peep sight broke off. Is it worth trying to fix myself? And I had an idea for you. You get swamped with so many questions on this site. Why not have Greg Clements or another one of your pro staff share the load? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, I appreciate all the support. Thanks very much. You can fix that easily yourself. Just don't make it too short or it will be so tight it will try to pull off all the time and break before its time. Make it short enough that it turns the peep nicely in the last few inches of the draw. I like the way you think regarding the questions. Unfortunately, all of those guys are very busy too, and I have the most experience. I have literally interviewed thousands (not exaggerating) people in the hunting world over the years so I have a unique perspective given this exposure to so many experts. I will keep doing it for as long as I can. I am sure I will have to do something different with this at some point. Thanks for the support. (3-11-12)
  • Tracy from IA asks:
    Hi Bill, just a quick question for you. I am in the market for a new bow sight, and I was wondering if you had any experience with tool-less sights, if they are as good as advertised, and if you know of a good model for under $100? Thanks, Tracy
    Winke Responds:
    Tracy, I have basically used just two models of sights in the past several years: Spot-Hogg and Fuse. I have used these models because they are rugged and the pins are visible. Fuse is now one of our sponsors so I use their sights exclusively now, but I wouldn't be doing it if I didn't believe in them. I don't want to have to use something every day in the field if it doesn't work well. There is too much at stake. So please check out the Fuse sights when shopping. The Fuse Interceptor and Carbon Interceptor Micro-Adjust models are more or less tool-less, (you just need something to snug the thumb screws down when you are finished adjusting) but I think it sells for closer to $120 to $150 depending on the model. One cool feature is the fact that you can get the sight with an optional larger fiber pin for the top pin for ultimate visibility for close range shots at the extremes of legal shooting time on dark days. Good luck. (2-27-12)
  • David from TX asks:
    Bill how far from the arrow rest should the broadhead be ? I shoot a Ripcord. Keep up the great work! DK
    Winke Responds:
    David, As long as the bow has a solid back wall, I would say, pull into the wall and give yourself about 1/2 inch in front of the rest and then mark the arrow for cutoff. If it has a soft wall, hit your normal anchor and add an inch to allow for the softer wall. Good luck. (2-26-12)
  • James from IA asks:
    Hey Bill, I was thinking of getting a new peep sight. Just wondering on what size you would recommend? Thanks for your time.
    Winke Responds:
    James, I like big peeps so I can get a lot of light through. That will mean that your pins will be quite blurry when aiming (you have a shallow depth of field with a big peep). However, I have learned to aim that way and it doesn't bother me one bit. I let the pins blur and focus on the spot. My peep is 1/4 inch diameter, if that helps. Good luck. (2-20-12)
  • John from PA asks:
    Bill I noticed you use reading glasses. I to am at that age where things are blurry up close. I have a problem with my pins blurring and inlarging to the point that past 30 yards they cover most of the target. I switched to a clarifier peep and that helps but with some limitations. Could you recomend a scope or aimpoint sights for archery equipment. And will they be practical.
    Winke Responds:
    John, I am not a big fan of scopes or aimpoint sights for bowhunting. You will have to move them for every shot and the aimpoint, being a tube, requires that it pivot slightly too in order to stay in line with your sight path. They make brackets for the Aimpoint, but I am still thinking it is not the ultimate solution. Let me ask how far you feel that you need to shoot? You will have a hard time getting good shots past 40 yards and that is a tough shot on a whitetail because they are always moving and can even jump the string on the shot. My limiting factor in accuracy is not the sight picture, but my ability to hold the bow relatively steady as I squeeze the trigger. I just let the pin blur and focus on keeping the center of the blurry dot on the center of the kill area or aiming point if it is a target. It is accurate enough for me to shoot decent to 60 yards and beyond. At 40, it is no problem at all. You can always drop down to a .019 diameter pin if the one you are using is larger. My advice is to get used to aimning with the blurry pin and you will be just fine at all reasonable bowhunting distances.
  • Jarrod from IA asks:
    Hey Bill, I have a question on form/peep sight. When I get the bow back I have to close one eye to look through my peep and see the pins. When I watch other shooters they shoot with both eyes open and say it improves accuracy. I try to do it but i can't focus enough to see the pin ( I wear glasses if that makes a difference) Is my form wrong? What are your preferences?
    Winke Responds:
    Jarrod, Not sure on your particular situation. In general, I would say shutting one eye to get a consistent sight picture is the best strategy. Consistency is the key to archery. I squint my non-dominant (left) eye in order to make it less apt to influence the sight picture while still offering some field of view, but I have done that for at least ten years so I am used to it. Anytime you change anything, it takes many hours of repetition until it becomes instinctive. I would not want to make a change to the way I aim that might not work if done wrong without a lot of proactice. Shutting the non-dominant eye will work every time. Squinting it will only work if you do it the same exact way each time - making it a riskier approach. I hope that helps. (2-8-12)
  • Sean from IA asks:
    I believe the upside down peep the viewer is talking about would be the string splitter. I believe Jay Gregory did a segment recently on a show where he instructed how he installed a string splitter upside down and it acted much like the rear sight on a gun. Thanks for all your hard work Bill!
    Winke Responds:
    Sean, Got it. Thanks Sean. See, I don't get out much! (12-8-11)
  • Patrick from KY asks:
    Hi Bill, On one of your recent episodes you did a tech spot on installing your peep sight. I believe you explained installing it upside down so as to provide a better sight jpicture of your entire sight. I am unable to locate that "Tech spot" pon the web sight. Could you please direct me to the correct episode or explain it to me in an email? Type of sight used and the installation. Thank you for providing such a great show and resource. Patrick
    Winke Responds:
    Patrick, I don't think that was me that wrote that. It doesn't ring a bell. I have even thought about something like that so I am sure I didn't talk about it. Sorry, that wasn't me. There is no upside down with the peeps I use. They are round and angled. If you installed the kind I use upside down you wouldn't be able to see through it. Good luck. (12-6-11)
  • John from PA asks:
    Bill like some of your other followers I to have a problem with my sight pins blurring because of poor close range vision. I recently had a clarafier peep installed and instantly I shot better than I have in years. The peep magnifies your sight pins without distorting your long range sight picture. But just days ago I found out the hard way that they have some shortcommings. On cold days if your breath comes in contact with the lense on the peep it will fog much like the lense on a scope. Also if the sun is at just the right angle behind you as you draw down on a deer it will glare and distroy your sight picture. I'm sure rain and snow will be a factor as well. I thought of wiping the lense with anti fog and going with a larger peep with a hood. Do you have any advice for us hunters with short range sight problems? (Note we can see the sight pins but they become blurred and inlarged and this makes it difficult to accurately place your pins.) Also I seem to shoot more accurate by squi
    Winke Responds:
    John, I have the same problem. Part of this is due to the fact that I use a large 3/8 inch peep sight. Larger peeps are great for visibility but produce a very short depth of field when looking through them. Small peeps help but obviously limit light transmission and visibility. Your lens concept might be the best of both worlds. I just let the pin blur and focus on the target. I am guessing that for pure target accuracy I am giving up something, but for hunting it works fine. I don't mind the blurry pin. However, your situation may be even worse than mine. I need to use reading glasses to read, but at arm's length my eyes focus fine. I would try the larger peep (with lens) with the hood to see what happens. My guess is that you will like it much better. I think the antifog wipes will also help. Let us know what you find out. Good luck. (11-23-11)
  • Chad from MO asks:
    this is just an observation, Bill, but I was suffering some accuracy issues with my Katera. The light bulb came on; I went out and bought a bigger peep, going from a 1/4 to 5/16". Due to the shorter ata of the bow, the peep was smaller and i wasn't getting a good sight picture. I went to the larger peep and accuracy has increased, to where I am able to get the entire sight guard in my peep, just like I did with my longer ata bows. you might want to pass this along for all the people that shoot short bows.
    Winke Responds:
    Chad, Good point. I appreciate the input. Good luck this season.
  • Tracy from IA asks:
    Hi Bill, hope you don't mind, but I like to help people with their questions whenever I can, and I have a comment for the guy asking about painting his peep. I paint my peep with Liquid Paper before every season, or as needed, and it does make a significant difference in low-light shooting. I can get away with using a smaller, more accurate peep if I have it painted, I've found you can actually shoot later (or earlier) than with a non-painted peep that's larger, as that white circle really stands out in dim light. I'm sure there's a better product for painting it than the liquid paper, but it's cheap and handy, and works good. Tracy
    Winke Responds:
    Tracy, Interesting. Thanks Tracy. I never thought of it that way. I was only thinking in terms of light transmission. I appreciate the information and help. Have a great day.
  • Sam from WI asks:
    Hi Bill love the show. Could i paint my peep white to aid in low light shooting? Sam
    Winke Responds:
    Sam, You can try. You may get some benefit from reflected light, but truthfully, I doubt it will help much. Main thing is pin brightness and peep diameter. Large peep opening and bright pins (without being so bright they blind you to the target) are ideal for low light shooting. Good luck.
  • Andrew from MN asks:
    Bill, love the show, my wife and I have been followers since your first semi live post! My question for you is, can a dovetail or extended arm sight make me more accurate? I understand the concept of getting perfect peep to sight-housing encompass-meant, is there much more benefit? During the off season I have found fun in shooting longer ranges and experimenting different set ups. But before I go and buy a $250 sight I would like to know the advantages. I have done some research and can't get a clear answer, maybe you could help and suggest a sight. Thank you greatly for your time.
    Winke Responds:
    Andrew, Moving the sight farther out makes for finer aiming (the pin moves more when you move the bow a small amount) if you are good at holding a bow steady. If you are not super steady at full draw, I would not opt for the extended sight arm. Unless you are going to compete, I would stick with hunting sights. I have seen some amazing accuracy from guys using hunting sights at even long ranges. I actually shot against Randy Ulmer (sort of - he blew me away) in a 100 yard broadhead competition using hunting bows. He was holding four inch groups pretty routinely. I was probably holding about 1 foot groups, maybe just a bit bigger at times. I thought I was shootig good until I looked at his target with the bullseye stuffed full of arrows! Good luck.
  • Eric from IN asks:
    Hey Bill Hope all is well. Wondered what your thoughts were on the IQ bowsight?
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, It makes a lot of sense. There was a similar product on the market in the early 90s called the Timberline No-Peep that worked good for the same things (giving feedback on bow torque). I would not use the IQ instead of a peep sight though. I feel you still need the peep. Good luck.
  • Ed from IN asks:
    Bill; Read your book on setting up hunting bow; learned alot. Thanks. Question-How does one best resolve eyeglasses interfering with peep sight use. I use a clarifier in peep but have to hunt with glasses off. Thanx. Ed
    Winke Responds:
    Ed, You might try some of the solutions that eliminate the peep. The IQ sight might be a good choice for you. I am not sure it is as good at locking in an anchor point as a peep sight, but it does offer a second reference for your eye alignment. I would at least try one in the shop some time to see if it works for you. Otherwise, my dad (who has poor eyesight) uses very large peeps and eye glasses and then centers the round pin guard in the peep for precision. He makes his own peeps and has made some as big as 3/8 inch. Personally, I think 1/4 inch big enough for most situations. Good luck.
  • James from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, I was wonderin if you have had any experience with sights that have a couple fixed pins and one "floater" pin to dial in the yardage? Do they work, are they loud and can you recommmend any brands? Oh as far as string silencers, do you prefer string leeches or whiskers as far as ability to silence and not sacrafice speed...? Thanks Bill. Looking forward watching the shows start up in in August!
    Winke Responds:
    James, The best one I have seen that has the function is from G5 Outdoors. It is not loud at all and works well. I like the string leeches. They work well and are not too heavy on the string. Good luck.
  • Pat from TX asks:
    Bill, when I first started archery hunting, I used a Whisker Bisquit rest. But, for the past few years, I've been using a popular fall away rest. Even though I like the fall away rest, I've been thinking about going back to a full capture rest simply because somewhere along the way I've adopted and firmly believe in the K.I.S.S. philosophy. I believe the fewer moving parts you have to deal with, the less often Murphy's Law will come into play. I've always heard that you are giving up f.p.s. when using a full capture rest. Even though I have a chronograph, I never tested arrow speeds with the different style rests. What are the pros and cons of the different style rests and do you lose significant arrow speed with a full capture rest like the Whisker Bisquit? Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Pat, I would not worry about a few fps. You will never notice them. That is much less important than having a simple, idiot-proof hunting. I use a drop-away (Ultra from Fuse) and I am confident in that rest, but there is not much out there simpler than the Whisker Biscuit. The only real negative to the Biscuit (outside of vane damage) is the fact that your arrow is attached to the bow (under its influence) a bit longer with the rest because even after it slips off the string, it still has to go through the bristles. So if someone has rough form, the arrow will be moved off line just a bit more because of the fact that it is under the bow's influence longer. It is a minor point, but a legitimate consideration. If you felt like you were accurate enough with the Biscuit, I see no reason not to return to it. Good luck.
  • colin from FL asks:
    hey im 15 i shoot the pse bowmadness xs, at 26 inch draw with a 60 pound draw weight. i currently have a whisker biscuit but its starting to get worn down and instead of replacing it im thinking about upgrading to a drop away, any suggestions?
    Winke Responds:
    Colin, PSE makes some good drop-aways, but I have been using a Fuse model made by QAD. The launchers lock up until you hit full draw so the arrow can't ever fall off the rest. It is a great model. Check that rest out. I think you'll like it. Good luck.
  • Wes from IN asks:
    Best hunting show there is! I noticed in your last shooting tip that you didnt have your peep tied in. Is this something you typically do or recommend? Do you have any problems with the peep not turning the same? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Wes, Once I get the string turned right, I don't have many peep problems. It takes a bit of shooting (a dozen shots maybe) to settle the string and then I just twist it a turn or two until the peep is where it needs to be. It was not served because I just hadn't gotten to it yet. I just set that bow up a few weeks ago and just hadn't set everything on it yet. Have a great Easter.
  • Jordan from IN asks:
    Mr. Winke, Hi i am Jordan Leach from Madison Indiana and i love to bow hunt. But i have heard bad things about whisker biscuits. I shoot with a whisker biscuit and i was just wondering what you prefer and what the best kind of rest is for your bow.
    Winke Responds:
    Jordan, I like drop-away rests. I am shooting the Fuse Ultra and think it is a very good rest. I think the Whisker Biscuit is a fine rest. I would not bash it, but it has some weaknesses and some strengths (like all rests). You can always experiment to see if another rest is more accurate, but I wouldn't switch just because of what you are hearing. Have a great Easter.
  • Martin Bruder from MN asks:
    I have had multiple problems with several drop away rest over the last two years, I have decided to go to a Whisker Biscuit..I shoot a Z7, will I be giving up consistancy or speed. Many of my friends think I'm crazy..I am shooting great with it up to 50yrds. What can I tell my hunting buddys that will shut them up? I have been hunting for 30+ years and shot over 100 deer with my bow...they all think I am going backwards with the WB..I think its so simple that it's a no brainer...Please tell me if I should try the fuse drop away and why or why not?
    Winke Responds:
    Martin, You may not have to tell them anything if you keep shooting that well. I remember when Chance Beaubouf (a great target shooter) was on the Whisker Biscuit bandwagon. That was before he was discovered and no one was paying him a dime. He loved it. The only downside to the Biscuit is that the bow has contact with the arrow for a bit longer and thus if your shooting form is rough, you have a few more milliseconds in which to influence - damage - the shot. Practice enough to maintain great shooting form and you won't see a difference. I like the Fuse Ultra drop-away. It is what I am shooting and what I reccomend to people looking for a drop away, but there is nothing wrong with the Biscuit that I have not already mentioned. I would not tell you to switch if you are shooting the Biscuit well.
  • tim from IL asks:
    what sight, release,and stabilizer do you like with your new hoyt set up?
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, I am using the Fuse Pilot G-Series Five pin sight (I like basic sights), a Scott caliper release, Fuse Ultra Rest drop away and the new Fuse Blade stabilizer (short version). It is a very nice set up.
  • Mike from ON asks:
    What is (in your opinion) the best arrow rest on the market today? I am absolutely fanatical about a quiet draw. I have always loved a whisker biscuit for hunting, but since I don't really get opportunities to use as many products as a guy like you, I was wondering what else I might be missing out on.
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, There is nothing wrong with the Whisker Biscuit. Many bowhunters use them - 100s of thousands probably! I like drop-away ressts. I am using the Fuse Ultra Rest right now and love it. It holds the arrow 100%, is quiet and gets out of the way of my arrows nicely. Like I said, hard to beat that simple design. Good luck.
  • Jack from KY asks:
    As I get older my vision is getting worse, especially during low light conditions. What bow sight do you recommend that has larger pins or could otherwise help us old guys out?
    Winke Responds:
    Jack, Most companies offer the .029 inch diameter fiber pins as an option. Standard, most sights come with .019 fiber pins so you have to ask for them specifically. That is what I do by the way. Be sure to get a sight with a wrapped or spooled fiber optic pin so it is very bright. Good luck.
  • Perry from IL asks:
    Im lookimg for a four pin sight what would u recamend for me?
    Winke Responds:
    Perry, I am shooting a Fuse. They have bright pins and have held up well for me though I bounce it through a lot of branches! I don't think they sell a four-pin but you might be able to order it or just use a five pin and drop the bottom pin out of the sight picture. Disclaimer: Fuse is a sponsor, but I do believe in their products. Good luck.
  • Matt from OH asks:
    Bill,I have questtion and most people i know don't know how to answer so im gonna ask you.I have a HHA adjustable and shoot very well with it and my bow is a hoyt turbohawk with all fuse assessories but the sight i just want your oppinion on is it really better to have a fixed pin sight when hunting whitetails the reason im asking is i have drawn on a deer and its at 20 yards but it runs out to thirty thats the problem i have with the adjustable sight im looking at the fuse pilot M series sight 5 pin .019 pins would that be a smart decision to switch to that sight?I love your show doing a great job!!!!!!
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I would (and do) use a fixed-pin sight for whitetails for just the reason you describe. Also, I draw early sometimes and the deer will change direction a couple of times as he comes by the stand, having multiple pins is very nice when things change unexpectedly as they often do with rutting bucks. The only other option is to use a three-pin body on a moveable carriage and then you can leave it set for the short range setting, using the pins for 20, 30 and 40 yards, for example. If you have time to move the pins, you can then use the adjustments to move the top pin to the exact range of the shot (such as when a deer is feeding in a food plot or otherwise stationary). Call HHA to see if they have such a solution or can recommend one. Good luck.
  • Mike from IL asks:
    I think I read somewhere that you have a 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 yard pin. Can you tell us what diameter pins you have for each pin. Do you have .29, .19, or .10, or do you have it mixed going smaller for your longer distance pins? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I shoot all .29, but it makes sense to have at least the 50 and 60 be .19. I can just see the .29 better in low light, but I don't take long shots in low light anyway so smaller pins on the last two pins would be a better setup. Good luck.
  • Luke from MA asks:
    Let me first say that the show is great! I just discovered it and I wish I discovered it earlier. It is also great to see someone with your influence with a strong christian faith. Now my question. I just installed a 1/4" meta peep on my 70# Bow Madness, and the string seems to be rotating a slight bit when I draw. What is the best way to combat this? I also installed string leeches, and dont know if they are working for, or against the peep. Thank you for your time. God bless you and your family.
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, Thanks for your support. Once the string has settled (after about 100 shots) you can use a bow press or Bowmaster mini press to remove the tension on the string and twist the string to bring the peep back correctly. Typically, the peep will turn about 3/4 of a turn for every twist of the string (assuming you twist the string in the direction of the existing spiral twist). Just add combinations of twists until the peep comes back perfectly square. Don't be too worried about where it starts, only where it ends. Also, you may need to make sure you have found the manufactured center of the string with the peep. PSE marks this center with a paper tab. If you have missed the center, the peep will turn much more than it would if you hit the center. You may want to experiment with this, as well. You should get this worked out easily. Good luck.
  • Bill from OT asks:
    I'm shooting a Redhead Toxik with wisker biscut rest and I'm having clearence issuses when shooting blazers. How can I fix this?
    Winke Responds:
    Bill, Depends on where they are hitting. If they are hitting the cables, you can rotate the nocks so the vanes are not pointing straight at the harnesses. If they are hitting the riser, I would say the bow may not be correctly center shot. I have messed with that bow and it seemed to offer sufficient clearance to me, so it may be a setting issue. Bowtech makes that bow so it is not as if it is being produced by a company that doesn't know what they are doing. Beyond that, I would need more information about what the fletchiings are hitting to be able to help you.
  • Dan from MN asks:
    Mr. Winke, I'm addicted to your awesome shows! A few quick questions for you: what are the pros of both a drop-away and a stationary rest? What do you think of the drop-away rests that are limb driven such as Vaportrail's? What brands do you recommend for a rest? Thanks and good luck this season.
    Winke Responds:
    Dan, I appreciate the support. If you go back a few days in the "Most Recent" you will find a place where I answered the first part of your question. I'll direct you there saving me some time. The second part: I have not tried the Vaportrail but the concept makes good sense. They have the potential to respond quicker to the shot than those that are spring driven. This may or may not be necessary. I know it is ideal for a rest to support the arrow as long as possible before suddenly dropping away to clear the fletching. If they can be timed to support the arrow a bit longer before clearing, they definitely serve a good purpose. I am using the Fuse drop-away right now. It is a good rest. There are also others on the market and any rest made by a reputable company will be fine. There has been quite a bit of study done to arrow flight, so most of them should work fine. Good luck to you too.
  • Dan from WI asks:
    what are the advantages of both a dropaway rest and a stationary rest?
    Winke Responds:
    Dan, There are really only two kinds of rests I would consider using if I was using a mechanical release (a dropaway and a full capture rest). The full capture rests are like the Whisker Biscuit that hold the arrow entirely so it can't fall off the rest. The fall away, when timed correctly (just follow the directions) will move out of the way before the fletchings get to the rest. The full capture rest (like the Biscuit) makes contact equally on all fletchings at the same time, which in effect, equalizes the contact to all sides of the arrow so it doesn't get kicked off line. Both will work fine for most bowhunters. I personally prefer the drop away because I like the idea that the rest is not making any contact with the arrow once it has moved forward a few inches. (It takes that long to overcome the inertia and get the rest dropping down). The full capture is ideal for hunters who never want to worry about whether their arrow is in the right place when they hit full draw. Both will work well for you. Good luck.
  • Paul from AL asks:
    Hi Bill, First i'd like to tell you how much I enjoy the show,some of the new episodes are already getting me pumped to get in the stand on Oct.15th!Have a quick question, just put a single pin sight on my bow to try to help with my usual three pins being so close together and not seeing much of the target.I will probably set the pin for 20 and aim a bit high for 30/35 and a touch low for 10.Have you ever shot a single pin and how did you have it set? thank you for your time and good luck this season!
    Winke Responds:
    Paul, Thanks for your support. I have done that and from the standpoint of playing the odds (the greatest margin for error on misjudged shot disntances) you have to set it for 25 yards. That requires the least amount of hold over or hold under (largest range of vital hits) versus any other sight in distance. Good luck.
  • Anthony Giordano from MI asks:
    I have a drop-away rest and my arrows are kicking out to the left. What could be some of the reasons/solutions for this? God Bless
    Winke Responds:
    Anthony, Your rest may not be positioned correctly to line the string up with the shaft causing the string to push the arrow slightly sideways. Try moving the rest in and out to see how much difference this makes - if any. Another reason this occurs is harder to fix. If your cams are not perfecly lined up with the string (in other words, they lean) throughout the shot, it is likely that your your string will move sideways as it moves forward. This generally causes some real tuning issues as you can't simply adjust the cam angle like you can other aspects of the bow's tune. This is why I always sight down the string when looking at a new bow to make sure the cams line up with the string at brace and then ask someone else to check them out when I am at full draw. If the cams are aligned with the string at brace and at full draw, there is a much better chance the bow will tune easily. Theres is still the issue of vertical nock travel that you can't ignore, but eliminating horizontal nock travel from the puzzle certainly makes bow tuning much easier. Other than that, the only other thing that can cause your arrows to fly tail left is arrow stiffness. If the arrows are not stiff enough, this may occur.
  • Matthew from AK asks:
    Sorry, I sent you an email yesterday. After thinking about it, I dont know what I was trying to say. Here it goes again. I have a drop away arrow rest on my PSE bow that was installed by a pro shop that is a very trustworthy shop. After the installation of the rest I shot about 10-15 arrows at the pro shop to make sure that everything was ok. At the time everything appeared to be ok. I have sinced changed duty stations and am in Spain. Dont speak enough spanish to have a pro shop look at it here. After letting my bow sit about 3 months in its case, due to some work related traveling, I started target practicing in my backyard. I was using new arrows that have never been shot before. After about 20 shots, I noticed that the vanes are touching the arrow rest, I think? Is this normal? If not what can I do to fix this issue? Or, is it something else? string, cable, sight, etc. ? Once again, sorry if the last question caused confusion and maybe more questions. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, When a bow sits for a long time, especially in hot sun, for example, the string can creep longer. That may be what happened. That might be causing the nock point to be too low (if it is a single-cam bow). That might cause the arrow to come out tail low allowing the fletching to strike the rest. If it is a two cam bow or a hybrid cam bow, the nock point will move up slightly if the string stretches. If you don't think that is the case, it is probably the way the nocks are rotated. By rotating the nocks, you change (turn) the way the arrow sits on the rest. This affects the way the fletchings are oriented compared to the rest and the cables. In some orientations, one of the fletchings may be hitting the rest or the cable. Try turning the nocks a little at a time until you find a rotation where the fletchings pass cleaning over the rest and miss the cables. If that doesn't fix the problem, you have some kind of an initial adjustment problem. The rest is not set up right. If that is the case, you will need to move the rest in or (probably) out to get the arrow lined up with the center of the string. I can't imagine why the fletching would hit the cable unless the cable guard is not turned correctly (the old style cable guard rods were adjustable) or the rest is too close to the riser or the rest is turned such that one of the fletchings is pointing straight at the cables and makes contact. I hope that helps.
  • Matthew from AK asks:
    Bill, can I call you Bill? I recently bought a drop away rest. The local pro-shop set it up for me. After the initial set-up my arrows were not making contact with the rest. After taking it home to practice in my yard it seems that my arrows are making contact with rest. Is this normal? If not, what can be done to fix it? Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, Without seeing it, I would guess that the cord has slipped where it is attached to the harness. If this is not done right it will slip. The cord needs to be threaded through the harness and then served tightly into place to prevent slippage. You can test it by tugging on the cord to see if it slides. If it does, that would be my guess. Otherwise, I can't think of anything else that is likely to change unless you are using different arrows and the nocks aren't rotated the same as the ones used in the shop to test it. You can still get fletching contact even with a drop-away rest if the nocks aren't rotated in such a way that the fletchings clear the rest.
  • joe from NY asks:
    hi im joe and im 12 years old and i LOVE hunting its my favorite thing to do im obsessed with hunting.my dad bought a new bow and it came with a peep sight and he hates peep sights.do you use a peep sight?and whts the differance?by the way i love your shows they rule from joe
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, Thanks for watching the shows. I do use a peep sight and recommend them to everyone. They are like the rear sight on a rifle - they just make you more consistent. I definitely don't want to be disrespectful to your dad, but you definitely need a peep sight.
  • Sam from WI asks:
    Bill, thanks for the show and your advice. I just got my bow back from getting paper tuned at the local pro shop but now the fletching is hitting my cable gaurd will it hurt to move my rest a 1/8 inch to the side. thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Sam, I am not sure on that, but you can sure find out by giving it a try. You may be able to turn the nock and change the orientation of the fletching so they miss the cables. That works fine with most drop away rests and with most full-capture rests like the Whisker Biscuit. Also, some cable guards are adjustable, so you might be able to move the harnesses away from the arrow slightly. There are several ways to tell if a bow is center shot. I think you can find a video I did on that subject in the "How To" section of the video player. There is a lot of information in there. If you end up checking the center shot and the bow is way off, you may want to talk with the pro about it and see if there is a reason why the rest is too close to the riser. Good luck.
  • Elwin from ME asks:
    Hey there I was just wondering If u have seen the new IQ bow sight and if u have what do u think about it. Just wondering if it would really help with making groups better and makeing u a better shot. Want more feedback on it before I go and spend 200 bucks on it. Can not wait for the shows to begin. Thanks Elwin
    Winke Responds:
    Elwin, The sight makes a lot of sense. It is not truly a new concept. Timberline Archery had the No-Peep (think it was called) several years ago that essentially did the same thing. It did work. I believe the IQ sight will indeed help you to shoot more consistently. In archery, consistency equals accuracy so it is likely a great choice. If you can afford it, it is worth the money. Good luck and thanks for your support.
  • Kevin from IN asks:
    Hey Bill!, I have looking at bow sights the past few days, and I noticed some have a dovetail mount. The description says its for removal and flexible pin-gap control. I get the removal part, but what about the other. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Kevin, The farther a sight is away from you, the closer the pins effectively appear. Think about it this way. If there are two fence posts six inches apart and you are three inches from the posts, you will see right between them like they aren't even there. As you move back from them, they give the impression, because of your perspective (the angle between your eye and the fence posts), of being closer together. You can't see as much daylight between them. If they are 40 yards away, they may appear almost as if they are a single post with little if any gap between them. That is how that works. By moving them closer, the pins effectively spread out and you have to bring them closer together for the same differential in shot range distance. If the extension arm is short, the 20 and 30 yard pins will be closer together than if the extension bar is longer and the sight body is farther away.
  • Mohammad Ali from MI asks:
    If i use my 3 pins that are 20,30,40 yards cant i shoot at 60 yards.I asked experts and they told me i cant but whats the difference they all look the same?
    Winke Responds:
    You have to move the pins to sight in the bow. It is not setup and ready to go until you do. So you decide which distance you set the pins at. If you set them for 20, 30 and 40 yards, the 40 yard pin will cause you to hit very low at 60 yards. The trajectory of an arrow is quite looping so it is dropping fast past 40 yards. So if you set the bottom pin for 40 yards, you will hit way too low at 60 using that pin. Sure, you can set your pins for any distance you desire. You can set your three pins for 20, 40 and 60 yards if you like, but you will learn quickly that you need to gain considerable skill to shoot accurately at the longer distances. It is better to set those pins for shorter distances until you gain an understanding of how this all works.
  • Mohammad Ali from AL asks:
    sorry winke i didnt get the answer i needed for my question, i was asking which pin do i use when i go hunting, for example when you have a gun isn't there one pin you aim with so which one do i use out of the 3 pins i have, how do i aim with them?
    Winke Responds:
    Mohammad, You use a different pin for each distance. I mentioned sighting them in for various distances. For a 20 yard shot, use the 20 yard pin. It will be the top one. For the longer shots, use the lower pins. I use a peep sight placed in the string as a back sight and would recommend that you do this, as well. You will probably want to close your other eye while aiming so as not to confuse the sight picture. You simply place the pin directly on top of the spot you want to hit and squeeze the release trigger or smoothly let the string go if shooting with fingers. If you miss the spot, you move the sight pins in the sight until you have the bow sighted-in. Hope that helps.
  • Ryan from WI asks:
    What kind of sight do you recommend? How many pins do you think is the way to go. I will have shots up to around 45 yards. Thanks for your help and keep up the good work!
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, Of course, we like the Fuse products - Fuse is our sponsor. But they do make good sights. There are also other good ones on the market too, however. If you are going to set three pins you can probably do well with 20, 30 and 40. You can experiment with 25, 35 and 45. This actually gives you the most forgiveness on range estimation errors, but you will need to remember to hold a bit low on the short shots (under 15 yards). I hope that helps.
  • Mohammad Ali Ridha from MI asks:
    i have three pins on my pinsight these are in order from top to bottom: green, yellow, red so how do i shoot with them, which one do i use to shoot with, am i supposed to use one?
    Winke Responds:
    Mohammad, Set the top one for your shortest sight-in distance. Probably 20 yards. You stand about ten feet from the target, shoot some arrows and then move that top pin until the arrows are hitting roughly where you want them. Move the sight up if the arrows are hitting high. Move it left if the arrows are hitting left. Now move back to 20 yards and spend some time fine-tuning both the pin and your shooting form until both are working together to produce nice accuracy. If you are struggling at 20 yards to hold a tight grouping of arrows, stick with that distance (for both practice and hunting) until you master it. Once mastered, you can move back to 30 yards to set the next pin down. That, of course, will be your 30 yard pin. Any shots at 25 yards you split the difference and aim using the gap between pins or you learn how high to aim above the spot with your 20 yard pin or how low to aim below the spot with your 30 yard pin. As you progress and eventually shots at 30 yards, set the third pin for 40 yards. This process may take you a while as mastering archery is not always a simple matter. With good form and some help, you can progress quickly. Left to yourself, you may struggle. Look for a local club where other archers can help you along with your shooting. Good Luck!
  • Richard from AL asks:
    Bill, Been reading about the Hindsight Products. What do you think of these products?
    Winke Responds:
    Richard, I have not tried that product, but as a category the concept is solid. It makes good sense - a front and rear sight, just like a rifle. If you don't mind the bulk of the sight hanging on your bow, I am sure it will work well. Good luck.
  • James from VT asks:
    Can you please tell me which site you use and why? What about some other good quality sites on the market (preferably 3-pin).
    Winke Responds:
    James, I shoot the Fuse five pin sight. I have the pins set for 20-60 in ten yard increments. They make a good three-pin and another good one at a good price is the Toxonics Solo Trac. Good luck.
  • Raymond from NC asks:
    Have you ever used the whisker biscuit type arrow rest? I have heard some say it messes up the fletching on arrows and others say they havent had any problem with them. I want a simple rest and saw some of the prostaffers have the fuse whisker biscuits? are they ok and will they mess up the fletchings? Thanks Bill and the show is awesome keep up the good work.
    Winke Responds:
    Raymond, I have used them and they do mess up some styles of fletching. The best fletching for the Biscuit is the short Blazer Vanes or the stiff, durable Flex Fletch vanes. There are likely others that work well too, but those are the two I have tried with good success.
  • rich from IL asks:
    On your video opener I noticed you shoot a large peep. How big of hole and why? I used too shoot an 1/8" hole and shoot tight groups, I now shoot 3/16" hole and lost maybe 1/2" on my groups. But at dusk and dawn I have trouble finding my peep. Is that why you shoot a large hole?
    Winke Responds:
    Rich, I shoot the full 1/4 inch diameter G5 Meta peep. I like the wider field of view and greater light delivery. I center my entire pin guard in the peep rather than just one pin. A small peep gives you a greater depth of field (more of the sight picture is in focus - pins and target) but I prefer the greater visibility in low light. My pins are blurry when I aim, but I can still see them well enough. If you want the pins to be clear, you will need to shoot a small peep but then you will struggle in low light.
  • Dave from ND asks:
    Can a finger shooter use a drop away rest?
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I wouldn't reccommend it. I would stick with rests having some side pressure to help stabilize the side to side movements of a finger released arrow.
  • Dave Stanley from ND asks:
    I am a finger shooter, Can a finger shooter use a drop away rest?
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I would not recommend it. Most finger shooters need some kind of side pressure to get their bows to tune because as the string slips off their fingers, it moves slightly to the side and that sets up a side-to-side oscillation of the arrow that is best counteracted with side pressure from the arrow rest. A Whisker Biscuit might work for some finger shooters, but the old-fashioned flipper rest on a cushion plunger is also a time-tested solution.
  • Dean from NJ asks:
    Hi Bill, love the new format and all of the new shows! I have a question on how you set up your sight pins. With all of the new bows and how fast they have gotten, when i tried set up a 20 and 30 yard pin, they are just too close and i cant see the target well. So, i moved it to 25 and 35, still to close. So i am going to move it to 30 and 40 for my first 2 pins. How do you personally set up your pins? Thanks again Bill for all of the time you put into this site and helping people the way your do. Dean
    Winke Responds:
    Dean, I shoot about 290 fps with my setup and I set pins for 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 yards. I don't feel they are too close together for my eye, but maybe I am not shooting as fast as you are. Also, I use sights with a double row of pin slots so I can get them close together. Another option is the way I used to set up back in my early years: 20 yards and 40 yards - just two pins. I then gapped between them for 30 yards and held high or low for other distances. With all the shots I get at 20 yards (and less), I would hate not to have a 20 yard pin.
  • scott from WI asks:
    i shoot a whisker bisket on my renegade elpha 1 i was thinking of going to a drop away rest in your opinion what would the best one be for a good price "money is a little tight these days" or should i just stick with what i have, i hunt out of stands 90% of the time. And hunt walking to my stand the other 10%.
    Winke Responds:
    Scott, There is certainly nothing wrong with just sticking with the Whisker Biscuit. If you want to try a drop-away, most of the better ones are pushing $80 so there is really no really good value there. Cobra makes some less expensive ones and I think New Archer also makes some less expensive drop-aways, but really, the Biscuit will do all you need for the kind of short to mid-range shooting that occurs when whitetail hunting. Good luck. Bill
  • Chad from IA asks:
    Bill,Before I get to my question just wanted to thank you for all that you do for the hunting industry.I have been a huge fan of your articles and enjoy watching your hunts on tv or videos.Huge fan of Midwest Whitetail and looking forward the 09 season.I have a Hoyt Katera that I would like to change from a whisker biscuit to a drop away rest.I am new to the drop away rests.I was wondering if you had any in mind that would be compatible and work well with the Katera? I know Fuse Archery is the main dealer for Hoyt but G5 also has some great rests aswell and one of your sponsors. So its obvious to see im a little confused on what to be in the market for in a good drop away rest.Appreciate your time on my question and keep up the good work on Midwest Whitetail. Thanks Chad
    Winke Responds:
    Chad, Thanks for your support. I really appreciate it. Obviously, we love it for people to use our sponsor's products, but there are also other good rests on the market. I would be lying if I said otherwise. The Fuse drop-away is good. The NAP QuikTune 4000 is also good. The G5 Expert is good. Trophy Taker makes some good dropaways too. I am sure that I have missed a few. Any of those would do a good job on the Hoyt. I look for rests that will hold the arrow well as you draw it. I don't want the arrow popping off the rest when I am drawing. So a widely flared launcher with a good secure self-centering ability (the arrow easily slides to the center on every drawO is the best choice for most of us. Good luck.
  • chris from TN asks:
    Bill,thanks for the fast response on the arrow weight question.I think I will go with carbon express 350 hunters at a 28.5" draw length.I would also like your opinion on arrow rests.I have a trophy taker pronghorn and a vapor trail limb driver. Which one of these would work best on my Alpha max 32?I have read that sometimes the rope that goes to the down cable for the trophy taker can effect cam timing and the limb driver's rope that goes to the top limb worry's me that it might not hold up to well in rough areas that I hunt.This is my first hoyt so I don't know much about the cam 1/2.I trust anything you say about hunting and the technical answers you give.Thanks again for this website and all the articles you have written in the past.I'm a huge fan !
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, Thanks for yours support. I would certainly trust the Trophy Taker. Attaching the cable to the down cable will not affect cam timing as long as you do it correctly, where the rest tops out just before you reach full draw. If it tops out too early, you put undue stress on the rest and the harness. I have not tried the Limb Driver. So I dare not comment on that one. Best of luck to you.