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Scent Elimination

  • Ben from MO asks:
    Bill, First off great job continuing with and improving the website. I've been enjoying it since finding it back in late 08. Love the recent episode looking back at "The good old days". Recently I bought one of your scent suits from Cabelas (thanks for the heads up on the sale). My question is after pulling the trigger how soon do you get out of the suit? After you find the deer? or do you drag it to a spot where scent isn't a concern and then put the suit back in the scentmaster. Also do you wear your harness over or under the suit? Thank you and your staff for all your work.
    Winke Responds:
    Ben, Thanks for your long-term support. I really appreciate it. I try to get out of it as soon as possible. I am not super concerned about getting deer smell or blood on it, but I try not to get all sweated up in it when dragging the deer, etc. I normally don't have to drag them too far as I usually hunt fringes and can normally drive within a short distance of all my stands. If the deer goes aways before dying and ends up in a big valley or deep hole I would go to the truck and change (I keep a pair of field pants in the truck) before driving back as close as possible to start dragging. I wear my harness inside the suit. I make a slit for it out the back. First, I put Duct Tape (Gorilla Tape is pretty awesome stuff) on both sides of the suit (outside and inside) right where the label is in the suit. This will keep the slit from tearing. I then make a slit just barely wider than the harness strap so it seals up tightly around the strap. I have to feed the strap through every time I get to the tree so I can hook it to the Muddy Safeline before climing. That system works pretty well. Good luck. (4-30-14)
  • Matt from TN asks:
    Ive seen youre system of scent control episodes but i was wondering. When getting them out of the package after first buying them. What do you do to those articles of clothing? Do you wash your base layers too?
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I do wash everything when I first get it out of the package. I also hang outside for as long as possible, days at a time if possible. I want to really get everything aired out right away. Good luck. (4-22-14)
  • Ed from IL asks:
    Bill, thanks for sharing your scent less routine. I often forget there is always a cameraman with you. That's a testiment to how well you create these videos. Does your camera man go through the same scent less routine as you? Wouldn't do much good if you don't get busted if he does.
    Winke Responds:
    Ed, He does, but I can't control when he showers and such so I can't ever be 100% sure we are on the same page. When Chad was working for me, he showered in my office before every hunt, but I don't push that anymore - adds time to the routine. For all the other aspects the cammeraman does the same as me. Good luck. (3-29-14)
  • Tom from MO asks:
    My biggest problem is scent control due to the ridges and draws on farm I own. I reviewed some of your methods. Given all the effort you put into scent control, have you had measurable success with whitetails downwind of you and still unable to detect your presence via scent?
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, Yes, when I did all those things and hunted alone. With the cameraman, camera and all the other gear associated with video, it is not as easy. We do improve our success some with the scent control I am sure, but I don't get away with murder like I used to. Good luck. (3-27-14)
  • Ben from OH asks:
    Hi Bill, Thanks for reading my question! Do you have any info about a possible scent suit improvement with Scent Lok? Should I hold out for one or buy the current version on sale? I had one of the current versions but I returned it due to the breath shield being an obstruction while now hunting. It wasn't a big deal and I killed deer with it but I was going to wait for an improvement in that area. I like the suit but I'm just wanting my dollar to go as far as possible because I'm getting married (at least I'm supposed to) and still would like to. You know what I mean. Thank you and keep up the great work. Ps I often enjoy your offseason material more than main season because it really supplies knowledge. Thank you Bill Ben
    Winke Responds:
    Ben, We (myself and Scent-Lok) have not discussed it lately but the plan was to have something for 2015. On the current one, I just fold the breah shield down into the neck of the hood, but I am sure we will address it more specifically with the next version. Again, just to be clear, there will not be anything new this year. I appreciate your support and we enjoy the off-season shows too because we have a blank slate each week to basically talk about anything we feel like. That keeps the shows from becoming too predictable. Have a great day. (3-26-14)
  • Jeff from IL asks:
    I love your website and all the information you give to help everyone try to achieve there hunting goals. I have looked forward to Monday mornings since 2008 just waiting to see that weeks video. My question is still about the boots you wear. I have read all the old questions regarding your boots and just watched this weeks episode. I know that you mention clothing touching the grass as more of a problem than your boots. I certainly am not trying to judge as your trophy wall is certainly more impressive than mine but just learn. It seems to me that the boot laces and leather on the outside of the boot would contain a lot of scent even when you wear gloves to touch them and store them in an open tote in your truck. So if you were strictly talking scent control and not comfort or warmth, do you think rubber boots are more scent free?
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, The question is not do they have some odor, but rather, does that odor offend deer. My feeling is that any oils of manufacturing odors wear off boots rather quickly as you walk in them in creeks, through snow, etc. I think they eventually become more or less odorless on their own. Think about it, as long as you handle them correctly, they are literally airing out every single day they are in use. Again, as long as you aren't adding any new odors regularly, the existing odors will wear off within a few weeks. Let me ask this question: I can't smell my boots when I put my nose up to them but I can smell rubber boots even after years of use - which one is more likely to leave odors behind? Granted, we are still on the subject of what is offensive to deer, so maybe the rubber smell is not offensive and maybe it isn't very volatile (won't rub off easily). Bottom line: I have done this for many years and I don't get busted on open ground, so they aren't smelling the boots. The lace up boots I wear (Cabela's Whitetail Extreme series) are more comfortable to me when walking than rubber and warmer on stand. That is why I like them. I would never tell anyone that they have to do what I do, but if you are looking for a more comfotable alternative to rubber, don't be afraid of the Whitetail Extreme boots. If the deer were smelling my scent on open ground I would stop wearing them. Good luck. (3-25-14)
  • Lekan from WI asks:
    Any chance you could do a show on your updated scent control regimen now that you've partnered with ScentLok? I'd be interested in seeing how it's changed since the "Making Sense of Scents" episode in 2012. Thanks and keep up the great work!
    Winke Responds:
    Lekan, That is a great idea. We will try to add that to the next one. Have a great day. (3-11-14)
  • Matt from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, I have a Millenium tree stand which is like the vantage from Muddy. It uses a bracket and then only one actual stand. I really like since it lets me afford seemingly more stand than I would be able to otherwise. I bring the stand in and out of the woods, but it is too big to put in an bin or anything to keep odors off it. Is the best thing just to spray it with a scent removing spray before carrying it in next? What would you do with a vantage stand?
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, You bring up a good point. It is important to make sure the stand you carry in is scent-free. Spraying is a starting point, but I would try to keep it outside between hunts, if possible, so it doesn't build up any odors. Also, with the Muddy Vantage stand you can remove all the fabric (padding) and leave it behind if you fear it has been contaminated. That is where the scent is going to be really concentrated. It is hard to get a lot of scent molecules to cling to metal surfaces and you should be able to scrub them off. The Millenium has a fabric seat if I am not mistaken, so it would be harder to get it completely scent free short of just leaving it out until after the season. Good luck. (2-23-14)
  • Thomas from MO asks:
    Bill, By employing your creek and ditches tatic on public land,I had a successful year,but i need to move my stand locations due to wind swirl.Can you do anything to help eliminate odor where you have to climb out of the creek ? Would you clear the leaf litter out of a knee high ditch,or leave it natural ? Thanks and continue the great work.P.S. What happened to "Buck Norris"
    Winke Responds:
    Thomas, Don't know about old Buck Norris. I assume he is still out there kicking butt. We hunted his area some but never saw him past the youth season. I am sure we will find him back next year if he is still alive. He was very old (looking) so maybe he is dead. I hope not. On the scent issue: if you are serious about getting in and out without leaving any scent, you can't make contact with anything above boot height. That is what the deer generally smell when they pick up ground scent. So if you can clear all those things your pants brush against, you reduce your ground scent considerably. Basically, anything you touch other than the ground itself will increase your chances of being scented. That is why the route is so important. You try to avoid walking in areas they have to cross in getting within range. Good luck. (2-14-14)
  • Greg from MN asks:
    I bought the Winke Suite last week when it was on sale and it's awesome. The biggest issue I had was deciding what size to get. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I wasn't sure if I should get the XL or XLT. I went with the XL and it's a great fit that leaves room for layers underneath without being too crammed. Hope this helps anyone who is trying to decide what size to get.
    Winke Responds:
    Greg, Thanks for the input. It is always hard to tell people which size to buy in that suit because, as you say, it really comes down to whether you want to layer under it in the late season. have a great day. (1-30-14)
  • Dave from MI asks:
    Bill, Thanks for another great season of episodes last year. I thoroughly enjoyed them and am anxiously awaiting the off season shows. My question has to do with the scent containment suit I recently purchased. I love everything about the suit and believe in the science, however, I hate the placement of the carbon mouth filter. It's in the way and I'd rather not have it there at all. Does your suit have one? I went back and watched some previous episodes and didn't see it on any of yours. Didn't know if you had a different version or cut it off? Thanks in advance
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, My suit has one, but I don't use it. I fold it under. Best of luck and thanks for your support this past year. (1-28-14)
  • Pat from GA asks:
    Bill, I think I remember reading that you had installed and were using an O3 clothes washing system and I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about it. How long have you had it and how's it holding up? Is it expensive to purchase/install/maintain? Is it complicated to install? And finally, would you please provide a link to the O3 system website? Thank you.
    Winke Responds:
    Pat, It is called Pure Wash. I am not 100% sure it works. I would want to see some actual scientific testing to be sure. I have not found any. Why? It is still hooked up (was pretty easy to hook up). I use it everytime I do a load of hunting clothes. You can do a search under Pure Wash. I can't believe the company doesn't have its own website any longer. Not sure why not. They used to. Maybe not a good sign? There are many claims out there that it works great, but I just can't say for sure. Good luck. (1-27-14)
  • Adam from KY asks:
    I am considering buying the Winke scent suit. I plan on some early season bow hunting here in Kentucky so I wanted to check if it would be appropriate in the warmer weather. Just wasn't sure if it was geared more to the extreme cold temps. Thank you for your time and God Bless!
    Winke Responds:
    Adam, It isn't insulated, but if it is warm outside the suit will still be uncomfortable - especially for walking. I wear mine on warm days, but I always walk in with the top tied around my waist and the leg vents open. Then I don't zip it all up until I am thoroughly cooled down in the stand. Good luck. (1-21-14)
  • jason from OH asks:
    Thanks for putting up with my questions. I am always looking for expertise and you are da man. You recently answered my question re Ozonics, "By the way, I have found ways to fool most of the deer most of the time, but it is not a very comfortable way to hunt." Would this be hunting from "underground" or a military grade chemical suit? If needed, you can email me and I can keep secret. HELP! LOL
    Winke Responds:
    Jason, No, for one season I wore a pair of PVC waders and a PVC rain jacket with all the openings duct taped and the hood pulled down tight and duct taped to seal the neck opening. I only carried my bow, no pack. I beat almost all of the the deer almost all of the time. Truly, I can almost say I beat all the deer all the time, it was that effective. But as stated, very uncomfortable to hunt in. Have a great day. (1-11-14)
  • Rich from OH asks:
    Bill, Just a question on the scent containment suit from cabelas. I see they have 2 versions available, the suit and the coveralls. The pics look like they're both coveralls but the description of "coveralls" is only listed in one. Also, the other difference I noticed is the coverall one appears to be available in Talls. Any thoughts before I order, thanks?
    Winke Responds:
    Rich, They are the same product. It is just that one of them is a size tall. Good luck. (1-9-14)
  • Tim from OH asks:
    I started using your scent suit the first year it came out. When cabelas discontinued it I bought a number of suits because I didn't want to be without it. It is extremely effective and without question the best system out there.is the new suit cabelas is carrying now going to continue or will they discontinue this one as well?i saw they are about half price of what they used to be and was afraid they may be discontinuing it again. If they are I want to get more before they are gone.also are there any new versions of the suit coming out? Thanks for coming out with a great scent suit.
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, Thanks. I thought so too. I wore mine (I had three of them) every time on stand for 9 seasons! My gut tells me that Cabela's will discontinue this one too. I don't think it has been selling really well. if I am going to have one to wear long-term, I am going to have to work with Scent-Lok to come up with the perfect suit. That is the plan at this time, but plans don't always come to pass (as we all know). For sure, anything from the Winke/Scent-Lok collaboration won't be on the market until 2015. So let that guide your decisions. Thanks for the support. Have a great day. (1-8-14)
  • RC from PA asks:
    Considering purchasing the "Winke Suit". What size do you wear and do you know what size Jared Mills wears?
    Winke Responds:
    RC, I wear an XL Tall. I am about 210 pounds and roughly 6' 5". Jared wears a Large and is 5' 11" and average build. Good luck and have a great day. (1-3-14)
  • James from FL asks:
    Bill, I know you have answered this question before, but I can't locate it in the other questions. What is the thing that you attach to your bow that you use to check the wind? I saw it on your bow an episode or two ago and got me thinking about it again.
    Winke Responds:
    James, It was made by Knight & Hale a number of years ago. They no longer make them and I love mine. It is really handy. It would not likely be too hard to make one if you have access to from milling equipment. It is basically just a short, round container that bolts to the bow through any hole using a long screw and a rubberized washer. Then the top screws off so you can fill it with pillow stuffing. The lid has a small hole that you can pull the stuffing out of and toss it to the wind. Pretty slick. Good luck and have a great day. (1-3-14)
  • Jason from OH asks:
    Sir, My respects to you. However, you do front for sponsors and throw out DJI Phantom and Scentmaster. Can you at least try the Ozonics and give your opinion before they pay you for that? I have tried it in the past from a tight box blind and BUSTED at 50 yards twice. I practice great scent control. Please stand up and try it, give your honest Christian opinion. You know, freedom of speech, deer are deer and we can't fool them down wind unless thermals are playing tricks we can never understand. Not here to blast Ozonics but box blind window with 10 mph at deer did not work. I respect your opinion but I'm thinking you have avoided this because of your lawyers. Sorry. But thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Jason, I have not tried it and wouldn't start endorsing it if I didn't feel it worked. So there are no worries that I will "get paid off" before I break the truth on Ozonics. I will withhold my opinion since I have not tried it. Sounds like your test is a good one though. Why do you need more info to make your decision? Man, you are cynical. I don't have lawyers telling me what to say! Cut me a little slack here. I have avoided a strong position on Ozonics because I have not tried it and don't want to buy one (that should tell you something) and I don't want to ask for one for free if all I am going to do is tell people it doesn't work. That isn't right. If I hear from enough people that they definitely work, I will buy one. I have not heard from enough people yet (some, but not enough). By the way, I have found ways to fool most of the deer most of the time, but it is not a very comfortable way to hunt. It can be done though. Good luck. (1-3-14)
  • Mason from AL asks:
    Just bought a new suit a few weeks ago and have been in the field with it a couple of times and really enjoyed it. Noticed in your last blog that you have cut a slit for your safety harness into it and it looked like you patched it with some kind of tape. Is that working well for you? Why did you not cut the slit into the "cabelas" logo just underneath? Thanks, God bless, and Happy New Year.
    Winke Responds:
    Mason, Thanks. I didn't want the harness on the outside and didn't want the strap coming out the hood because it is less comfortable and more dangerous in the case of a fall because the zipper would pull right into my throat. I made the cut through the "Cabela's" logo on the inside because it lined up with the top of my harness where the strap attaches. I then put pieces of "Gorilla Tape) over the cut to hold the fabric from tearing and made the same length slit through the pieces of tape. It is a snug fit for the strap, but it works well and the slit is more or less air-tight. Good luck. (1-3-14)
  • Benjamin from VA asks:
    Bill, I bought one off the Scent Suits this year and really like it and I have a second one on the way. I was worried about it being a little noisy, but I've found it's really not noisy at all. However, I am a little worried about what the laminate layer will do in the freezing cold. Im talking below 20 degrees. Im living in Virginia and hunting in Va, but I will be moving back to my home state of Wisconsin next August. So will the suit be more brittle or noisier in Wisconsin's frigid cold winter weather? Also, when you start making the new suit with Scent Lok the only thing that you should add is Scent Loks Clima Fleece. I like how thin and warm it is and I also think that the laminate being sandwiched between a layer of Clima Fleece and the outer layer thats on the suit now would really dampen any noise making it super quiet. One last question will you be looking for any Wisconsin Pro Staffers for the next hunting season? Thanks, Ben
    Winke Responds:
    Benjamin, Thanks for purchasing the suit. I would not worry about the lamination becoming brittle in cold weather but it may be a bit noisier. I can't remember that for sure. I have worn mine in much colder temps than that and not had a problem that I noticed. Thanks for the input on the suit design. We can use all the input we can get. Also, we are always on the look out for good pro staff teams. So if you are interested and have some experience, please contact us at info@midwestwhitetail.com. Good luck with the move. Have a great New Year (12-29-13)
  • Kyle from PA asks:
    Are you coming out with a new line of scent suits next year? I am thinking about purchasing one now on sale but I would rather wait if there is a new version in the near future.
    Winke Responds:
    Kyle, I don't think it will be different next year, but likely in 2015. Thanks and have a great Christmas (12-22-13)
  • John from AL asks:
    Why does the scent suit have a hood? I never see you wear yours in your videos. I have a suit and just find it really cumibersome. Is there any plans to develop a new model in the future?
    Winke Responds:
    John, Not sure on that one. I didn't have final design approval. I didn't want the hood as I never wear it, but my contacts at Cabela's were sure it was needed to seal in odors. There are other ways that can be done too, without a hood. I don't like like them because they aren't comfortable (in general). I have never actually worn the hood on this suit, but I assume it is like all the others. Also, I can't hear as well when wearing a hood. I guess you just do what I do, don't pull it up. I am sure we will have another suit at some point in the next year or two. Have a great day and a Merry Christmas (12-20-13)
  • Skylar from IA asks:
    Hey Bill, just curious what you wear for the late bow/muzzleloader season. Do you wear the "Winke suit" year round? Im looking at new jacket/pant options. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Skylar, I wear the suit every time I go to a tree and most of the time when I go to a ground blind. Good luck. (12-13-12)
  • BRIAN from IA asks:
    HI BILL, GOING TO BUY YOUR WINKE SUIT BUT NOT SURE WHICH SIZE I AM 6'0 240 WHICH SIZE DO YOU SUGGEST. NEED A QUICK ANSWER WHILE THEY ARE ON SALE
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I would say the XXL would be the best bet because you wear a few layers under it in cold weather. Good luck. (12-14-13)
  • jeff from NC asks:
    Bill ,do you still use that method of washing your clothes with the oxygenated water? If so what is it called,and is it efficient?
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I still use it, but I am not sure how well it works. I think it is working. The clothes don't have any odor when they come out. It is really hard to know for sure. I use a bit of detergent with it sometimes if the clothing is soiled so I am not relying solely on the system. It is called Pure Wash. I have read a number of reviews on it, and all so far seem positive. I am not sure what to tell you. I wish there was a really good way to compare. I suppose I could create identical situaions on two different pieces of clothing and wash one with the system and one without and compare. Good luck. (12-5-13)
  • Billy from NJ asks:
    Personally I don't believe in the charcoal based scent containment suits, with proof. When the sutis first came out a friend bought one. $300.00. He had bird dogs. He tested the suit by wrapping a dead pheasant it the leg of the suit then rolled up the pants and rolled that package it the jacket of the suit. His brother went out in the field a stuck the "package" in a brush pile. Then they let the bird dog out of the truck and hunted the suit. The dog pointed it 3 times. The company, at friends complaint, said "it's meant to absorb human odor". Really? Like the charcoal is that smart he said, and I agree. It's a farce. I don't know about the silver suits and use the base layers. What do you think Bill?
    Winke Responds:
    Billy, I don't ever beleive anything is going to be 100% unless you completely seal yourself in a scent-proof bag and even then it might not fool a trained dog. Consider the lengths drug smugglers go to hide their shipments and the dogs still sniff it out. I think the charcoal technology works (charcoal filters are common in the market, for example) but I think it is far-fetched to believe it will completely hold your scent when it is that comfortable and that breathable. For it to really work well, I believe it would have to be very uncomfortable. Silver is an anti-microbial and won't do anything to stop other forms of human scent. Use the scent control clothing products for an edge when the wind swirls and to limit how far a deer can smell you. This will keep your hunting area fresher longer, but don't expect the current products to completely conceal your odor at close range. I could write a book about what I have learned playing this game of scent control, but the bottom line is that the best you can hope for if you do everything possible is to fool most of the deer most of the time and that is taking much more extreme measures than just wearing a nice comfotable activate charcoal suit. Good luck. (12-2-13)
  • Jake from WI asks:
    Bill, What scent control precautions do you take with the clothes you wear under your scent suit?
    Winke Responds:
    Jake, I don't take enormous precautions with the underlayers. Typical stuff: I wash in unscented detergent and store in scent-proof bags or tubs. I wash the under layers about once every two days of hunting and wear a Scent-Lok Base Layer system on the outside (if possible) just under the suit. Good luck. (12-2-13)
  • Greg from MN asks:
    I discovered your website this fall and have significantly improved my knowledge as a hunter. I am very impressed with this website and am a huge fan of the show. In fact, I was watching some old episodes the other day and realized one of my relatives used to be one of your prostaff members (Colton Cason). Two questions for you. One: How can I get on the list for your book? Two: I've read all of your information on scent control but have always been curious about keeping scent control of human breath. I know it sounds silly, but do you think deer smell breath? I can't imagine there is a way to control this scent.
    Winke Responds:
    Greg, Thanks for the support. Colton was one of our original members. Lots of fun and a great hunter. We called him "Killer". He is not too busy with school (college) and not able to hunt as much. There is no list for the book. I will just keep ordering more if the original shipment sells out. So no worries. I would say to check back in the next few weeks to see if it is added to the gear list (MW Gear). I don't know about human breath. A lot of people think deer smell it and react to it. I personally am not convinced, but I have only my own experience to go by so it is not a real scientific test. I had better not offer my opinion as truth. Many people use carbon filters to solve the breath thing, which seems a bit odd to me since the carbon will gum up with condensation in about five minutes on a cold morning. Anyway, I don't know for sure. Good luck. (11-29-13)
  • steve from NY asks:
    Hey bill love the show. ? About the wind. I hunt on public land so usually i try to find bedding areas to hunt or travel corridores. When u pick a stand do u usually hunt on a cross wind or do u try to have it 180 from where the deer are coming? Iv had pretty bad luck this year spotting deer and wondering if I'm doing something wrong with the wind. Thanks for the input.
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, I set up for either of those situations. Either 180 degrees or 90 degrees from where I think the deer are coming but never less than 90 degrees because you don't have any margin for error if the wind swirls or changes a bit during the hunt. Good luck. (11-26-13)
  • Matt from ON asks:
    Hi Bill, With the colder temperatures of the late season, I am no longer able to hang dry my hunting clothes outside. I assume that you wash your hunting clothes often during the season, so my question is; how do you dry your hunting clothes after washing when its so cold out? Good luck in the late season, Matt
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I use the dryer but only a dryer that has never been used with normal detergent and fabric softeners, etc. I can't think of any other option on really cold days. One of the things I like about the suit that I designed with Cabela's is the fact that it is mostly just membrane with a thin nap outer. You can wear it wet if you have to, but it will drip dry very fast in the sun, even on marginally cold days. Good luck. (11-21-13)
  • Tim from PA asks:
    Bill, you don't have to put this one up on the site, but I wanted to ask you about the Winke suit. I bought one last year from Cabelas, and had good success with it last year, but never really wore it out in a heavy rain until yesterday morning. We had a pretty steady rain all morning. I had thought that the suit was 100% waterproof, but I soon found that water was coming in from the seams. Everything I had in my chest and leg pockets became soaked, which then let my undergarments become really wet too. Did I just get a bad suit? Thinking of taking it back to Cabelas....but not sure if they'll take it this long after I bought it. Ps-love the show and site
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, I thought it was waterproof too but like you have not worn it in a real frog choker. It is possible that they didn't seal the seams on this garment in order to make it more affordable and that would contribute to what you are saying. If they aren't advertising it as waterproof, they may not take it back because they never claimed it was waterproof. If nothing else, it is good information for everyone and now we know not to count on it to be 100% waterproof. Good luck. (11-18-13)
  • John from IL asks:
    Have you and Cabela's thought about the idea of offering the new Winke suit in the outfitter camo? That's a great pattern!
    Winke Responds:
    John, That might be an option. At this time, the next generastion of the suit should be a collaboration between myself and Scent-Lok. It is be a Cabela's exclusive so that may open up some different camo options. Thanks for the input. (11-16-13)
  • Chris from AR asks:
    Considering purchasing the scent contaiment suit you developed with Cabelas. Do you have any recommendations for sizing? Are the sleeves bulky? I am 5' 10" 200 lbs. Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, I would say you are Large. The sleeves offer room but have some elastic in the lower part to keep the material from billowing out near the bowstring. Good luck. (11-10-13)
  • Todd from MN asks:
    I hunt in a populated area that gets quite a bit of human traffic on the trails through the woods. Wondering how much scent control is really necessary, when the deer are used to smelling people around constantly. I've been through the area on the 4x4 just a couple hours before sitting on stand and seeing deer.
    Winke Responds:
    Todd, It is not nearly as critical in places like that, but I would still take the steps. The deer will think you are farther away than you are and will move more naturally. They are not going to just walk right up to you when they can smell that you are right there, but if they think you are far off, it will work out much better. Good luck. (11-4-13)
  • Bill from MN asks:
    Hey Bill, I am considering purchasing the Winke Suit, but wanted to see how you use it in colder weather. With daytime highs in the 30's, do you need to put a lot of base layer on for longer sits? Would you wear a fleece under it or a proper winter jacket? Thanks, BIll
    Winke Responds:
    Bill, The suit will eliminate one layer of clothing on windy days and is neutral on still days. Because it is windproof and is one-piece, there is no chill factor and no "cold spots". I like it for cold weather. I just wear a couple layers of long underwear under it and a thin vest and I stay pretty warm in all but the toughest conditions. For all day sits, I always add one extra layer and wear warmer boots than you might otherwise. The suit does seem to reduce the amount of clothing I have to wear to stay warm. Good luck. (11-5-13)
  • doug from MO asks:
    do you believe that rain will clean up the human scent you leave when moving tree stands or scouting etc. It has been warm and raining here so I moved some stands around to get a little closer to the action just wondering how long to wait to go hunt there
    Winke Responds:
    Doug, I don't think it completely washes it away, but it sure helps. It seems that deer pay much less attention to scent after it has been rained on. I think you are good to go right away. Good luck. (11-2-13)
  • Mike from MD asks:
    Bill..I have one of your scent containment suits. I wore it on a humid afternoon recently and when I took it off I noticed it was damp/ wet inside from condensation. What if anything do you do to clean it after hunting on a warm humid day?
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I always try to air it out after each morning hunt, if possible, by hanging it outside or run it through the Scentmaster Box after evening hunts. That dries it out and removes any odors that may have "lodged" on the garment since the last washing. Good luck. (11-2-13)
  • Alex from WI asks:
    Bought one of your suits and I am exited to use it. I think it says on the tag "Guaranteed to shoot 200inch deer." Anyway when will the daily rut video blog start?
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, We have started it right now. Thanks for buying the suit. I hope it does produce a 200 incher for you! Good luck. (10-29-13)
  • Jim from IL asks:
    For the last several years I have been wearing rubber boots. For no other reason than because almost all of the pros say this is the only way to go scent free. But every pair of rubber boots I have had has a major rubber smell that will not go away even after years. I noticed that on your hunt on Oct. 14th the video shows you wearing regular leather boots. What is your feeling on rubber boots?
    Winke Responds:
    Jim, The ones I am wearing aren't leather. They are cordura nylon from Cabela's (Whitetail Extreme boots) that have Gore-Tex Scent-Lok lining. I have worn these style boots for at least 15 years and I do just fine on the ground scent. They are very comfortable, warm and don't have that rubber odor. The main thing is to scrub them down good when you get them, leave them out in the sun for a couple of days to air out and then only wear them when hunting (not in the vehicle, etc.) Good luck. (10-29-13)
  • Brad from IA asks:
    Does your cameraman always wear the winke suit and scent lock when you are?
    Winke Responds:
    Brad, Yes, I have two of them in my Scentmaster Box at all times. Good luck. (11-3-13)
  • bob from OH asks:
    do you use ozonics
    Winke Responds:
    Bob, I have not tried it and have expressed my thoughts, for what they are worth, on the Ask Winke a number of times. Please do a search (top of the page) under Ozonics and some of that should come up. Good luck. (11-3-13)
  • Adam from IL asks:
    Bill, Do you think it's ok to flatuate on the stand? I've been leaving the woods bloated and l'm looking for relief. Is there any scientific evidence that deer associate human gas with danger? I know I associate with danger, but would it hurt my hunting if I relieved myself on stand?
    Winke Responds:
    Adam, I hope it is OK because I have never left the woods bloated, if you get my drift. Actually, you wouldn't want my drift! In seriousness, I would be extremely shocked if a deer could tell the source of a fart! Blast away, you have nothing to fear. Good luck. (10-25-13)
  • mitch from MB asks:
    Love the show bill! Do you do anything to mask your breath scent up in the stand? I heard eating apples on way to the hunt helps. Also ever consider hunting manitoba? Fantastic genetics up here. Keep up the great work!
    Winke Responds:
    Mitch, I don't, except maybe to breath out of my nose when deer are downwind sometimes. Many people think I am wrong, but no one has ever convinced me that a deer knows human breath odor to be a sign of danger. Is our breath so different from other odors in the field? It is not made up of "human odor" in the sense that deer have come to recognize it. I know they are not afraid of human saliva. All you have to do is spit in front of the next small buck that sneaks past your stand with his nose to the ground and you will see what I mean. Maybe I am wrong, but until I see some real proof, I am unconvinced. I hunted the Interlake region our of Fisher Branch back in 1994. Of course that is a long time ago, but I didn't see much. Hunted wilderness mostly. It was a tough week. I would love to get up there sometime to hunt the ag areas. Good luck. (10-29-13)
  • John from MN asks:
    I occasionally use an ATV to travel part of the way to my stand and in doing so I surely pick up some exhaust odors. Do you feel that petroleum odors are significant?
    Winke Responds:
    John, Yes, significant enough to avoid them. How about putting on your outerwear after you get parked? Maybe wear a set of overalls that you can leave with the ATV when you are driving in and out and leave your outerwear in a tote strapped to the ATV. Good luck. (10-28-13)
  • Eric from KS asks:
    Hi Bill, fantastic show. You just keep raising the bar!! In regarding to the Winke suit, how exactly do you wash it? Use anything special type of wash? Put in washing machine or hand wash? What's your best tips in regards to the actual washing to minimize handling and not messing up the suit. Thanks in advance.
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, Thanks. I wash it in Atsko Sport Wash right in my wash machine. I don't use the washer for anything but hunting gear and never used scented detergents in it. I air dry outside. It dries really fast. I never touch the suit except with clean gloves on so as to keep human scent to a minimum. Good luck. (10-25-13)
  • alex from WI asks:
    I see you have two scent suits at cabelas. the scent suit and the scent coveralls. what is the difference? Is one warmer then the other? All i see is that the coveralls have more zippers. why do you wear the suit instead of the coveralls?
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, They are the same product. If you look closely, the one is just a size tall and the other is standard height. Good luck. (10-23-13)
  • Joel from AR asks:
    Hey bill, what do you recomend to do with the new suit as soon as i get it? Wash it, air it out, just wondering what you think would be the right proccess? Thanks again. P.S do i win a prize for most questions asked?
    Winke Responds:
    Joel. I think you have a long ways to go before you catch up with some of these guys! It is all good. I would wash it and hang it out. It should come in a plastic bag so it is not super critical that you wash it first, but it is a good precaution. Good luck. (10-21-13)
  • Charlie from AR asks:
    Do you keep the scent suit separate from your other hunting clothing? How do you refresh the suit, do you refresh it after every hunt, or a set amount of hours.
    Winke Responds:
    Charlie, Yes, I do keep it separate. I wash it to keep it fresh about every three or four days and hang outside to dry. I don't run it through the dryer. Good luck. (10-21-13)
  • Seth from IA asks:
    I'm a bit confused with all this advertising on scent confining clothing. It sure does seem like you work hard to advertise the products you endorse and how well they work. However, in all of your hunts you are still playing the wind. In the end it seems like playing the wind is most crucial. The scent lock clothing most likely does what its supposed to, but if you still have to play the wind, what's the point. I live in Allamakee county and know your father :)
    Winke Responds:
    Seth, Yes, you are right. Playing the wind is most important. If you do everything pretty well, you can fool some of the deer some of the time. If are a stickler bordering on fanatical you can fool most of the deer most of the time. I don't think you can fool all of the deer all of the time, so you always need to play the wind. If you keep some deer from smelling you, or reduce the distance at which they can smell you will keep your hunting area fresher longer and that is super important. Also, even when playing the wind, there will sometimes be deer that get downwind or the wind will swirl or change while you are on stand so you need the extra scent protection even when playing the wind. It is all about playing the odds over the course of a season. Anything you can do to increase the odds slightly will pay off over the long run. Tell Dad hi for me. Good luck. (10-21-13)
  • Joel from AR asks:
    Hey bill, quick question. I want to get one of your suites whiles its on sale. Im 5.10 145lbs and was wondering what size to get? If your not sure its no big deal but it was worth asking you. Thanks again love your show!! Thanks joel
    Winke Responds:
    Joel, I am not sure, but I am thinking either medium or large. Probably medium, but only guessing. Good luck. (10-19-13)
  • curt from OH asks:
    Bill, Sitting in my blind right now with my 7 yr old son, when taking your kids hunting, what do you have them do to get ready for the hunt when it comes to scent free practices? Scent free clothes, showers, etc.
    Winke Responds:
    Curt, Nothing, we just go hunting. If the wind isn't right, we hunt somewhere else. We often bring lots of stuff with to the blind to make it fun. They hunt out of stands some, but it is more tedious (boring) for them because they are confined. Good luck. (10-19-13)
  • Alex from WI asks:
    Bill, Which do you prefer and or recommend the Scent suit or scent overalls. Could you compare and contrast them for your followers as I am looking to buy one of the other. I hunt in Wisconsin and Iowa and get into so pretty thick stuff. Thanks, Alex
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, They should be identical. Cabela's just changed the name slightly. If you look at them, the one is just the Tall size version of the other. Good luck. (10-24-13)
  • Brian from IA asks:
    Do you think rubber boots do a better job of remaining scent free or do other boots work just as well? I have always hunted in Muck boots but my feet get cold and I have recently thought about a change to some insulated boots....
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I think the rubber boots do a great job of containing your odors, but I do think you have to take care of them. Start by scrubbing them down once you get them with an odorless soap or detergent and then leave them in the sun for a few days to evaporate any oils on the rubber. I would then spray them very well with an odor eliminating spray and you should be good to go. Keep them away from odors and don't wear them to and from your hunting area. Scrub and sun them occassoinally to keep them clean. I think if you do that they will work fine. I use Cordura Cabela's Whitetail Extreme Gore-Tex Scent-Lok boots because they are much more comfortable for me to walk in and are warmer for me. I wear the Cabela's Saskatchewan pac boot when it gets really cold and those are great. I scrub the Cordura boots first and then keep them in an open tote between hunts so they don't concentrate foot odor. I keep them away from odors and never wear them except to hunt. I believe they work just as well as rubber in keeping my scent from reaching the ground. In the end, it is usually the spots that your pants touch that the deer smell anyway, not the places that your boots touch, so that is really the bigger issue. Good luck. (10-18-13)
  • Jack from KY asks:
    What is your opinion of the Ozonics In The Field Ozone Generator ? Do you think it really works in breaking down your scent and fooling a deer's sense of smell ?
    Winke Responds:
    Jack, I am not sure. I have not actually tried it. The science does make some sense, it is a question of whether this application of the science works. I will leave this one to other people to debate as I don't know enough about that product. Good luck. (10-18-13)
  • Phillip from MO asks:
    What do you think of using the Log6 ozone generator to keep my scent loc suit and gear scent free between washes?
    Winke Responds:
    Phillip, I have done a little bit of research on this (not enough to be an expert) and I think it has promise. Here are the issues and questions that I stil have. 1. will the ozone eventually degrade the product I am trying to clean? My guess is that it will. Ozone grabs any carbon it can find and that might eventually weaken your rubber boots, a zipper on your garment, the strap on your release, etc. 2. Does it remove all significant odors? I am not sure chemically which odors it will remove and which it will not. There is a lot of hype out there and most of the "science" is brought to us by companies selling ozone generators. I would love to see a very focused test. I haven't found it yet. 3. What concentration is required? I have read that at "safe" levels the Ozone is not effective, so you have to confine it and concentrate it to make it work. No problem, putting it in a tote will do that, but I am not sure what the best level is in parts per million, etc. All this to say, it will probably work, but there are still many questions. Good luck. (10-18-13)
  • Paul from WI asks:
    After watching the 10/14/2013 show, I'm very interested about you teaming up with scent-lok and cabelas to make a new scent containment hunting suit. My son and I talked about your idea and we would like to volunteer to be product testers for your new chothing. Not sure that you would use random people that watch your show, but we thought we had nothing to lose by offering you our help. We love the show. Keep up the good work. Paul Plymouth, WI
    Winke Responds:
    Paul, I am going to throw the idea at Scent-Lok to use some amateur field testers when we launch this new garment. It will be a while though. Thanks for the suggestion. Good luck. (10-17-13)
  • Mike from MD asks:
    What brand of base layer scent control clothing, if any, do you prefer?
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I just started uing the Scent-Lok BaseSlayers this year. I think it makes a lot of sense inside the scent containment suit I wear. Have a great day. (10-17-13)
  • Luke from MI asks:
    Hey Bill Love the show huge fan!! My question is in the recent episode was jarod mills wearing your scent suit? And I saw the suit was on sale online at cabelas are they discontinuing it? Also I'm 6'1" 195lbs what size do I order? Love the show keep doing what your doing and smart choice leaving Michigan deer huntings miserable hear think I got my wife convinced to move down to Iowa! Thanks and God Bless!
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, Thanks for the support. Yes, he was. Not discontinuing it, that I know of. Just marking it down. I would think you fit best into an XL. I am wearing an XL Tall but I am about 6'5" and maybe 205-210. I loved hunting Michigan for other reasons. I like the hunting heritage there and all the timber. You just have to set the right expectation. Not nearly as much timber in Iowa, but also much less hunting pressure. Good luck. (10-17-13)
  • Darin from OK asks:
    Do you think a hunters breath can be a factor in a deer catching your scent? If so is it better to brush your teeth to eliminate odor from your mouth or is the smell of toothpaste worse? If you kill a nice buck on an evening hunt how can you get daylight pics the next day and still preserve the deer in warmer tempts? Thanks, love the show!
    Winke Responds:
    Darin, I have never seen any proof of that, but I know many people believe it is a factor. I think the best true remedy for breath odor is to eat an apple about every hour or two. In warmer temps, you will need to pack his body cavity with ice to keep him cool. Be sure to focus on the area between the back legs as that can hold a lot of heat. Good luck. (10-16-13)
  • Eric from WI asks:
    Does your camera man wear/go through all of the scent precaution steps as you do?
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, Yes, I have a second scent suit that he wears. I trust that he showers first, but we both go through the same steps. Of course, you put two people and the gear that goes with filming in the tree and your ability to go undetected drops. We get away with some things, but not as much as I used to get away with before I started Midwest Whitetail when I was hunting by myself all the time. We try to keep gear to a minimum (just a small fanny pack plus camera gear), but it still adds up. Good luck. (10-14-13)
  • derek faught from MO asks:
    Bill, what is the best odor eliminating spray on the market?
    Winke Responds:
    Derek, I don't know. I have not tested them all. Some are merely baking soda in distilled water, others have a chemical composition that works to break down odor molecules. I remember many years ago when my brain was sharper than it is now, I set out to understand the chemistry. I found an expert chemist and explained what was in a few of the sprays and he said that in theory they would all work to destroy organic (odor) molecules. However, the real question is how thick do you need to cover your gear and garments to fully coat it well enough that nearly all molecules are destroyed. I am guessing a lot more saturation than most guys are applying. Good luck. (10-14-13)
  • Eric from ON asks:
    Hey Bill! Sorry for badgering with so many questions.. I know you're an extremely busy guy. Ill keep this short. I was just wondering if you think it would be a good idea to store my scent suit and all my hunting clothes with baking soda in a rubbermAid totte after washing it? Thanks and good luck this fall!
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, I do think the baking soda is a good idea. I would just keep the baking soda in its box and just open the top of the box. It will pull in odors over time even though the air is not moving. Good luck. (10-11-13)
  • David from IA asks:
    Hi Bill, great site! I recently read a question about whether or not a scent-lock suit should be sprayed down with scent-away or any other scent elimination product. This is something I was doing but was told by a hunting friend not to as it plugs up the pores in the clothing. I then went to the label in the clothing and it does say not to spray them down. My question is, when you layer your clothes during the cold weather, do you spray down each layer as you dress or just the layer next to your skin where the bacteria/odor develops? Spraying each layer with a scent-lock suit over the top almost seems like overkill.
    Winke Responds:
    David, Thanks. That is what I thought. I would spray the outside layer, farthest from my body. That way you have the best chance of catching anying underneath as it is forced outward by your body heat. Good luck. (10-9-13)
  • Steve from AL asks:
    I noticed on a couple of occasions that Bill wears hip waders when checking cameras and baiting the camera sites. I am guessing the purpose of the waders is to decrease human scent left at the camera sites but he does not wear gloves when touching the cameras. My question-is touching the cameras without gloves less important than scent left by boots/pants? Thanks- Steve
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, I do touch the cameras without gloves because it is hard to work the latches and sliders with gloves. I barely touch the camera at all so it is likely that I leave almost no scent on it. Not enough, at least, that I am worried about it. I don't want to leave a human scent trail to and from the cameras. Yes, I feel that is much more important than a tiny bit of scent on the camera. Good luck. (10-6-13)
  • Rev. H. R. Curtis from IL asks:
    Two scent experiments I'd like to see your pro staff tackle. 1. A systematic test on what aspect of human scent actually spooks deer (maybe this has been done before?). I can imagine a PIR trigger set up that would send various aerosolized scents into the air when tripped, as well as video the deer and record their reaction. You've mentioned before how human spit and urine don't seem to spook them. You've been checking your cameras for years with no gloves. So what exactly is the compound that does it? Is it simply an unaccustomed scent for that area?....which brings us to... 2. Some brave soul should put diesel fuel in a day time dripper some Sept and then hunt in that area in Oct with a few drops on his boots. Hypothesis: the deer will become accustomed to the diesel smell in that area and it will thus become an excellent cover scent. +HRC
    Winke Responds:
    HR, I think they can smell hand odor and recognize it as danger, but really, the small doses I apply to the camera are not much and it is likely not enough to turn any deer away. I am sure they can smell it, but as long as I am not leaving any other scent around, they seem to accept it. I think it would be very, very hard to actually 100% reproduce human odor in its separate properties. Synthetic odor may or may not actually smell like the real thing to deer. Plus, where are we going to get that stuff? We are forced to use what we know about deer and the experiences we have with a questioning mind after decades of deer hunting to draw some conclusions. I think the diesel would quickly become accepted as part of the scene if left there everyday. That one doesn't concern me at all. However, you can be the test pigeon on that one. Good luck. (10-9-13)
  • Robert from WI asks:
    I read a question on Ask Winke recently regarding the Winke suit. You said that you might be redesigning the suit to include Scent-Lok technology. Have you tested the Scent-Lok claims? I have read that to actually remove any scent from any carbon material it would have to be heated to such a hi temp that it would actually ruin (burn) the material. I've also read that clothing with silver impregnated in the material is far superior to carbon. I'm no expert on these claims but I'm very interested to hear your thoughts. God Bless
    Winke Responds:
    Robert, That rumor has been floating around. Basically, as long as you heat an article to a temperature higher than it was at when the scent got stuck in there, at least some of it will come out. We studied this in chemistry when I was in college. The heat actually excites the trapped molecule and it shakes loose. The size of the pores in the carbon enlarge slightly from the heat too. So, yes, the hotter the better up to a point I am sure, but raising the temp above normal use temperature will rid some of the molecules. Silver is only an antimicrobial. It doesn't do anything to actually capture human scent. It only stops bacterial action on the proteins in your sweat and possibly your body oils (to a lesser extent). The bacterial action is what we recognize as BO, but it is not the only odor present that deer would associate with humans. I feel silver is a good technology, but it is not a 100% solution either. Good luck. (10-5-13)
  • Dan from MO asks:
    Bill do you have any new design improvements in the works for your scent suit for 2014? Hood and face mask area are my primary focus. Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Dan, I am not sure on the 2014 version. I don't believe there will be any significant changes. For 2015 I am going to work directly with Scent-Lok to create a version of the suit that has Scent-Lok inside to absorb any odors that would otherwise stay trapped in the suit. The carbon technoology is proven and by trapping the odors inside the carbon has plenty of time to soak it up. That is one area I have been thinking about since we started this project in 2003 - how do you keep from stockpiling odors inside the suit that could eventually contaminate it when you store the suit. I think we will have that solved. In the meantime I am going to wear a Scent-Lok BaseSlayers suit inside. More about that in the next few years as this evolves. Good luck. (10-4-13)
  • matt from IA asks:
    Bill, Just wondering your opinion on "smoking" your hunting clothes. By campfire or bee smoker. Some hunters swear by it. Thanks. You've got the best show going, It is my only must see "TV" Now I have to go get ready for this cold front that is headed our way. Good luck this weekend, hunt safe.
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, Thanks for your support of Midwest Whitetail TV. I appreciate it. I think the smoker will work well but only in areas where the deer do smell wood smoke at times. I would only use wood smoke, nothing else. I would not smoke any garments with activated carbon or any garments that are designed to contain human scent (like the Cabela's suit I helped design). but any regular hunting clothing the smoke should act as a good cover. Good luck. (10-7-13)
  • JOSH from OK asks:
    Bill, I am looking at getting one of your scent suits and want to make sure I dont order one that is to small. I am 6'4" 210 lbs. What size would you recommend? Also should I clean it and how should I do that if so. I know you have answered this before but I could not find it. Thanks and keep up the good work.
    Winke Responds:
    Josh, You are almost identical to me. I am about 6'5" and 210 and I will be wearing an XL Tall this year. I wore XXL last year bit it was just a bit too big through the middle. I would clean it by washing it with Sport Wash from Atsko. Line dry outside. Good luck. (10-3-13)
  • John from KS asks:
    Mr. Winke, I have a small 5 acre agriculture field that I am allowed to hunt and produces quite a few deer for us, but so far is only huntable in a south or southwest wind. A north wind would work if I could approach from the neighbors property, but I can't obtain permission. Obviously walking across the field leaves lots of scent that will spook the deer. I have been thinking about having someone drop me off with a truck, but that's not always an option. Do you think that hip waders like you use to check trail cameras would allow me to cross the field and not have deer smell where I walked?
    Winke Responds:
    John, I don't think I am leaving any scent with the waders. I would the extra mile and buy some chest waders. I used the Three Forks waders from Cabela's for a couple of years (actually hunted out of them) because they are made of PVC and that stuff doesn't have any noticeable scent. Just leave them out in the sun for a few days and you should be good to go. Good luck. (10-1-13)
  • Cody from WI asks:
    Hey Bill and thanks for your time. I have heard scent blocker, scent lok etc., you're not supposed to use scent spray because it may negate the elements of the jacket or bibs. Is this true, or should a person still use scent spray on these types of clothing? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, I am not sure. It makes sense though on some level. The carbon acts like a filter and grabs other molecules as they pass through. If you gum up the carbon with other substances it is less efficient at trapping other molecules. I would spend some time asking the manufacturers of the clothing to be sure. Good luck. (9-30-13)
  • Ken from WI asks:
    Hi Bill! Great show and love your direct and honest response to hunting gear. I purchased your suit last year from Cabelas. I store the suit in a tote bin. However, was wondering if you knew if any electronic O3 scent eliminator would have any effect on the suit? You have indicated you were going to use the scentmaster box (I think I read that on your feedback with a previous question)! Thanks for your feedback and your efforts in helping bowhunters!
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, I don't and I have heard conflicting stories on how effective they are and also how much they damage your equipment if the O3 is concentrated for long. I will definitely use the Scentmaster Box this year and shy away from Ozone. I will come back and study that some more once more information is available on its effectiveness and effect on equipment. Good luck. (9-30-13)
  • Dave from WI asks:
    Bill, I've heard you say you don't think deer smell our breath. What part of us do you think they smell? Thanks, Dave
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I think they can smell our breath, I am just not convinced it is something to alarm them. I know they aren't alarmed by human saliva or human urine because I have done those tests. At least they haven't reacted to those scents near any of my stands over the years. Try spitting in front of a deer that is right under your stand sometime and see what I mean. I think they smell anything foriegn such as might be contained in the fibers of our clothing that blow off all the time in the wind. And I think they react to the smells of the norma body oils on your skin, your hair, etc. Also, any bacterial growth that produces BO would also be a source of offensive odor. It is possible that they react to human breath odor, but I am not convinced at this time. Someone would have to do a test to prove that. Good luck. (9-26-13)
  • roger from IL asks:
    I just heard that drying your clothes in a dryer is the worst thing for scent control. But I live in town. I have a clothes line, but if I hang my clothes outside I have scent from my neighbors grill, burn barrel, etc. What the best thing to do.
    Winke Responds:
    Roger, The dryers often have odors in them from years of drying clothes that were washed in scented detergent and subjected to dryer sheets. I guess you don't have a lot of options, line drying them in most situations will be best. It is not like the grill is going all day or the burn barrel, for that matter. Nor is the wind always in your direction. Just avoid those times when smoke is coming your way. Good luck. (9-29-13)
  • James from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, I have a tall ridge that runs north/south. I hunt on the east side of it approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the way down. With a predominant west wind, will I deal with a lot of swirling or be protected from the wind (scent wise)? Thanks Bill.
    Winke Responds:
    James, Swirling. There are very few cases where you will be protected from the wind. Maybe on the ground in the middle of cedar or pine thicket or in a tall cornfield, again, right on the grouund. Any other time, if you are out of the direct flow of the wind, you will have swirling. In you situation, I would try to higher on the ridge and you can likely get away with it. Good luck. (9-29-13)
  • Drew from GA asks:
    Hey Bill, I hunt a 200 acre plot that is mostly pine thickets with hardwood valleys about 50-75 yards wide in the middle of the thickets (so if you are standing in the hardwood valley there would be pine thickets on both sides). There is also about a 20 acre area that was select cut several years ago that is brushy and thick. Where do you think the deer are bedding on this land? I have always heard they would bed it the pines, but I have to travel through the pines to reach my stands in the hardwoods and haven't bumped any deer to my knowledge. Also, how would you hunt the wind in this type land? I always feel like the wind is swirling because of the thickets on both sides of the hardwoods. I really enjoy the show! Good luck this season.
    Winke Responds:
    Drew, I am not super familiar with that kind of terrain and cover though I have hunted areas like it a few times in my life. I would think the deer would bed along the edges of the pines where they meet the hardwood valleys. Right on that edge, maybe a little ways down into the hardwoods, probably facing down the slope with the wind at their backs. The pines serve as a wind break and anytime you are on the downwind side of a wind break you will get swirling. The only option is to get high in the tree so that the wind is steadier. Possibly set up in a pine right along the edge of the hardwoods instead of going very far down into them. Then hunt with the wind coming from the hardwoods into your face. That is likely the best hope to avoid swirling. Good luck. (9-29-13)
  • Cody from WI asks:
    Hey Bill..what do you use for scent elimination while hunting? Is using baking soda and water a good way to eliminate scent on your clothing? And is using a fresh earth spray bad to use on your clothing? Will it make me stand out more if it smells like fresh earth? Thanks. Good luck this season
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, I don't use a lot of sprays but I do wear the Cabela's scent containment suit I helped them design. I am also going to be using the Scentmaster Box this year to help remove odors from my clothing between hunts. I am not a big fan of fresh earth spray. Who knows if it actually smells like fresh earth to the deer. I would think the baking soda is a fine choice. I also think storing your clothes in a bag filled with leaves is a good idea. Good luck. (9-26-13)
  • Jacob from MI asks:
    Thank you for a great show, good luck to you and your family this season & a safe season. I washed my hunting clothes in scent free soap at the end of the previous season and stored them in air tight totes (water proof and all). Don't have the funds for scentmaster this year. What are your thoughts on whether I should re-wash everything before I begin hunting again? Thank you again
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, I assume the tote didn't have any odors. If not, then you should be fine. If it did, you have to rewash and hang out in the sun to dry. Good luck. (9-21-13)
  • Nick from OH asks:
    Bill I've heard you talk about what you wash your scent containment suit in, and I have a couple questions about scent containment in general. Do you use sports wash (like the one from wallmart) or atsko sport wash thats made for hunting clothes? Also why do you use a seperate type of detergent for you under layers? Last question is how much more scent free do you think your nylon boots are than rubber boots?
    Winke Responds:
    Nick, I use Atsko Sport Wash. I feel that this detergent is best for washing clean without residue. No reason to use a different detergent for the underlayers. I received a bunch of the other style detergent a few years ago so I have it here. I just use it on the underlayers. I am not sure on the boots. I think that if you can get the rubber really clean and then leave it in the sun for a few days it will probably be alright. I do think that rubber has more odor than the nylon boots right out of the box. I leave my nylong boots outside too, for a few days, and walk in all the creeks and mud holes that I can at first until they lose any "new" odors. Good luck. (9-23-13)
  • Levi from PA asks:
    Do you know any good books or article on understanding the wind flows and what causes swirls. Love the Mondays shows keep up the good work.
    Winke Responds:
    Levi, I don't know of one specifically. You can use common sense and figure it out. Basically, if you are protected from the direct flow of the wind you will have swirling - whether tha is caused terrain or cover. Both will have that affect if you are in a protected pocket. Keep that in mind and you will do fine. Good luck. (9-24-13)
  • Cori from TN asks:
    Bill you talk about wearing your waders in to the stand. What do you do with them once you get to your stand? Do you leave them on the ground or take them up in the tree with you. I assume you carry in a extra pair of boots where the waders are so hot. Also is there a type of material that you prefer in a wader that's better about scent control? I'm hunting some creek bottoms and I take advantage of the high banks and easy access. Your tip on hunting the s bends works great I've found the most sign and seen the most deer in these areas.
    Winke Responds:
    Cori, I don't wear them when I go in to hunt very often. Mostly just for checking trail cameras and hanging stands. When I do where them to the tree (or when hanging a stand), I roll them up tight and bury them with leaves at the base of the tree and slip on other boots to hunt from. I used to wear waders in the tree too, but they are not very comfortable and probably dangerous to climb in. Good luck. (9-19-13)
  • Neil from WI asks:
    Hi Bill, love your show and can't wait for this season to kick off! In your last video about camera scouting, you talk about scent containment. Wearing elimitrax or waders to contain but handling posts and cameras with your bare hands. Looked like a hot day and probably a little sweaty, aren't you concerned about any human scent this might leave behind? Just an observation, keep up the great show and can't wait for next week!
    Winke Responds:
    Neil, I have not seen this be an issue. I suppose I should wear gloves for that stuff but I have never seen these deer shy away from the cameras once they get to the location. It is something I need to think about though. Good luck. (9-12-13)
  • Matt from IN asks:
    When you wash your hunting clothes do you use an everyday dryer, a personal hunting dryer, or air dry them outdoors?
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I use the hunting dryer for my underwear and hang my outerwear outside to dry. I will use the Scentmaster Box for my outerwear (between hunts) this year. Good luck. (9-9-13)
  • Cori from TN asks:
    Bill what is the best way to get the rubber smell off rubber boots. I normally dont wear rubber boots but lacrosse has some snakeproof ones that are a must where I hunt.Other boots are to hot and the leggins or chaps are to much to carry to the stand with extra scent in my opinion.
    Winke Responds:
    Cori, Scrubbing them with an odorless laundry soap and then setting them out in the sun for a few days. Exposure to the sun will evaporate much of that odor. Good luck. (9-8-13)
  • Carl from OH asks:
    Do you wear an XL or 2XL in your scent suit? I am about the same size as you and think I'd where about the same. I'm 6'3" 220lbs.
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, I wore 2XL last year because they didn't have any tall sizes. This year I will wear XL tall. I am about 6'5" and roughly 210 pounds. Good luck. (9-4-13)
  • Dasve from ND asks:
    Bill, love the shows including the new segment on temptation! Your boundry waters trip with your son was awesome as well! I also enjoy another deer hunting video show that has also added to my knowledge of bow hunting put up by whitetailsinc.com. I saw lots of questions on your site about the use of ozonics and I think this video offers some proof that it can work. http://vimeo.com/72216501 (I don't have the money for ozonics...we just some entry level bows...a ground blind and a double ladder stand that scares the you-know-what out of me. My oldest son and I got out for the opener in ND and actually used some tricks you talk about concerning entry points to a hunting area. We both had does within shooting distance...but we are hoping for a buck to start with. Plus the hail started...so we got cut short. Anyways...God Bless you and your family and all the midwestwhitetail crews!
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I appreciate the support. I will take a look at that video as I have no personal experience with that system. I hope you have a great day and good luck to you and your family on the ND bucks. (9-8-13)
  • Steve from OH asks:
    I recently purchased a Thermacell appliance for early season hunting and wanted to know if the odor would be offensive to deer and bear. Thanks Bill
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, I believe if you can smell it, they definitely can smell it. However, there are many other aspects of your apparel and gear that they can likely also smell, so you will need to focus on being downwind all the time. If you are fanatical about scent and feel that you are doing everything and going to extremes and can beat most of the deer most of the time, it makes sense to use other bug options (headnet) rather than take that risk with the Thermacell, but if you are only a casual scent elimination advocate then I would not worry about it (play the wind) - you aren't beating their noses anyway. Good luck. (9-8-13)
  • Eric from ON asks:
    Hey Bill! Love the show and all that you guys do at MW! I have a funny question for you. Do you hunt on days where you have bad gas? Or do you just opt to stay out of your best stands at those times? Also would your winke scent containment suit be enough of a barrier to cover that scent? Hope you have a good season this year Bill. God bless you and your family.
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, It is debateable, but the line on me is that I have bad gas every day! Serioualy, I hunt no matter what. The only thing that keeps me out of the woods is if the wind is wrong and I have only one buck I am hunting, or if he isn't showing any daylight activity or if I have a work load that I have to finish that day. Gas or no gas, I am in the tree. By the way, I am not even slightly convinced that the deer can tell that methane from a person is any different from methane from any other source. Finally, the suit I wear contains that stuff. My wife is wondering if maybe we can a set of pajamas out of it for me to wear at night! Hope you have a great season too. (8-30-13)
  • Nick from OH asks:
    Hey Bill Nick here again...I was on Cabela's website and saw they came out with a new version of your suit. It says its a tall version. I was going to buy another one for this fall and I like the new version of the hood. I was just wondering how much difference in the tall version would it be or do you know??? Im 6'2 225 and usually wear a xl but I do have long arms so im kinda thinking about trying it out. Let me know what you think. Nick
    Winke Responds:
    Nick, I have not tried the Tall size yet, but I do think it will make a difference in pants leg and arm length and length of mid-section, as a minimum. I am about 6'5" and got by with the standard size last year. But it was snug. I will definitely have the tall size this year. I prefer the suit to be a bit too large than even slightly snug. I feel like I can move better when it is looser fitting so the tall may work just fine for you. Good luck. (8-29-13)
  • Brian from IA asks:
    Bill, If I did not want to run my hunting clothes through a washer and dryer would it be a good idea to hand wash them in a rubbermaid tub and then let them air dry outside? I'm really looking forward to see the shows this year! Midwestwhitetail is awesome! Thank you!
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, Thanks for the support. I would say so, but I would wear the latex or other rubber gloves found in grocery stores, etc. for washing dishes to keep any human scent from getting on the items while carrying them around. I wear gloves always when handling my outerwear. Good luck. (8-29-13)
  • Chris from MI asks:
    Bill, like so many, we value your opinions as well as the show. Your content is leaps and bounds above the competition. As I was asking about a farm thats hard to hunt, how well do you think your sent blows over standing corn.
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, I think you are onto something here. I have always thought that the wind blows over standing corn (especially if it is thick and tall) and not really through it, so if you are donw in it your scent won't be carried as far. The wind will swirl around, down, through and over, but the scent should not be carried as far downwind. However, if you are set up on a stand upwind of a standing cornfield, I think your scent will still be carried a long ways. That is a different matter. Good luck. (8-27-13)
  • Mike from IA asks:
    What do you use to monitor the wind on stand? I thought I remember reading something you tie to your bow? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, A thread is a good idea. I have a small dispenser attached to my bow that is filled with pillow/sleeping bag stuffing (polypropylene fill). It has a small hole in it and I can pull out a few fibers at a time and let them go to see where even the most fickle of winds is blowing. I like this better than the thread because the fibers actually ride the breeze and you can see them go for a long ways as they swirl around. It is very educational to see where they actually end up. Good luck. (8-27-13)
  • Bennet from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, Few more questions about the suit that I forgot! Do you spray a scent killer on the suit before you get in the tree to kill any scent that could have got on it? or do you just keep it as clean as it can be? also what camo do you recommend to get? Show is the best out there! Thanks Bill!
    Winke Responds:
    Bennet, I have not been spraying it, but I think that is likely a good idea. I feel like keeping it super clean is the most important thing. We like the Realtree camo patterns, but really any good pattern that is not too dark and break up the outline with plenty of contrasting colors (like branches and leaves, etc.) will work well. Good luck. (8-26-13)
  • Bennet from WI asks:
    Hello Bill, My dad and I stopped at Cabelas to look at your Cabelas endorsed scent control suit. We just had a few questions about it. Is it too warm in early season and not warm enough in late season? I would like something for early September through late December. I'm worried I could get cold. Is it water resistant? What is the benefit of this suit over a regular pants and jacket scent lock/ scent blocker suit? I really like it and I'm only 16 so its a big investment for me and I want to like how it works. Let me know your thoughts! Thanks a lot Bill! Big fan!
    Winke Responds:
    Bennet, You will never find a single garment that works well for both early and late season. You are going to have to make some compromises. That suit would be a bit warm for early season if you keep it zipped up all the time. When it is warm I zip it down and let it hang from the waist belt and then as I get closer to primetime I pull it up. Anything that is really cool and fully breathable is not going to control much odor. I know you hear claims about that, but really how can it do anything if air moves through it freely. In the late season I just put a few layers underneath, so you want to buy it big enough to fit a few layers. It is windproof so that helps it to stay warmer too. I won't bash the other products. When I was testing them, they never worked very well for me. Advances may have come since then, so I had better not speak to the products offered by those companies. They may work just fine. I think wearing a carbon liner underneath to keep any odors from accumulating on the inside of the garment, may be a good idea. Good luck. (8-22-13)
  • Tom from OH asks:
    Bill, Can you explain how you use your scent suit with a tree harness. Over-the-top or underneath? If so, how do you get the strap out without it choking you? Love the suit!
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, I wore it underneath last year and had the strap out the top (neck). That is not very safe because if you do fall the neck will be tugged and you could choke if youc can't get it unzipped quickly. This year I am going to make a small slit in the back of each suit just big enough for the strap and slide it out the back. I realize this does have the potential for letting some air (and scent) out but it is much safer. The other option, of course, is to wear it on the outside and then make sure to keep the harness very clean. Good luck. (8-20-13)
  • Jeremie from ME asks:
    Hey bill, i built a closet type storage unit for all my hunting gear. it is sealed so no outside air gets in. i am going to put a small ozone machine in there to kill all the scents that my clothing might have on them.. i also put a small heating unit and a small fan in there to help dry if my stuff is damp or wet. do you think something like this will help or hurt my scent free plan???
    Winke Responds:
    Jeremie, It should help your scentfree plan, just be careful with the heater and fan as recirculating that heated air may get very hot if you let it run long. Also, there is still some debate if legal levels of ozone will actually remove odors and there is some concern that higher levels might deteriorate some parts of clothing and boots. Proceed with caution on the ozone, but the heated air is a great idea if you have a way to remove that air or filter it. By raisig the temperature you excite the odor molecules and make it easier to dislodge them, but then they need somewhere to go. If one of the readers is interested in something almost identical that you can buy instead of making, consider the Scentmaster Locker. They are selling the heck out of them to schools for putting shoulder pads, and other sports gear in at night to remove odors. They are pricey, but the ultimate solution. Here's the link: http://www.scentmasterbox.com/scentmaster_locker.html Good luck. (8-15-13)
  • nate from MN asks:
    What do you think of the rubbermaid plastic tote boxes for keeping scent free gear in? What would I have to do to make the inside scent free?
    Winke Responds:
    Nate, I would start by scrubbing it out thoroughly with an unscented laundry soap and then leaving it sit in the sun for a few days (top up). That should eliminate most of the odor. If not, repeat the first two steps and test it again. Good luck. (8-10-13)
  • Dave from PA asks:
    Bill, I have a questions about scent control. Some of my archery spots are a 30 - 45 min quad ride from my house. Not great for scent control. I use scentlok clothing and wash them on a regular basis. What outer clothing would you recommend I were to reduce the order from my quad. I've used paper suits in the past but I'm thinking about wearing a rain suit. What about head protection. Thanks in advance. Dave
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I would wear a coverall like a Carhart or something along that line and keep your clothing in a tub on the back of the ATV and then dress in your Scent-Lok when you get there. Rain suits can definitely work because they bottle up odors inside, like the suit I developed for Cabela's. However, I would still not wear it to and from the hunting area. Good luck. (8-9-13)
  • Gerry from IA asks:
    Bill, I know you go to great lenths to try to minimize your scent in specific areas, keeping human scent to a minimum. At what point do you think they get used to it. I hunt a controlled hunt her in Central Iowa that is around a bunch of houses. We are basically hunting in peoples back yard. I have killed Deer downwind and my favorite stand is one that is very un predictable as the deer can come from all directions. Typically most would say this is not a good stand to hunt because you can educate deer. I have learned to not worry about it because I do think they are used to human scent. Any logic to this or am I crazy?
    Winke Responds:
    Gerry, I think they only get used to it in areas where they constantly encounter it in non-threatening ways. For examples, suburban deer expect to smell people in certain areas, but not in others. In the areas where they expect to smell people they aren't as sensitive when they do. Your situation is unique. If hunting deer that aren't always around people in a non-threatening environment, those methods would not work. Good luck. (8-7-13)
  • Scott from IA asks:
    Your thoughts on Ozonics? Not sure if they are a sponsor or not but I am sure you have seen them. Very pricey but are they a good investment? Thanks Bill!!
    Winke Responds:
    Scott, I don't know. I have not tried them so I can't say from experience. I have talked to a lot of people about Ozone and what it can and can't do. Seems that it can work in some applications but to simply place it over your head in the tree stand is a bit hard for me to swallow. I am a skeptic at heart when it comes to scent control claims anyway, so I am very hard to convince. I guess I would try to find a friend you trust who has tried one. Good luck. (7-30-13)
  • Nick from IN asks:
    Bill,First I'd like to say I really enjoy the show, by far the most professional show on today. I was getting all my hunting gear out the other day, just to inventory my gear. I opened a tote hunting clothes were stored in, I smelled a foul odor and immediately realized I had left the leaves I use to store my clothes with in the fall in there all winter. I wouldn't have thought it would of caused an issue, but it left an almost musty odor. I've tried a couple of commercial hunting washes as well as just water and baking soda and left out to air dry all to no avail. Do you have any suggestions for me?
    Winke Responds:
    Nick, That is somewhat of a natural odor so I am not sure how the deer would react to it. They may not react at all. I guess all you can do is try it and see. I would not try to cover it up because what you cover it with may be more offense than the musty odor. I spoke with Jamie at Scentmaster and he assured me that the Scentmaster Box will indeed remove these kinds of odors. He stated that such concentrated odors will take three or four one hour cycles, but it will remove them. The unit circulates hot air through a carbon filter and over time that will remove any odors. I will be using the product heavily this fall, so I will have the chance to see this first hand. Mostly I will use it to air out my clothing after each day's hunt. It does make a lot of sense. Jamie said that some people buy the box just for this purpose and he sells many of the large lockers to sports teams to keep their gear from stinking after a hard sweaty day of practice. The Scentmaster Box is something you may want to try. Good luck. (7-15-13)
  • Nick from OH asks:
    Hey Bill I have read some comments on how you don't use rubber boots. I have always used the rubber boots but have been cautious because I still do smell the rubber smell. Why do you choose a boot like the whitetail extreme from cabelas rather than a rubber boot? What are your reasons and pros and cons? Nick
    Winke Responds:
    Nick, I have not been picked off much with the Whitetail Extreme from Cabela's as I only wear it when hunting, not even in the truck. These lace up boots are much more comfortable and warmer for me. I used to wear rubber all the time and I did get picked off on ground scent sometimes. You are much more likely to leave scent where your pants brush against vegeation than you are from the boots themselves. If you wear rubber, you need to snug the top up so you aren't simply pumping odor out with every step you take. Good luck. (7-15-13)
  • Aaron from MN asks:
    Hey Bill, I have a question I tried seeing if you answered yet but couldn't find so here it goes. Have you ever hunted with a thermocell in the early season when the mosquito's are out in full force. I can smell the scent it give's off so I assume the deer can as well. I have shot a doe when using it but want to know if you think if it will scare off a mature buck. Sorry if I am asking a question that has been answered before. Thanks in advance and I can't wait for the shows to begin.
    Winke Responds:
    Aaron, I have not used them, but if you can smell it, they can smell it. The question is whether they find it offensive. My guess is that it is not a natural odor so they will find it new and that creates suspicion. I would definitely play the wind if you are using one. In fact, I always play the wind anyway and just use the scent proof measures as a kind of insurance policy if a deer gets downwind or the wind swirls. You never can trust any scent elimination strategy enough to hunt a bad wind. Good luck. (7-10-13)
  • Alex from MN asks:
    How do you care for the scent suit? Can you wash it and do you store it in a scent proof bag like normal hunting clothes?
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, I wash it in Sport Wash because I feel that detergent causes the least residue and then I line dry and put in a scent proof bag. I don't handle it with my bare hands. I always wear clean gloves. Good luck. (7-10-13)
  • Alex from MN asks:
    Hey Bill I just got the scent suit. I was wondering how you store it? Do you just keep it in a scent free bag like normal hunting clothes or is there a special/more effective way to keep it clean of unwanted odors? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, I do. I keep it in a scent-proof bag but I don't air it out well after the hunting season so I am not storing the clothing wet or otherwise in a manner that would encourage or bottle in bacteria growth. The Scentmaster Box makes that much easier during the season now. You can run your clothes for a short time every day after hunting to keep them aired out and dry. Good luck. (6-30-13)
  • Nick from OH asks:
    Hey Bill, big fan of how and what you do. Im a 23 year old college student and bow hunting is my biggest passion in life. I had a few questions about your suit you made with cabelas. First being, what temps could you use it in? It seems with the membrane it would be too hot for early season? Also what are the coldest temps you are comfortable wearing the suit? Last question is what is the best way to put myself out there into the industry. Ive done some work with horton crossbows and have met some industy people but it just seems very hard to get in. Any feedback would be appreciated. Nick
    Winke Responds:
    Nick, I would use it for any hunts under 70 degrees, but I would keep the top down and sides open for venting when walking and would also keep it opened up until the last two hours of the day. When it is cooler, of course, those considerations aren't needed. I layer under it when it gets cold and because it is windproof without any gaps (one-piece), it does a nice job of keeping my entire body warmer in cold weather. I always get one that is big enough to layer underneath. It can be hard to get into the hunting industry. The best way to get started is to do a regular job (like design, graphics, marketing, manufacturing, etc.) for a hunting company. Very, very few people start out with their dream job. They work into it. Be persistent, work hard and be willing to start at the bottom and work up. That is the best advice I can offer. Good luck. (4-19-13)
  • Aaron from MN asks:
    Mr. Winke, I have a question that I have been pondering for a few years. I looked back at your other scent answers but can's find the answer to my question. Do you think deer would be scared of human #2? Everyone has do go I would guess and if it does how far from your stand should you go? Thanks for you input! And great shows so far this year again Bill.
    Winke Responds:
    Aaron, Another question I have never answered. I don't think they would react to it, based on what I know about deer and how I have seen them react to human urine and human saliva. I don't believe there is human scent in those excrements (at least not in a form that they are used to associating with humans). I don't think I would enjoy sitting there looking at the pile, so I would go at least far enough to get it out of sight. Just kidding. You can dig a shallow hole, do the job and then kick some dirt and leaves over it. No need to go far. Good luck. (4-10-13)
  • KW from IA asks:
    I want to order one of the scent suits but don't know what size i would wear.I want to ware other clothing under it when it gets cold. Im 5'9" 170lbs I ware Xlarge shirts
    Winke Responds:
    KW, My gut tells me you need M or L. I would suggest M and if that is too tight with a couple of layers, then send it back for the L. Good luck. (3-26-13)
  • Luke from MI asks:
    Hey Bill love the show sorry to see all your losses due to ehd. Have you noticed a big difference as far as getting winded by deer since you developed your suit? Also whats your take on elimitrax products? Also where are your from?
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, I have been wearing this suit or its predecessor since 2004 and yes I have seen better success with not getting winded. You still do have some issues at times, but I feel that just being able to cut the distance at which a deer can smell you is a big deal. Sometimes I have gotten away with a lot, and at times a deer may act a bit goosey. It is tougher now with all the camera gear and two guys in the tree (more than twice as much scent), but we still do pretty well as far as not being scented. Good luck. (3-22-13)
  • Jake from WI asks:
    Bill, I've read your advice about trying to keep your scent suit as scent free as possible by not handling it and keeping it in a scent free bag, etc because you don't feel you can ever wash all the scent out of it. I agree with all of this but what about in production? I would think that by the time you get the scent suit either from a store or in the mail that it would have been exposed to as much scent or more than it will through the lifetime of the suit. I'm not saying it should be ok to be careless with the suit but there should be a way to wash or clean it more thoroughly. When you do wash your suit what do you use? Love the show, and I hope you find a few bucks to hunt this year, we need some more drama!
    Winke Responds:
    Jake, I doubt when you mail order the suit it has been handled a ton. It would not be efficient in the production process if it was handled a lot. It is bagged in plastic. I agree, the ideal situation is to have it made in a sterile environment, but I am pretty sure that is not going to happen any time soon. So every piece of clothing you own starts that way, with some contaminants. So the goal is to keep any further contamination from occuring. If you hunt in something with less surface area (very smooth) you will have less risk of contamination because you can wash it out better (less places for the scent molecules to hide and secure). However, such garments are notoriously noisy and possibly shiny in the sun. It is all a trade-off. I use Atsko Sport Wash to wash my suit. Good luck. (3-22-13)
  • Cody from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, I have some questions about your scent suit through Cabela's. Is the scent suit quiet, does it make a lot of noise when hunting? Is it bulky or not? Thank you or your time and good luck hunting this season!
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, It is not totally quiet. I wore it all last season and never had any issues with it, but when it is dead still out you may notice the rustling of the fabric. I am not sure how far away a deer can hear this. It always seems louder when you are right there next to it, but as I said, I never had a deer hear it last season. I am sure that with even a slight breeze moving the leaves and grass, the sound of the garment would disappear entirely. It is not bulky at all. Very lightweight actually. Good luck. (3-19-13)
  • matt from MO asks:
    Bill, What is the name of your new scent suit? I assume it will have bill weinke in it. I haven't seen it yet searching cabelas online. Also, Thank you for your show...your low impact,entry exit,fresh stand thoughts enabled me to miss a great buck this season.lol. Still exilerating to get close to a nice one. Thank you for your time. Have a great off season(if you even truly get one).
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, My name isn't in the name of the product. It is called Scent Seal. If you search their site under that name you will find it. Good luck. (2-2-13)
  • Dave from VA asks:
    Bill, again, thanks for your time and efforts. I wanted to ask about the ozone laundry system. I figured by now, there would be some educated reviews. Have you continued to use this system and how has it worked in the real world?
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, This is the Pure Wash unit for those who are not famiiliar with it. I have continued to use it every few weeks, as has at least one of the guys on the pro staff. I have not done any scientific testing to determine the claims so my conclusions are just observation based. I would have to say from my experience that it does remove odors and dirt. I have not tried it on any serious stains so I am not sure how it will do there, but overall, I am favorably impressed. Good luck. (1-27-13)
  • Rob from AL asks:
    Bill, love the show part of my daily routine is watching Midwest whitetail shows.Thanks for your hard work and dedication. My question is do you have or know anyone who has any experience with smoking up your clothes hunting accessories and body before hunting for cover scent. I just bought one and used it twice and had deer as close as I have all season with out being detected. I just wish I would have got to try it earlier in the season. Just wondering if you think it is a good idea or bad idea since you have the scent suit and do all of the scent free things. Is this just a gimmick for sloppy hunters who don't do the scent free things? Seems to work pretty good so far. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Rob, I wouldn't say it is just for sloppy hunters, no. It has potential. When I used to hunt up in MI's UP I hunted from wooden huts with small wood stoves in them. The deer never smelled me and the stove pulled all the air through and up the chimney with the smoke. They never reacted to the scent of the smoke either. I doubt it will work under all conditions, but if you will keep the clothing and your body very clean, it will certainly aid, in my opinion. Good luck. (12-20-12)
  • Jason from KS asks:
    Thanks for answering my last question, I appreciate it. My next question is about cattle country again. I never use cover scents and seldom attractants other than on a scrape (I go as scent free as possible). It seems to me that hunting where cattle are present offers an opportunity at a cover scent that I’ve never seen marketed. Cattle cover the pastures and are always on the move. Their scent should be everywhere and it should come as no surprise when a deer come across cattle scents in new locations and in various strengths. Is this marketed anywhere? If not, then why? The only thing I’ve found on the internet was made from cow waste. I’m thinking more an animal smell and not a poop smell…
    Winke Responds:
    Jason, No, I have not seen this. I am guessing it just never occured to anyone before. It never occured to me, beyond stomping cow pies to add cover scent that way. I think it is a decent enough idea. I would not get the urge, however, to run out and start a scent company. It is a tough market to get into. Lots of stout competition. Best regards and have a Merry Christmas. (12-20-12)
  • Jim Arnold from IN asks:
    Hi Bill- What is the best powder to use as a wind checker? I bought the store bought kind but am looking to refill it. I have heard corn starch, baking soda, but wanted to know what's the best for creating that big cloud? Thanks Bill. -Jim
    Winke Responds:
    Jim, It has to have the exact right consistency or it plugs the spout on the squirt bottle and nothing comes out. My fear is that corn starch is too likely to clump up. Not sure on baking soda, that might work better. I use polyester fiber filling that would go in a thick pillow or insulated jacket and just release a few fibers at a time. They are quite visible and stay aloft for a long ways. It works better than the powder. I have also used cigarette lighters to watch the flame, but you don't get quite as good of a direction from that as you do from something that floats for a ways. You make a dispenser from a snuff can with a small 1/4 inch hole in the top that you pull it out through. Once you get it started, it self-feeds. Actually, I use a small containter filled with it that attaches to my bow so it is always right there. Good luck. (12-17-12)
  • john from NY asks:
    Bill,I'm a big fan of the show.I've seen you and your staff get busted a couple a times.Have you used ozonics?Nothing is 100%, but for me it's been the best thing since they came out with the compound bow.
    Winke Responds:
    John, I have not tried it, but I will have to at some point. I just don't like carrying lots of stuff up into the tree. We carry a ton of stuff already. I have heard the claims but have not been able to prove or disprove them. So, unfortunately, I don't know much about the results a person can expect. Thanks for the support. Good luck. (12-13-12)
  • Mark from GA asks:
    Bill, MWW is tops, excellent, informative, QUAlity! I noticed you wearing waders while putting out trail cams in your most recent show. I'm guessing that's for scent control. Do you always do this? Just curious if you would let us know how much land you own. Do you have problems with trespassers trying to come in and take advantage of your amazing management practices? It doesn't seem that you do b/c you and your team regularly are able to locate known deer - whether by killing them, or finding them dead. How can you be certain that all/many of these dead deer that you are finding are EHD kills? Do you think coyotes may be killing some/many/all of these deer? Last, have you ever heard that pouring out corn in a pile for deer can be harmful b/c of the likelihood of bacteria from the saliva of an infected deer being easily transferred to more of the herd? Maybe it's not true, but I've been told to never pile up corn in front of a camera b/c of this. I typically broadcast corn
    Winke Responds:
    Mark, Thanks for the kind words. I wear those to keep scent down in these places. I always do it. We own 1,000 acres. Not any problems with trespassers. I have great neighbors that watch out for me and really, this farm is not a not a ton better than other farms in this part of the state. We have had a run of a few few big deer here lately, but otherwise it is not as good as you might think. Right now I am trying to find anything to hunt on the farm. There are only a couple of older bucks on the farm right now and nothing at all with any size. So, it looks good on the shows because I am able to find back the bigger deer, but once they are gone (now) it is pretty thin. It was classic EHD for Bubba. He disappeared in mid-September when the disease was at its height and we found him near water. He looked fine on the photos and then gone - dead. Again, typical of EHD. Coyotes don't kill many adult deer here, only the ones that were sick or injured. I do think they kill fawns though. I think there is something to the idea that nose-to-nose feeding by deer is not good. Good luck. (12-6-12)
  • Robert from AR asks:
    Can u store scentlock with baking soda?
    Winke Responds:
    Robert, I don't know. I am assuming that you can since the baking soda is absorbing odors too. It is just a bad idea to store Scent-Lok (or any absorbing technology) with a cover scent, for example, that would tend to clog the absorbing mechanism with molecules. Good luck. (12-6-12)
  • Neil from WI asks:
    Hi Bill, you guys do an awesome job on Midwest Whitetail! I tune in every week! My question- I noticed when u put out trail cameras that you wear rubber boots or hip boots. I'm assuming for scent control, but I notice you handle the cameras with your bare hands. Aren't you worried about that scent bothering some mature deer? Thanks and keep the show going strong!
    Winke Responds:
    Neil, I guess I never really thought about that. Good point. I will have to give that some thought. For sure it would be better not to leave any scent. Good catch. (12-5-12)
  • Jordan from IN asks:
    Are any changes going to be made to your scent suit for next season? I am going to buy one but if there is going to be changes I will wait until next fall to buy the newest design.
    Winke Responds:
    Jordan, It doesn't look like it will be changed next year. Possibly in 2014. Good luck. (12-8-12)
  • Dustin from IL asks:
    Bill, Is the new scent suit from cabelas insulated at all? when watching you and the other prostaff wear it in the field it doesn't look like it has any upper body insulation. If not is it still fairly warm in cold weather? thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Dustin, It is not insulated but it is fairly warm still because it is windproof and being one piece, it doesn't have a cold spot between upper and lower that lets heat out. Good luck. (12-3-12)
  • Pabki from IA asks:
    when checking cameras do you do anything special with clothing, boots, etc.? when do you check them during early season, pre-rut, & post-rut? thanks, pablo
    Winke Responds:
    Pablo, I check them during the middle of the day, all season and I always wear a set of waist high waders I bought from Cabela's to virtually eliminate all ground scent. Good luck. (12-3-12)
  • Nikodemus from KY asks:
    How do you hunt the wind? You don't want the wind blowing in the direction of where the deer are coming from or where the deer are going (where you plan to shoot)? Can you please elaborate a little bit?
    Winke Responds:
    Nikodemus, Crosswinds are best. Obviously, you can't hunt with the wind blowing to where the deer are coming from. If you know they will be past you and the wind will then be blowing to them, that won't work either. I try to have a safe side (where I am not likely to see deer) like an open grass pasture, pond, big valley, even a road. Then I set up so the wind blows out over the safe side. This way, I don't have to know for sure where they will come from or where they will go, just that my odor won't be smelled. I hope that helps. Find spots with a safe side and setup with the wind blowing that way. Good luck. (12-3-12)
  • Carl from TX asks:
    Mr.Winke, I recently got some Xecute products to try out. I noticed that the field spray has an odd odor to it. My question is do you think the odor will be an alarm odor to deer? If you have smelled it!! I'm to the point where I just want to not use any field spray because most all have a odd odor! I know you have said before you dont use field spray. I have used Atosko products the last two seasons in which I like the shower soap and clothes wash. I'm trying to find a spray that works but doesnt smell odd. Your opinion is greatly appreciated. I love your web site and show. This is my favorite site!!!
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, I know it. I spoke to the person who developed that and he said the odor is there on purpose because he uses a natural compound to help adhere scent molecules to the garment so they don't disperse. He said the compound and the odor are not offensive to deer. I guess I need to do some testing. The surest way to know for sure if it works is to use it over an extended time. Brian was pretty solid on his research, but you always have to test to know for sure. Thanks for the support. Good luck. (12-3-12)
  • Hunter from OK asks:
    Bill, your suit is awesome. In short, I arrowed my best bow buck and it wouldn't have been possible without the suit. I was hunting the downwind side of a major bedding area of a morning. Several deer abnormally circled downwind of my stand and they never once caught me. Then, the big buck (5.5 year old) came in with a doe behind the other deer. I shot him at 14 yards and he was directly downwind. This was a high risk - high return type stand but the deer came in where I wasn't expecting them. I never would've had a chance at that buck had it not been for your suit. On that note, I now need to wash the suit. I'm thinking of hand washing it in a tub and then air drying it. Do you think this is a better approach compared to washing it in my washing machine? This suit is arguably the most advantageous piece of equipment a whitetail bowhunter can buy. Thanks for a great product and a great show! Good luck this winter searching for a new buck to pursue. Best, Hunter
    Winke Responds:
    Hunter, Thanks for the feedback. As long as you take really good care of it so it doesn't get contaminated, it will work very well. Hand washing is a better idea if the washing machine was used with scented detergents and softeners in the past. I would wear rubber gloves though to keep human odor off the suit even when washing it. For sure, you want to hang it dry. I appreciate the support. Good luck. (12-3-12)
  • Jeff from MI asks:
    Bill, Best show on TV or the web. You and your staff should be proud! What is the best way to store the scent suit in between hunts so you do not contaminate the outside of the suit with the scent that lingers on the inside? Thanks, Jeff
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, Hanging it out in the sun and wind is ideal. I do that nearly every day. I wash it every three days, or so, using a new washer attachment called the "Pure Wash" because then I don't have to worry about any detergent residue on the garment. I think that helps too. Good luck. (11-30-12)
  • Carl from TX asks:
    Mr.Winke, I was wondering when dress for your hunt do you put on your under garments after you shower and then wear those in your truck and when you park you then put on your suite and boots and go to the stand. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, That is exactly how I do it. Good luck. (11-26-12)
  • Matthew from OK asks:
    Hey Bill. I saw on your most recent video and also on the hunt for the G4 buck that you mentioned thermals. Could you go into more detail on that? How do you hunt them? I never really understood what they were. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, When the day winds are still the thermals really dominate. The more vertical relief you have in your topography, the faster they blow. When the air cools it drops to the ground and follows the lowest part of the terrain down the slope. For example, If you dumped 100,000 gallons of water on the ground near your stand, where would it run? That is where your scent goes when the day winds drop and it starts to get cool toward evening. In the AM the thermals are also going down, but as soon as the sun starts to warm the slopes, the thermals start to risee. They don't follow the terrain as much when they rise, they tend to go more straight upward. For that reason, rising thermals are less predictable than descending thermals. They play a big role in the hunt when the wind is still and in areas with lots of elevation change. Good luck. (11-19-12)
  • Silas from AL asks:
    Congrads On G4 Bill. He is truly an amazing deer. My question is my scent. My uncle killed a 196 inch deer this year here in Ohio and when i asked him what he does to control his scent and he said nothing it surprised me. I am wearimg under armour scent control have you heard anything on it. And two of the farms I hunt are cattle farms. The donkeys are really friendly should i rub up against them and step in some cow manure with my boots. The deer pay no attention to the cattle.Bad idea? Good idea?
    Winke Responds:
    Silas, As long as you always play the wind the scent issue is less critical, but deer don't only go where you think they will. Also, keep in mind that anyone can get lucky sometimes and have deer come past on the upwind side. To be the most consistent over time you need to keep your impact as low as possible and that means keeping your scent as minimal as possible so fewer deer will detect you on the downwind side. The less you smell the shorter the distance at which they can detect you and the less spooked they will be if they do. I have not tried the Under Amour system and so have no idea about that. I don't think I would get mule smell on my clothing but there is nothing wrong with stepping in the crap occassionally. Good luck. (11-16-12)
  • jeff from NC asks:
    I never see you use scent away. I hunt in the south and our season starts in September. The temp. can reach in the upper 80's. It seems no matter what I do to prevent sweating it does not work. So I use that stuff religiously. It comes in a variety of smells. My concern is if I can smell it so can the deer. What is your take on that.
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I am kind of with you on that. I am not sure I want to spray something on me that I can smell unless the science is really well developed on that product and the smell is proven to be non-offensive to deer. How do I prove that? By using it for a long time and seeing the results over many different situations. I don't want to take that risk. So until something comes along that really makes a ton of sense, I just wear the suit I have created with Cabela's and keep it as clean as possible. Good luck. (11-15-12)
  • Bob from IN asks:
    I think I read in Dr. Kroll's book that a Deer can detect either 6 or 7 odor's at once. If that is true, how can coon,fox,or any other cover scent work? And when you see him, will you tell him that this is God's world, not his. I know it's just a tag line but, Sheesh. We are all here to worship God, nothing else.
    Winke Responds:
    Bob, I had not heard that, but does make sense. They have impressive noses. I am not sure if cover scents do work. I think they may help, but I am not 100% sure. I don't use them myself. Dr. Kroll seems like a good guy, so I am sure his reference doesn't intend any disrespects to God's world. Good luck and have a great day. (11-14-12)
  • Alex from OH asks:
    Hello Mr Winke, I just purchased your Winke Suit and it's awesome! My question is what steps do you take to maintain its scent control abilities such as washing,drying,storage etc. I want to keep it as odor free as possible. Also I wouls just like to congratulate you on finally harvesting the DG4 buck. It's the hunters like yourself that keep the younger guys like me motivated and to never give up on chasing that buck of a lifetime. Thanks again, Alex
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, Thanks Alex. I never touch it with my bare hands (always clean gloves) and I never wear it in the vehicle. I even go so far as to make sure that when I tie the sleeves around my waist when walking to the stand that I tie them over the outside of the suit and not right on my undergarments. Keeping that thing from getting fouled is priority number one. I wash it using a device called Pure Wash. It is an oxidizer that attaches to the washing machine so you don't need detergents. If I was going to use detergent it would Atsko Sport Wash. Dry outside not in the dryer where it can pick up odors. Good luck and I appreciate the support. (11-14-12)
  • Ryan from IL asks:
    Bill- I was wondering how warm the scent concealment suit is??
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, It is a single layer so it is not insulated. Because it is windproof and one-piece it tends to keep you warmer inside than you might think. This works well on cool days but can work against you on hot days. Good luck. (11-9-12)
  • NIC from MI asks:
    I have been using carbon suits for a number of years now and go to great lengths, as many of us do, in keeping myself and gear as scent free as possible. I have always wondered with carbon suits and now with the containment suit which I plan on using soon about scent contamination before we purchase the suits. Like from department store racks and is just washing them with scent free soap good enough? Thanks for your time Bill and keep up the good work, God Bless
    Winke Responds:
    Nic, I hear you and think of it often myself. I don't like something off the department store racks for sure. That makes no sense to me. Everyone that walks past grabs it, tries it on, etc. I would not buy a display model ever. You have a better chance with something coming from the warehouse. I think that is the way to go. I think washing them is a good start and hanging them out for a few days in the wind (or even rain) is also good. Good luck. (11-9-12)
  • carl from KY asks:
    What do you think about ozonics, or have you tryed it yet?
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, I know people who swear by it. I haven't tried it. I have answered that question a few times though. I think I will have you do a search under Ozonics and see what you turn up. I have hit it from every angle so rather than try to rehash it, I will suggest you try the search feature. Thanks and good luck. (11-7-12)
  • Joe from ME asks:
    THANK-YOU, THANK-YOU, THANK-YOU Mr. Winke for the Winke suit!!! On Nov. 4th I was 20 feet up a walnut tree with a 5 mph wind and a mature 8 point walked up to within 12 yards of my tree...from directly down wind. Never knew I was there. I LOVE this suit!
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, Congrats. That is awesome. If you handle that thing correctly it will really cut down on your scent. Good job. (11-8-12)
  • Steven from MN asks:
    I was curious about what size to get for the scent containment suit. I'm around 6'5" but only 190lbs. Do I need to get a XXL to make it fit? I wish I could get a L-Tall or XL-Tall but I don't see them available.
    Winke Responds:
    Steven, I would go with the XL. I am wearing the XXL and it is a bit big on me. XL would be better for me and I am about 6'5" 200 right now. Good luck. (11-3-12)
  • carl from KY asks:
    Hi bill: Thanks again for answering my question. I'm like everyone else trying to stay on stand as long as i can. How ever i've got MS and one of the effects of this disease is needing to urinate frequently. Does urine spook deer or should i use a container? Want to hunt as long as i can. A disabled bowhunter is still a bowhunter.
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, Good for you. I am very happy that you are enjoying the great sport! I have been peeing from my stands for many years and I have yet to see it actually affect the hunt. Deer most often ignore it when they come past, but sometimes they will sniff it and move on like it was nothing. They don't seem able to distinguish that it is human urine, versus just urine. Good luck. (10-29-12)
  • Charlie from AR asks:
    Have you ever used or thought about using the ozonics ozone scent eleiminating products?
    Winke Responds:
    Charlie, I have written about this many times on the Ask Winke. If you do a search under Ozonics I think you should pull up a number of references. In short, I think the tech makes all kinds of sense, I am just not sold that you can make it work totally on a stand when the wind is swirling and blowing. I might be surprised by that, but under certain conditions I can't imagine it destroys all human odor. But, as a disclaimer, I must say that I have not tried it. In a blind, it makes tons of sense. In a tree stand, not sure. Good luck. (10-29-12)
  • Chris from MO asks:
    Bill - what is this scent elimination "suit" that you & everyone else are talking about. Is this a product of yours or a product that you are pushing? I try to be as scent-free as possible. Every product has its Pros & Cons. Thanks Chris
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, I invented the concept back in the early 2000s and Cabela's is building it under license from me. They call it the Scent Seal suit. It is on their website. It works on the concept of containing the odors rather than trying to absorb them. Good luck. (10-26-12)
  • Jimmy from IN asks:
    I recently purchased some new under armour clothing with their new scent control and i was wondering if it was ok to let them hang outside after wearing to air out or if this would use up all the absorption?
    Winke Responds:
    Jimmy, I am assuming you can hang them outside, but I really don't know much about that garment or its scent system. I can't imagine a garment you couldn't hang outside. After all, you wear it outside all fall. Good luck. (10-26-12)
  • Virgil from IL asks:
    I figure I'll be ready for the scent containment suit next year. My question is, how waterproof is the suit? Will it holdout in a downpour and dry quickly? I'm also assuming that on those very cold mornings, one has to move slowly to cut down on fabric noise? I guess I'm asking if one suit could cover all weather conditions. Keep up the excellent work.
    Winke Responds:
    Virgil, It should do just fine in a downpour and will dry as quickly as a typical rain garment. It does have some fabric noise so moving slow is a good step. The suit will be warm on warm days so that is when it is the most challenging to wear. Good luck. (10-29-12)
  • Martin Oakland from MT asks:
    Good Morning Bill, I am wondering if you do anything to contain or reduce the amount of scent coming from your head and hair? Thanks. MO
    Winke Responds:
    Martin, I wash my head and hair before evey time I go out and I try to keep my hair short. Other than that, I wear a facemask that will keep some scent in and a very clean hat. I know guys who wear a swimmer's head cover but I don't like the feel of those so I just go with a clean hat. Good luck. (10-23-12)
  • DAVE from VA asks:
    Bill, great job with the site. Two questions. I purchased your suit from cabelas, nice concept. I will wear scent absorbing underneath. Do you think storing with leaves and such in a plastic bag would be a good idea or just leave scent free? Also, our farm in northwest missouri is on the ehd map. What impact have you personally seen from this disease and what should i expect?
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I do think that storing with leaves is a good idea. We have not been hit hard here, but some farms have had more die-off. For sure we have lost some deer, but not a lot of the. It works in pockets. One small area may have a bigger die-off than another area not far away, so it hard to say what the impact will be until you get there and start looking for dead deer. Good luck. (10-23-12)
  • Martin from MT asks:
    Hi Bill, First off, GOOD LUCK with the Double G4 Buck! We are all pulling for you. My question: Do you think neoprene waders contain human scent well? Thanks, Martin
    Winke Responds:
    Martin, Thanks. Yes, I think they do contain odor well. The question is, do they have too much odor of their own? That is why I went with PVC when testing the concept of scent containment. I have a pair of neoprene waders in storage room that I use for duck hunting and they have a distinct odor. Not sure if that will reduce over time (likely). I think if you scrub them down a few times, then leave them out in the sun a few days and then coat them in mud, you might be OK. It would make a good experiment. Good luck. (10-21-12)
  • Don from MI asks:
    Hello Bill, you've got a great thing going, keep up the good work!! I'm very interested in your suit. There seems to be some noise associated from wearing the suit. You said there might be another generation of suits that might be quieter. Is this something I should wait for? I really like the theory behind it and plan on purchasing one, but I'd like to get the most "bang" for my Buck! All my support, Don
    Winke Responds:
    Don, I am not sure when Cabela's will have the next generation. It depends on how quickly they sell these, I suppose. They are not super noisy. I wear it (the same production model you can buy) and I am pretty picky about stuff like that. It is noisier than fleece, but try getting scent out of fleece sometime. Every fabric has its tradeoffs. I think you will be OK with it. Just move slowly if something is near - which is probably what you are doing anyway. Good luck. (10-17-12)
  • Josh from GA asks:
    Bill, On the days you do not hunt, where do you keep your hunting clothes, bows, arrows etc. to keep them as scent free as possible. I actually keep my bow inside my home, but I've noticed that when I get in the field my bow actually smells just like my house. I definitely do not want to keep it outside and wondered how you store all your gear when not hunting. Thanks, Josh
    Winke Responds:
    Josh, I keep the bow in my truck, backseat, usually in a soft case. A bow won't absorb odors like something made of cloth. Spraying it off occassionally with eliminator should be enough to keep it odorless. My hunting clothes (outerwear) are in a scentproof bag in the topper in the back of the truck. If you have a case you can put the bow in, that might help to keep it from smelling. I would just leave it in the garage or the back of the vehicle in the case if possible. Good luck.
  • Bob from IN asks:
    Thank's for your time and effort to answer so many questions. Even my curiously inane questions. The question's and answer's are so informative and thought provoking. I thought that I heard or read that Scent-Lok was sued a few years because their suit didn't stand up to the claim's to block odor's. Is there any truth to that? Also my friend Kevin, "Cut the Cheese" while wearing his suit and kinda proved that claim to be true. God Bless You and Your's.
    Winke Responds:
    Bob, I stayed out of that, but yes, they were sued and I recently saw a press release from them saying they had beaten all the suits. I can't begin to imagine how much that cost (hundred of thousands). I applaud them for fighting. I might have just shut it down and walked away. I like those guys and know them very well. I wish them only the best. I hear you on effectiveness, but like I said, I stayed out of that. Good luck. (10-10-12)
  • Megan from IA asks:
    Does rain wash away human scent? As in, I've walked through a timber or field, will the rain wash the scent away or will my scent still be there?
    Winke Responds:
    Megan, Depends on how much rain you get. I think a light rain will wash most of the scent away but some will remain but much more diluted and hard to detect by deer. I feel that a heavy rain freshens everything in the woods including washing away your scent. Good luck. (10-10-12)
  • Ken from NS asks:
    Bill I find your shows and forums very informative. Keep up the good work. I am interested in your opionon on using ozonics in a ground blind. Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, I think that makes a lot of sense. I know people who have done that very successfully. Good luck. (10-9-12)
  • Mike from IA asks:
    I bought your new scent suite. Since you like to keep the top down till later in the hunt during warm days, how do you wear your fall protection harness? I have been trying to figure out a plan with mine and i like the option of keeping the top down. It almost appears if you do not have one on at times like when you shot Daggers.
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I wear it underneath and then have the strap out the top. That creates a choking risk if you fall because it pulls the suit tight to your neck. I am going to cut a small slit in the back of the suit (I hate doing it but can't think of a better way) to feed the strap through when I pull it up. I always wear the harness and now I never leave the ground without first snapping it to the Safeline climbing rope. I wouldn't leave the ground without it. Good luck. (10-9-12)
  • Dave from CO asks:
    Hi Bill, Just wondering how waterproof the new scent containment suit is? Thanks, Dave
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, Totally waterproof and windproof. If someone is not a deer hunter, it even makes sense to stay dry while fishing, for example. Good luck. (10-9-12)
  • Joe from MN asks:
    I recently went out to my hunting spot and forgot my rubber boots. How long will my shoe odor stay n the ground? How long should I steer clear of the area?
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, Not more than a day or two at the most. I would say that after a full day the deer aren't reacting to it any more. I would stay out for a four or five days if you can. Of course, I am a firm believer that you should do that whenever possible anyway - regardless of what boots you are wearing. They are very good at knowing when you have been there - airborne scent, scent on low vegeation, seeing you and hearing you come and go. It all adds up faster than you think. It is best to give it some time between hunts regardless. Good luck. (10-7-12)
  • Jay from NY asks:
    Hi Bill love the show.Man I hope you get the g4 buck .have to say for some reason i liked the g5 buck better because of his personality.I know im weird lol.Is there a way to quickly remove rubber smell of new rubber boots.Im kinda in a bind my old ones leak.Thanks Jay
    Winke Responds:
    Jay, They are both great deer. I will hunt the G4 buck hard all fall and if nothing happens to him and I don't screw it up, I should have another good encounter with him. Thanks for the support and the good wishes. I think you can scrub them with a stiff brush and unscented detergent and leave them in the sun for a couple of days and be OK for scent on the rubber. Good luck. (10-8-12)
  • Drake from IN asks:
    Hi Bill, I am always looking for better ways to reduce my scent while hunting. I have used a number of detergents and have found that many will not get tougher scents out such as BO and stains out like blood. A while ago I picked up a bottle of organic chlorine-free bleach and started using it on my workout clothes and noticed great results. After researching, I found that the product was made of nothing more than hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water. The product is unscented, natural/organic, and boosts cleaning/deodorizing ability of any detergent. Would this product work for my hunting clothes as well? As far as I know, hydrogen and oxygen are unscented. Ozone (which is very popular now) is simply O3. What are your thoughts?
    Winke Responds:
    Drake, It makes good sense to me. What is the product called? I am experimenting with a product called Pure Wash that seems to work pretty well without any detergent. It attaches to the cold water in hose on the wash machine and using electricity creates some unstable oxygen molecules before the water enters the washer. I have seen some good results and some that left me scratching my head, so I am still experimenting with this one, but it might be a great solution. I believe eliminating the detergent is a great goal. Good luck. (10-4-12)
  • Ken from AL asks:
    Hi Bill! Just wanted to let you know I received my scent containment suit purchased through Cabelas. I have worn it several times here in Wisconsin since our Seasonal opener mid September. My suggestion would be to have the ability to zip off the hood. I personally don't care for it, it gets in the way. The suit seems noisy to me. The membrane inside the suit is stiff and not pliable (it seems similar to Elimitrax). I have washed the suit several times with Astko, thinking it may quiet the suit down. I know you have used your suit for years. Will it quiet down with more use? Is there anything that you do to help make it less noisy? I'm nervous if a buck or adult doe gets close that when I draw the bow they will hear it; because I can! I'm excited to see what happens when a big buck or adult doe comes down wind to see their response!
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, I think the hood works fine, but like you, I won't use it unless it is raining or really cold out. The original suit from 2004 didn't have a suit. On rainy days that was a problem and sealing the neck opening was more challenging. A zip off would be nice. It does seem a bit noisier than the predecessor. I don't think it will get quieter with time, but it might. I have not used the current design enough to know what will happen. Silence is likely something we can take up with the next generation of the suit. Products tend to get better over time as the design matures. Personally, I have no problem with the noise level because I don't hardly ever have deer hear me in the tree. It will sound much louder to you than to the deer because your ear is right there next to the suit. On a really still day, it might play a factor on close range deer (you may have to move slower than normal), but under normal hunting conditions, I can't imagine the deer will hear it. Take really good care of the suit and keep it super clean (never handle it with bare hands and don't let it ever touch anything except the ground, natural vegetation and the inside of its scentproof container and you will find that it works to greatly reduce your scent. Good luck. (10-4-12)
  • James from FL asks:
    Bill, just got your scent suit in the mail. I haven't pulled it out of the package yet, so I wanted to find out what you recommend as far as does it need an initial wash, etc. Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    James, I don't think I would wash it first. I would treat it like it is about as clean as it is ever going to be right now and do everything in your power to keep it clean for as long as possible. Don't handle it with your bare hands. Good luck. (10-1-12)
  • Chad from NY asks:
    Bill, Have you gotten any feeback on the scent suit? Good or bad?
    Winke Responds:
    Chad, I have gotten some feedback, both positive and negative. Some people love it and others think it may be too noisy. Personally, I am not worried about the noise, but there is that perception that if it makes any noise at all deer will hear it. I don't buy that as long as you move slow, I don't think they will hear it. Good luck. (10-4-12)
  • LARRY from AL asks:
    I know that you try to control your scent while hunting. Have you thought about using an ozone generator to remove scent from clothing and gear. I know hotels use them to deodorize rooms and restoration companies use them to remove smoke odors in buildings after fires, it is amazing how effective they are. I was thinking of building a clean room (large closet) to put my clothing and gear in and run an ozone generator in it.
    Winke Responds:
    Larry, I think that is a great idea. I think you should do it right away. Good luck. (10-4-12)
  • Rod from NC asks:
    Bill- Awesome show!! Love the "no non-sense" style of filming, instruction and production of your show! Hands down the premiere show for "real hunting." Question:Love the idea of your scent suit...how big are you(height and weight) and what size do you wear? Thanks and my money is on you vs. "Bubba." Safe Hunting-Rod
    Winke Responds:
    Rod, I appreciate the vote of confidence. My money is on Bubba! But I will certainly hunt him hard. I am 6'5" and about 210 pounds now (lost some weight). I will be wearing a XXL this year. Good luck to you this season. (9-24-12)
  • Ryan from IL asks:
    I was just checking out the scent suit today at cabelas and I love it.Just one question. What happens if you tear a hole in them? Most of my hunting cloths end up with a tear or rip in them at some point in there career. If this was to happen would you or have you patched the hole or tear with some kind of vinyl pvc materal from the inside of the overalls? Or how would you go about this? Thanks for your help. I am buying them next week.
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, I would pull it together and patch it with a glue-on patch. I am not sure what would happen if you used an iron-on patch. It might work, but I fear for the membrane without at least testing it to see if it is will melt at that temperature. I wouldn't sew on the patch if at all possible to keep from making holes in the membrane. A wader repair kit is probably the best solution. Thanks for the support and I am glad you liked the suit. Have a great day. (9-21-12)
  • Adam from WI asks:
    Bill, What do you do to reduce breath odors before and during your hunts? Thanks for your input and good luck this year.
    Winke Responds:
    Adam, I don't do anything because I am not convinced that deer associate human breath odor with humans. Maybe they do, but I have done some extreme tests with complete odor elimination and have seen some very good success even though I did nothing with my breath. I suppose my testing may not be adequate so if you want to know what to try, a good solution would be to carry a few apples with you and eat one every hour or so. That will keep you from getting hungry and will help to keep your breath fresh. Good luck. (9-28-12)
  • Kris from OH asks:
    For the past ten years I have been using a carbon suit for scent control. I am extremely cautious with all aspects of controlling my scent. However I still get busted every now and then and at the wrong times it seems. This year I am tempted to use a cover scent like fox or coon urine, it just makes me a little nervous what do you think? Thank you
    Winke Responds:
    Kris, I think it is OK to try as long as you never put it on your clothing or hang it from your clothing. Keep it separate so you can stop using it easily if it doesn't work. Consider putting it on a tree step near your stand, for example. I am not sure how well that will work, to be honest, because I have never tried it. I have always been the one that tried to completely capture scent rather than cover it. Let me know if it honestly works. Good luck. (9-26-12)
  • Rodney from MI asks:
    Bill Just ordered the scent containment suit and no info on how it is insulated or not. I am concerned that it might be to warm for early season hunting or to light for late season. Keep the good work up on the show really enjoy it. Rodney
    Winke Responds:
    Rodney, It will be warm if the temperature is above 70 degrees. I always keep the top down until the last 1 1/2 hours of the day in the early season to keep cool. It won't be too light for late season because you can layer under it very effectively and being one-piece and windproof, it is surprisingly warm for as light as it is. Good luck. (9-21-12)
  • Phil from IL asks:
    Bill, First off I would like to say I'm a huge fan of your website and all of the information/tips you provide on your show. I have seen and read about your scent containment suit that you use. I would like to know more about your scent control routine. Do you shower with a scent eliminating soap? Wash your clothing in scent eliminating detergent? Do you spray down with a scent eliminator before heading to the field? I'm really interested in what other scent control tactics you use other than using your scent containment suit. Thanks, Phil
    Winke Responds:
    Phil, I shower with scentfree soap and shampoo and I do wash my clothing in scent free detergent, but just as importantly, I use an easy cleaning detergent (Sport Wash) for the scent containment suit and I hang it outside to dry. I never run it through the dryer. I also never touch it with my hands. I always wear clean, freshly washed gloves. I figure if it contains the odors and doesn't smell itself, I am on my way to beating most of the deer most of the time. I keep my hair short in the fall to reduce the places where scent can hide and wash my hat just as often as possible to keep it from picking up hair odors. I shower twice per day. Of couse, I never wear any of my outerwear until I get to the place where I start walking, including my boots. I hope that helps. Good luck. (9-19-12)
  • Matt from KS asks:
    Bill I was thinking about using a sauna suit to contain my body odor under my hunting clothes. Do you think this will work? It works great on holding sweat inside the suit when working out.
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, Yes, I do think it will work as long as you seal all the openings fairly well. Just make sure that whatever you wear over it is super clean and that you never handle it with your hands, etc. Once you know (or think) you have your scent locked in, the odors on the outerwear itself is the key to your success. Good luck. (9-18-12)
  • Charles from NC asks:
    Bill, your scent elimination process have really got me to thinking about things a lot lately. For that and your great site I thank you. Two questions, do you take any precaution with bath towels such how they are washed or stored? Lastly, what type of shaving cream do you use? I have yet to find a good truly unscented solution.
    Winke Responds:
    Charles, I wash the bath towels in my wash machine and dry them in my dryer up in my office (old junky ones that my wife would never let in the house!) And I wash them in unscented detergent. I wouldn't use fabric softener if you are serious about this. The containment suit will hold in a lot of odors, but the cleaner you stay inside it, the less that gets out through places like the neck opening if it is not tight and you raise and lower your arms. Just try that sometime. You can feel the air pumping out. I use a shaving cream for sensitive skin that doesn't have any perfumes in it. I then wash my face after shaving with unscented hand soap. That is as close as I can get. I have shaved without cream, but you have to do it every day to keep the whiskers short and you have to do it immediately after stepping from the shower while the whiskers are still waterlogged and soft. Good luck. (9-14-12)
  • Justin from OH asks:
    Bill, I love your show and think you are doing a great job for the sport of deer hunting. I have a question about your containment suit. Is it just an outer wear suit that you just use over your normal hunting clothing that you take afield? I am looking to purchase a new suit for this upcoming season and after watching your shows and seeing a suit that you helped design, I am quite interested. Thanks for your time and I wish you continued success whether in business or afield. Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Justin, Thanks for the support. No, I only wear underwear under it. I wear long underwear or the equivalent and just use the suit as the outerwear. It is light weight but windproof. You don't need to wear a lot under it until it gets cold. Good luck. (9-13-12)
  • Nate from IL asks:
    Hey Bill love the show and all of the info you have available I was wondering if im useing a creek to travel into my stand do i need to spray my boots with scent killer before i go in along the creek and after i get out by my stand or if the water washes away any foreign and human scent and i should be fine thanx
    Winke Responds:
    Nate, It never hurts, but if you walking in water all the way to the stand your ground scent will be eliminated by the water - but I am guessing that is not the case. I would be sure to keep the scent elimination steps because the greatest ground scent comes not from the boots, but from where your pants rub on the low vegetation. So I would do all you can (including clearing away low brush) to make the last walk from the creek to the stand as scent free as possible. Good luck. (9-12-12)
  • Steve from WI asks:
    Bill, I'm getting pumped for deer season and all the new MW shows! I have a question about the scent suit. I usually wear a XL in my other hunting gear. It's usually a little big on me but I like the extra room for layers and movement. When I can afford one of your suits ( soon I hope!) do you think I should get the XL? Just wondering how the fit is? Thanks Bill
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, I think if the XL is a bit loose on you already, that is the best choice. I like the suit a bit loose because you can always wear a belt tight around your waist make it fit comfortably even if it is a touch big. I would rather go too big than risk going too small on this suit. Good luck. (9-10-12)
  • MoBilly from MO asks:
    Mr Winke I have a few questions about your suit. First questions is, is this going to be a one time deal on the suit or due you expect cableas to have more next year. Second in the videos you seem to be above the avg. in height and I was wondering what size you are wearing due to the fact I am tall my self and will need a bigger suit to be comfortable. The bouns tip videos I thought were great. Your are doing a great job, love what you are doing,so keep it up.
    Winke Responds:
    Mo- They will keep carrying it beyond this year. I am 6' 5" and about 215 pounds - I wear a XXL. I wore a XXL tall in the version we created back in 2004, but they don't offer tall sizes this time (at least not this year). I think the XXL will be fine for me, but if you are much taller than that, it may not fit very well. I appreciate all the support. Good luck this fall. (9-12-12)
  • Tom from OH asks:
    Hey Bill, Been really studying up on your scent containment suit. I want to know if the gloves and hat are imperative for its success or not? I am like you, I like cheap jersey gloves that I can always have a clean pair and I have a lucky hat! Please tell me if they are MUST haves. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, I don't believe the gloves are a must as long as you have something clean on your hands every time you go out, but you do need to have something on your head to keep hair odor, and other head-related odors, in check. If you have another system that you believe in, you will probably be OK, but you do need to control the odors that come from your hair. I keep mine very short in the season and wash it twice per day, but I still don't think that is enough. You need to cover it with something that holds the odors in. A good hat that stops the odor is fine - or even a skull cap like the swimmers wear under a typical poly/cotton hat. I have a friend who does that. Good luck. (8-31-12)
  • robert from NJ asks:
    Hey Bill, I just watched your episode on patterning the G4 buck, and I noticed while you were going threw food sources available you were wearing hiking type boots. I was under the impression that this is a bad move while scouting (leaving your scent) Now I just watched the Great Lakes show and again the dude had leather boots on! I don't know about you guys but scent control is huge to me while I can only hunt public land..Why no rubber boots guys???
    Winke Responds:
    Robert, These deer confront human activity all summer in my food plots and along the field edges. There is no place I hunt where the deer don't encounter human scent on the fringes of their ranges. However, the keys is what you do during the season and where you leave that scent during that time or just before it. You will see me get a lot more careful once I start to scout and pattern beginning in mid-September. Then I take every precaution to eliminate all odors. By the way, everyone thinks that rubber boots are scent free. I contend that when properly used and stored, even nylon boots can be scent free. Good luck (9-3-12)
  • Jeremy from IA asks:
    Bill, I was wondering what your opinion was on scent elimination sprays? I personally feel a little foolish for once believing that spraying a mist of the stuff on my clothes was going to reduce odor. Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Jeremy, I think it can help in some cases where you are trying to gum up or kill odors in a specific spot, but to really eliminate all odors you would need to spray down pretty heavily. In most cases, the chemistry is there to support the claims, but peopel just don't spray it on thick enough. I am not sure how saturated your clothing would have to be, but a lot wetter than what most people think. I see it as a temporary solution until the odors work their way back through again from the inside. Good luck. (9-3-12)
  • Joel from AR asks:
    Hey bill love the show hope yall keep up all the hard work. When putting leaves in my water proof bag should they still be green, or already turned leaves. Hope yall have a great year and good luck.
    Winke Responds:
    Joel, You want brown, dry leaves or you will introduce the chance for midew from the moisture. Also, if you have Cedar trees in your area, the cedar boughs are also a good choice. Good luck. (8-29-12)
  • Ethan from KY asks:
    Bill, I cant wait for the new shows to start! My question is about scent control. I was wondering what you do, if anything, to make your hunting vehicle more scent neutral? I feel like no matter what steps I take to keep my body and my hunting clothes scent free, the ride in my truck and putting gear in my truck is contaminating it. All year long I haul everything in the bed of my pickup, from feed and fence posts, to chainsaws and gas cans. Then deer season comes and Im putting treestands, boots, and other gear in there. Your thoughts?
    Winke Responds:
    Ethan, I don't do anything there but I never wear my outerwear in the truck nor my boots. I think you have to place the gear in totes. I do that. I guess if you are really serious about it you could buy vinyl seat covers and keep them scrubbed clean. That would help to keep scent off your under garments. I never anything on my tree stands that can hold scent either - I remove the seats and anything cloth. They don't soak up scents very quickly even laying in the back of my truck. Good luck. (8-28-12)
  • Joel from AR asks:
    Hi bill love the show, so glad the new shows have started. When you put the leaves in the bag of clothes, are they green or brown? mite be a dumb question but i just want to get the system right. Keep up all the hard work you and the guys go threw, i know its tuff, thanks joel.
    Winke Responds:
    Joel, Thanks for the support. Definitely brown and very dry. You don't want anything wet in their or you will get some mildew over time. Have a great day. (8-27-12)
  • Ben from ON asks:
    Hey Bill love the show and excited for the new season. I had a question about the scent containment suit, is it possible to get it in a tall size? I am 6' 5'', and sometimes have problems with the legs being to short with my hunting garments. i know you are tall as well, do you wear a regular size or tall? Thanks, happy hunting this fall!!
    Winke Responds:
    Ben, I don't see tall sizes. I am 6'5" too and will likely end up getting the next size bigger so that it is has plenty of room inside. I expect I will have a XXL here soon. I wish they had talls, but this will probably work fine too. Good luck. (8-24-12)
  • Rodney Porter from OK asks:
    Is your new Cabela's suit thin enough for early season hunts - similar to the Scent-Lok Savanna? You and your staff do an amazing job! Easily the most authentic, informative deer hunting program on TV! Major League BH a distant second.
    Winke Responds:
    Rodney, It is not going to be as breathable as the Savanna for sure so it will be hotter in warm weather. I wear mine early in the season but I often leave the top down until the last 90 minutes of the day. Thanks for your support. I appreciate the kind words and I enjoy the Major League BH show too. Have a great day. (8-24-12)
  • James from MN asks:
    Bill, Love the show! Have you ever used the Nose Jammer product before (www.nosejammer.com)? I've recently read a number of reviews that sound promising, but the whole concept is contrary to my general philosophy to reduce as much scent as possible. I'm thinking of giving it a try, but I hate to take a chance of screwing up my area. What do you think? Thanks, James
    Winke Responds:
    James, I have some and I talked to the guy that developed it at length one day on the phone. It seems to have some possibilities, but I have never thoroughly tested it so I can't say for sure. I am like you, I like to keep the wind in my favor and do all I can to keep scent from reaching the deer - all scent. But if the vanillin truly is an accepted scent to deer then maybe it does work effectively as a cover scent. I know they say it jams the nose, but I would have to see that to believe it. Again, it may work awesome, I have just never tested it. Good luck. (8-20-12)
  • Kevin from AL asks:
    Bill, When I submitted some questions earlier today, I forgot to ask what size Cabelas scent suit you would recommend to order if you are 6'1" and weigh about 230#? I, like you, do not like my hunting clothes too tight especially when you need to layer beneath the suit. Are these suits really quiet when drawing your bow on a Whitetail? Thanks in advance for the help with these questions?
    Winke Responds:
    Kevin, I have not tested the fit of the new suits. The old one we made back in 2004 would be a XXL. That is what I have been wearing. I am 6' 5" and about 210 now. I was up to 235 for several years. I wore a XXL Tall. Not sure if they make it in tall now. Yes, they are pretty quiet. They are not as quiet as fleece, but I have shot tons of deer wearing mine and I can say I have never had a deer spook from the sound of the garment. Good luck. (8-20-12)
  • Jeff from MO asks:
    Do you wear your Cabelas scent suit in early season when it's warm? Do you use your scent suit during the early season or is the suit too warm to wear in the early days of the season?
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I do wear it early, but I only wear a thin underliner underneath it. It would be too warm for a lot of people, but I am so convinced in the way it works that I am not worried about being a bit warm when hunting early. I usually keep the top down until the last hour and a half of the day. That helps to keep me cool. Good luck. (8-20-12)
  • Charles from NC asks:
    Bill, I have read that in the past you used rubber waders for scent containment on your entry and exit routes. What are your thoughts on using a breathable pair instead? Lastly, I watched your video on scent containment and I really like the idea of the cotton gloves. Can you explain that anymore? How often would you swap out gloves if you were checking multiple camera sites on different farms?
    Winke Responds:
    Charles, Some of those breathable waders don't contain scent very well. I have done the testing using ammonia capsules and some of them don't hold scent. However, they would sure be lighter and more comfortable than what I was wearing. It would be worth trying for sure. It might be enough to keep the scent down for entry and exit even if it doesn't 100% contain it. I would swap the gloves once per session but I would take them off and put them somewhere odor free when not in the field - like traveling from place to place. Of all the stuff I carry into the woods or wear, I would say my gloves are probably the least "secure" but it is not practical to wear rubber gloves all the time. I have tried it, it is a pain. Good luck. (8-6-12)
  • Fred from IL asks:
    REALLY enjoy the quality of the content you provide. Keep up the great work. I watched the scent control segment and was wondering about the jersey gloves. How long will you wear a pair, for a hunt, a day, a couple days? When you are done with a pair do you put them to the side and wash a bunch of them you start getting low? Do you run these through the dryer? You said you don't run outer wear through the dryer, but are these an exception. Stuff does not line dry to fast by me in Nov/Dec. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
    Winke Responds:
    Fred, Thanks for your support. I appreciate it. I wear them for just one hunt. I keep a tub of them in the shop and grab a fresh pair every time I head out to hunt. I wash them about once per week, - a big wad of them. I do run them through the drier. I know that goes against my ideal situation of line drying everything, but it is not practical sometimes to line dry the gloves. It is the only piece of outerwear that I have that I dry in the drier. Have a great day. (8-4-12)
  • cameron from AB asks:
    Hi there Bill, im looking forward to the 2012 season of MWW!!!! I have two questions for you, First of all i have heard people say that they mow down the clover when it gets to long and I was wondering why? Also I noticed you dont wear rubber boots for hunting, why do you not wear them for sent control? Thanks Bill
    Winke Responds:
    Cameron, Thanks for the support. You do that for two reasons: 1. reduce weed competition, 2. cause the clover to grow back with lusher, more tender growth that deer prefer to the mature, stemmy plants you are cutting down. I have had very good success with the Gore-Tex Scent-Lok boots from Cabela's. I don't believe they actually have carbon in them, but a membrane that holds odor in. I like lace up boots because they are much more comfortable for me to walk in and I find them to be warmer too. I realize most people use rubber boots and there is no reason to switch, but I am not getting busted on ground scent on my walk-in trails as long as I don't brush against vegetation with my pants or jacket. Regardless of the boot, you have to keep them clean and only wear them while hunting (not in the vehicle, etc.). Good luck. (8-1-12)
  • Ken from WI asks:
    Hi Bill! I emailed you earlier regarding your scent containment suit. I see your containment suit is now available through Cablela's. My question before I order the suit is the Carbon filters?? Obviously, head cover is very important;a lot of scent is created by your head. Do you recommend the containment headcover and carbon filters,even though you were not satisfied with the carbon suits? Activated carbon replacement cartridges seems to contradict your earlier statements regarding this process. Perhaps I'm not following what the coverall replacement cartridges function has with the containment suit! Thanks for your advice! I'm excited about the suit! Ken
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, I don't love the hood and I won't use the carbon masks. They may work, but there are issues with that (breath may go up and fog glasses and binos, etc.). I think that may be more for marketing than for pure necessity. I do like the optional headcover, but I will likely just use the hood for rain days and keep the neck opening pulled up snug so air isn't coming and going from that opening. To be honest with you, I am not even convinced that deeer are afraid of human breath odor. That is just me though. Others may see it differently. Good luck. (7-31-12)
  • Jake Harris from MO asks:
    We're still waiting to check out the scent controll suit. Your last post was in late June and I don't see it on the Cabela's site. When does the Fall Catalog come out and what will the suit be called or labeled as?
    Winke Responds:
    Jake, It is on the site. Here is the link: http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Scent-Seal-Scent-Containment-Suit/1381083.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Ntk%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dsuper%2Bseal%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts%26x%3D13%26y%3D4&Ntt=super+seal&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products (copy and paste into your browser). They also offer gloves and headwear to go with the suit. Thanks and good luck. (7-30-12)
  • shawn from WI asks:
    hi. i was wondering if anyone on your staff wears scentblocker clothing . also is it true you should only use scent blocker scent eliminators sprays and soaps on there suits or they will be ruined.we just got about 4 inches of rain in south easteren wisconsin hopefully the crops will respond corn and beans look pretty good .i seen the pictures of the g4 buck looks nice bill .well thanks for your time .good luck hunting and god bless.
    Winke Responds:
    Shawn, I am sure that we have some guys wearing the Scent Blocker but I have not heard that you have to use their detergent. I think it is wise, but I think other detergents designed for carbon (I have used Sport Wash) will also work. You can use any sprays. No problem there at all. Man, four inches of rain sounds pretty good right about now. Good luck. (7-30-12)
  • Brian from PA asks:
    Bill: What brand of scent control deodorant, field spray, body wash, clothing detergent, etc do you use? This is a priority in my book when attempting to bag the big boy.
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I keep things simple. I don't have a specific brand. I do like the HS shampoo and soap and use unscented Sure from the grocery store. That does a good job. For clothing I currently use Scent Blocker for my underlayers, but for my outerwear I only use Sport Wash. I haven't been using much field spray lately. I am really funny about what I put on the outside of my clothing system. I need to experiment to determine which one does the job without producing its own odor. Good luck. (7-23-12)
  • Jake from WI asks:
    Bill, Thanks again for all you do on this site to make us all better hunters. Just a couple of quick questions for you - How long do you think clover plots are attractive to deer in northern WI? Second, with your scent suit, how effective do you think it is? With only one person in the tree (no cameraman) do you trust it enough to "forget the wind and just hunt?" The property I hunt doesn't have a lot of bullet proof setups so being winded can always be a problem. I'm always looking for something better in scent control.
    Winke Responds:
    Jake, I think the clover will be attractive until after a couple of hard freezes. My guess is about mid November to around Thanksgiving, probably, in that area. The suit has proven to be better for me than anything else I have tried, but I still would play the wind. If you do a really good job of keeping the suit clean from any contamination I think you will fool most of the deer most of the time, but not all of the deer all of the time. I think it is better, but I am a bit biased, of course. Good luck. (7-23-12)
  • Charlie from NY asks:
    Mr. Winkie I just saw the Wink suit on Cabelas site and it looks great. Just wondering if you can do a video showing all the features and how the system works? Charlie
    Winke Responds:
    Charlie, Thanks. I believe we have done two of them. Here are the links to those two. These won't be live so you will have to cut and paste into your browser. http://www.midwestwhitetail.com/gallery/117/media/4160/mwoffseason1214-scent-control-101.html Here is the second one: http://www.midwestwhitetail.com/gallery/96/media/3717/mw1114-cruising-bucks.html Thanks for the interest. (7-20-12)
  • James from FL asks:
    Bill, just got my Cabelas fall catalog hot off of the presses and saw the scent suit in there. They are selling gloves with it as well. Will you stick with the jersey gloves or go over the the scent gloves? Looking foward to purchasing one this year!
    Winke Responds:
    James, Good deal. I haven't seen it yet, so I will have to take a look at the gloves. I didn't have any input into the gloves. As long as they don't grab the bow too badly, I am sure I will use them. Thanks for the support. (7-20-12)
  • Aaron from MN asks:
    Thanks for the great website and sharing your knowledge. I am looking forward to the scent containment suit coming out soon. I saw your show on your process to keep your outerwear from being contaminated. My question is: after wearing the suit, how many days do you wear before washing? Do you just let in hang outside after wearing in between hunts? Have you done any testing on whether washing and air drying outside remove human odor to an acceptable level? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Aaron, I wash it about every four or five days. I do let it hang outside between wearings. I think it is good to keep it aired out. I seriously doubt that washing will remove all odor. I have not seen that. It is why I think you need to handle it so carefully. I think washing can clean off some of the contamination, but not all of it. I think Ozone might be a better overall cleaner. I am going to experiment with that this year. I think air drying is much better than running it through the dryer though. Good luck. (7-19-12)
  • Tom from OH asks:
    Bill, Did you ever have any results from testing that washing machine add-on product "Pure Wash" that you discussed in March. Just curious of its effectiveness. Saw that the thing is about $450! Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, All of my results so far are anecdotal. In other words, based on experience and opinion. I accidentally left some clothes in there for three days after the wash was done. Normally, in the past, that has spelled stinky clothing with the bacteria that gets into wet clothing in a wash machine. This time they smelled just fine! I was pretty surprised at that. I will try to come up with some kind of actual scientific test because it does show good promise. I would just hate to recommend it just yet until I test it correctly. Good luck (7-14-12)
  • Tom from OH asks:
    Hey Bill, I took your advise and bought the Cabela's Boundary Backpack. I think it will be great for my hunting clothes. It does have a rubber smell (like a inner tube)especially in the interior. I have set it out in the sun, sprayed it with scent sprays and I can still smell it. Any other suggestions on how to remove the smell? I think that even if there is a little rubber smell its not as alarming as some human and other foreign odors that would get on the clothes if it was not in a bag like this. Thanks for your help.
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, I would give it a few days in the sun turned inside out. That is what I did. I also washed it very thoroughly (scrubbed it with a coarse brush) with unscented soap and then let it sit inside out over a post for a few more days. That evaporated most of the oils. Then I filled it up with leaves and cedar boughs and stuff like that for a few days and then set it out in the sun inside out again for a few more days. That eventually gets rid of almost all of the odors. You are right, the PVC smell is not as bad as human odor, but it is still a foreign odor in the deer woods and you need to reduce it as much as possible. In my experience, you will get it taken care of before season. Then during the fall, fill it 1/3 full with dry leaves for the entire season. Seems like a lot of trouble to get the odors out of these kinds of bags, but I like the heavy PVC bags because they are super durable and you can toss them into the back of the truck without any worry that they will leak odors to the inside or tear, etc. Good luck. (7-6-12)
  • Matthew from OK asks:
    Hey Bill, I am taking great precautions with my scent this season because ive had problems with deer winding me. Do you spray your bow with scent killer as well? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, Yes, I do. It is white by the end of the season! Best of luck. (6-28-12)
  • shawn from WI asks:
    hi. i was wondering what you used for detergent when washing your clothes and also what you use for field spray. i was looking at scent blocker products cause of the carbon suit and also the bone collector products .just looking what your input would be too use. thanks. keep up the good work i love your show and really like that hunters can get help from you on your sites for tips. great info
    Winke Responds:
    Shawn, Thanks for supporting the show and the website. I have used the Sport Wash from Atsko for the detergent and I am not actively using an eliminator spray. I need to find one that makes the most sense to me. I have always try to rely on just keeping the clothing extremely clean, but that doesn't always work. I am undecided on the spray. Have a great day. (6-27-12)
  • jason from OH asks:
    Bill, one more question and I'll leave you alone for a while, ha! I have a nice wooden box blind I constructed, cracks sealed to the max, and placed in a prime crossing through a gas line clear cut. Has worked VERY well as a gun stand and I leave it alone until December. This year, three decent bucks and a 140 class herded back up and I always saw them together. I passed many times on the 140 but this deer did not seem to wind me or care. In January a huge 150 or better joined these and followed the cues of the smaller bucks. Bought an Ozonics just to test it and returned it, didn't work for me. I have an air tight box and even duct taped the plexiglass windows except for one, I had everything on the Ozonics set perfectly (boost mode over my head and blowing out the open window in a light wind), same reaction, 140 class didn't care, the other four (including the bruiser) were skittish. They also seemed to not care earlier in the season and seemed to wind me more from the blind as the s
    Winke Responds:
    Jason, Your question got cut off. I will try to add a few comments anyway. If you had two windows open it is very hard to keep your scent inside. If you have one open it easier for sure, but ideally you can keep them all closed and possibly shoot through clear plastic wrap (if bowhunting) or at least wear hearing protection if you shoot the gun with the end of the barrel inside the blind. Normally, we have pretty good success (not perfect) with just one window open but too much better with all of them closed. I have not experimented with the Ozonics so I can't weigh in on that one. Good luck. (6-26-12)
  • Ben from MO asks:
    Bill, I'm a big fan of the show and have been watching since way back in 08. My question is in response to a comment you made in your 'staying scent free episode' a few weeks back. What is the benefit of a person having shorter hair vs. longer hair? I had actually been letting mine grow an extra 1-2 inches and growing a beard to take some of the bite off those Dec. winds but now may need to rethink that. Once again love the show, (although with all the new episodes it's much harder to stay up to date than it used to be) thank you for your hard work, and hope you are enjoying your well deserved time off.
    Winke Responds:
    Ben, Thanks for the support. I appreciate it. Hair has a lot of human odor in it and it traps odors that blow off easily with the wind when you are hunting. I understand the long hair and beard, but you are truly adding more scent and creating more places for the scent to hide until it blows off while hunting. If you are serious about being scent-free - the long hair and the beard have to go. I am not sure how much difference it makes, but if your head is the only thing outside your scent containing cocoon, it has to make a lot of difference. Good luck. (6-25-12)
  • Seth from IN asks:
    Hey Bill, I got one more question for you. I was reading the questions about the ground blinds and you said that you can cover them with reynolds rap. You said it works for bows, but what about a gun? It may sound like a stupid question but just curious, thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Seth, We cover the windows, not the entire blind, but yes you can shoot through that with a gun too. Good luck. (6-25-12)
  • Seth from IN asks:
    Hey Bill, I don't have the non odorless shower or deoderant... So would I be better off not wearing my ordinary deoderant? Or should I wear deoderant? Which will make the bucks not smell me as much?
    Winke Responds:
    Seth, I guess I wouldn't use it if it is perfumned. Unscented Sure does a good job and it is available at grocery stores. Good luck. (6-25-12)
  • Jared from IN asks:
    This is a follow up to your rubber boots vs. leather boots response. Several follow up questions: 1) You (Bill) are extremely disciplined with avoiding scent contamination of your clothing and boots, whereas, although we try to be, most people are not quite as disciplined. Do you feel that rubber boots would better avoid soaking up odors for the average hunter who may periodically wear them places we shouldn't (truck, four-wheeler, etc.)? Additionally, if the average hunter is not as disciplined with his outerwear (pants), it seems that taller rubber boots would be beneficial to prevent the outerwear (tucked in) from touching vegetation. Thoughts? 2) What about foot sweat/smell? Have you not had any problems with leather boots (even ScentLok) allowing some odor to escape? It seems logical that rubber boots, although they may make you sweat more, would do a better job at containment. 3) It seems that new leather boots stink just as bad as new rubber boots - are you inferring
    Winke Responds:
    Jared, I think anyone can be disciplined. Just always do what you know you should do. Don't get lazy. I do think rubber is less likely to soak up odors, for sure. I don't think the rubber boots are high enough to accomplish your notion of keeping your pants off all the low vegetation, but definitely better than the lace up boots. I am not acually wearing leather boots. I am wearing Cordura Nylon boots. I am not sure about leather. But I know what you are saying. You need to leave the boots in an open tub in the back of your truck or trunk so that they can air out between uses. If you close them in with the foot odor smells, you run the rik of having that odor absorbed into the outer part of the boots. Also, if you wear clean socks every day, you have much less chance of foot odors ever occuring. Again, I don't wear leather. Once you break in a set of Cordura boots, most of the odor is gone. Wear them only outside and walk through creeks and leave them in the sun to bake a few times. They shed their odor fairly fast. There is no doubt that rubber will work fine once the manufacturing odor wears off - I just don't like wearing it and the boots I have been wearing aren't detected by deer and are a lot more comfortable. Good luck. (6-21-12)
  • Shanner from IN asks:
    Hi Bill, My question is simple – my understanding has always been that it is universally accepted among the hunting community that rubber boots are optimal for scent control. I do not believe that I have ever noted an avid bowhunter who does not always use rubber boots, until I started watching your programs. As a sufferer of fallen arches and a past broken foot, I can definitely understand the comfort benefits of a quality fitted leather boot over a slip on rubber boot. However, I have always as a matter of course suffered through sore feet in the name of “scent control.” Therefore, I am more than interested in your choice of footwear. Is this a rare case where comfort wins over function or do you have research or past experience to support not always wearing knee-high rubber boots? Could you shed some light on the scent control aspects of rubber vs. leather boots? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Shanner, No, it is not just comfort though that factors in. Cordura Nylon is not necessarily stinky. Is rubber stinky? Yes it is. As long as I never take the cordura boots into smelly places or wear them in my truck (I only wear them when hunting and take them off at the truck) I don't have a problem with ground scent. I could write a book about what I have seen regarding scent control over the years, but there is not time or room. The greatest source of ground scent is where your garments rub against low vegetation. The Cordura boots (I use the Gore-Tex Scent Lok ones which are essentially Gore's old Supprescent - basically used for containment since the odor can't get through the membrane) will hold your scent in. Good luck. (6-20-12)
  • Joe from ME asks:
    Bill, Love the shows. I learn something new everytime I watch one. Saw something the other day about using smoke as a cover scent. The gentleman used a honey bee smoker on his outer garments, he also said that smoke is a good antimicrobial. Does this sound plausable or is this guy just blowing smoke?
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, I think it is plausible. I am not sure on the antimicrobial, but that might be true too. I do know that smoke does make an effective cover (no cover scent is 100% effective so use caution). Good luck. (6-12-12)
  • mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, With the new scent containment suit you and cabelas are coming out with will there be a mask/hat and gloves that go with it.
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, They will have some kind of gloves, not sure on the hat right away. I have a production suit but I don't have the accessories so I am unsure at this time what they will have in the line. Some of this I had a good bit of feedback on and some of it I didn't. I never got involved at all on the accessories. Have a great day. (6-11-12)
  • shawn from WI asks:
    hi. i was wondering does the scent lok or scent blocker clothes really work . or is over priced camo im looking forward too the suit i heard about that cabelas will be carrying . thank you.
    Winke Responds:
    Shawn, I won't comment too much on the carbon clothing. I have not worn it since 2001. It never worked very well for me at that time. It may have gotten better since then and I may have been doing something wrong, but for all practical purposes the deer were still smelling me most of the time. I am sure it does eliminate some scent, the way I was doing it, it just didn't remove enough. Thanks for the support. Have a great day. (6-11-12)
  • Mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, what makes your scent containment suit better than a scent lok charcoal suit or a scent blocker carbon suit. Will it work as good or better then those types of suits. thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I think it works better. Others over the years who have tested it said the same thing. Cabela's only made 1,800 of them on the first go around, so not a lot of folks got to purchase them at that time. I have worn it for a number of years and wouldn't part with it. I even turned down other companies that came along offering to be apparel sponsors. I was afraid I would have to stop wearing the suit. It works because it is very simple, it bottles up the odors inside the garment. It doesn't try to filter the scent molecules or break them down or neutralize them. It just keeps them inside. Have a great day. (6-11-12)
  • Ted from MO asks:
    Bill: You've indicated that you wear Cabela's odor containment clothing while hunting, and that you don't wear charcoal lined hunting apparel. Why containment clothing and not charcoal clothing? Thanks. Ted
    Winke Responds:
    Ted, If the air can't escape the garment it is hard for the scent to escape. That is the basic principle behind containment versus absorbing, neutralizing or adsorbing. Simply bottle up the odors. That doesn't require any complex science to make it work or any real faith to trust it. It is a very simple principle - just don't let it out. You don't have to recharge it or anything like that. As long as you can keep the outside of the garment from being contaminated, it will work very well. Best regards (6-11-12)
  • Ted from LA asks:
    Bill: Do you wear any form of charcoal lined or scent control clothing? If so, do you keep it in your Cabela's waterproof bag with the leaves and cedar cuttings? If so, is the charcoal being used up by absorbing the odors? Thank you for all the time you invest in answering so many questions.
    Winke Responds:
    Ted, I don't wear any charcoal clothing but I do wear a containment suit I worked with Cabeala's on back in 2003/2004. We are bringing out a new version of that this fall. To andwer your question, I would not ever use any cover scent in the same scentproof storage bag with charcoal. As you say, the scents will filter into the charcoal and fill the pores of the charcoal so it is not effective on other odors. Have a great day. (6-7-12)
  • Jacob from MI asks:
    Dr. Winke, Love the show and the honest input. I've written in before an appreciate all of the information you share from your experience. So like I said Dr. Winke you've talked about not touching clothing and equipment, I love shooting but don't always wear gloves, do I need to wipe my bow down come hunting season. If so do you recommend anything, or is it to late to get "scent free"? Also I bought an Ozone Generator, I haven't used it, but hoping that I can use it in stead of constantly washing exterior hunting clothes (by putting them in a tote and running the machine, not the kind that goes in the stand with you). Again thanks for the help
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, I must be the Doctor of Doing Things the Hard way, because I certainly am not a doctor of anything else! I appreciate it though. You can do a pretty good job of deodorizing your bow simply by spraying with scent elminator. Because the bow has a smooth finish it won't absorb much odor so it is fairly easy to get cleaned up. Clothing is much tougher because all the surface area in clothing makes it absorb odors much more effectively. The ozone generator for clothing I think is a very, very good idea. As I just said, it is really hard to get clothing totally scent free once contaminated and the ozone has the best chance of doing that (much better than detergent). Let us know how that works. I have thought of doing that often. Thanks and good luck. (6-6-12)
  • Luke from MI asks:
    Hey Bill last year i ripped my scent lok bag pulling it out of my truck and this year I was going to get something new what do you use and would earth scent wafers be a good idea to put with my clothing?
    Winke Responds:
    Luke, I use one of the Boundary Waters Bags from Cabela's. They are big waterproof, scentproof bags, very durable too. I would simply put dry leaves in the bag each fall (or cedar boughs if you have them in your area). That will help with any cover scent. If you are using any charcoal clothing, I would not use any kind of cover scent in the bag. Good luck. (6-5-12)
  • Brandon from MO asks:
    Bill, I use a scent lok tote bag to store my hunting clothes in season. It is carbon activated for scent containment. In the season, should I be storing it in my garage, or in my basement storage inside my home? Basement storage area is dry, cool and surrounded by concrete enclosed walls. Just curious which one would be the best environment. Thanks. -Brandon
    Winke Responds:
    Brandon, I would put the whole thing in a big plastic tote duriing the off-season (as long as you know it is dry) to prevent any problem with mildew if it gets too wet from condensation after humid days or just general moisture. Then I think keep it away from any external odors. Good luck. (6-1-12)
  • Jeff from MO asks:
    Bill, You guys are doing awesome work at MW thanks for all the great footage and storytelling, as well as the tips on strategy and scent control. My question is what do you think about "peeing" from the stand. Do you think that they associate or urine with human presence? Obviously you want to cut your scent down as much as possible but what are your methods regarding this while hunting?
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I think it is totally fine. I am certain they don't associate the urine odor with human odor as I have been doing this for many, many years without any negative reactions from the deer. Good luck. (5-31-12)
  • Mitchell from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, Do you still wear your scent containment suit when it is hot out. Is it to hot to wear in the warm september weather in Minnesota. Great show keep up the good work.
    Winke Responds:
    Mitchell, I do, but I am more concerned with scent control than I am about comfort. It would be warm for sure that eary in the season. If you think it is too warm, you can always shelf it until the temps get below 70. Thanks for the support. Have a great day. (5-31-12)
  • Randy from PA asks:
    Hi Bill, What soap product, shampoo, deordorant do you use for scent control when you shower,(personal scent control hygene products)? For your footwear, what gram insulation do you recommend for early, mid, and late season hunting to keep your feet warm while in the tree stand? Thanks for the off season and turkey hunting show, very enjoyable and informative. Have a great summer!---rcs
    Winke Responds:
    Randy, I think I have been using Scent Shield brand soaps, deodorants and shampoo, but many others are good too. Muddy just came out with some of these products in their Xecute line. Mostly, I like the soaps and shampoos that don't have an odor. If they smell (unless there is a good reason for it) I feel that it is leaving scent residue. I think the boots were 400 gram early season, 800 gram mid season and the late season was a pack book with felt and the whole nine yards. Those were the Saskatchewan boot from Cabela's. I have used them for years and they are warmest I have tried so far. Good luck. (5-31-12)
  • Matthew from OK asks:
    Bill, I appreciate your videos on clover plots. I am experimenting with them this year and so far they've been doing great. I have a couple of questions. I want to put a mineral block in with my plot since it's infront of my camera, but im not sure if the minerals running off from rain will destroy the clover. Second, is it that big of a deal to worry about scent control to and from your camera this early in the year? thanks, Matt
    Winke Responds:
    Matthew, I don't worry about scent control at this time of the year especially in open areas. I don't go deep into the cover. I guess if I was going to do that, I would worry about it more. Also, I would place the mineral to the side of the plot, not in it. The deer will eventually make a big hole where the block is and you will have to farm around that in the future. The edge is better. Good luck. (5-24-12)
  • James from FL asks:
    Bill, how do you feel and what do you do in regards to washing your clothes, and showering during the off season? Do you wash your clothes that you work on your farm in with scent-free soap, and do you shower with scentless soap during the off season since you are working on your property, checking trail cams, hanging stands, etc. Do you use scentless deodorant during the off season? I read an article where the writer does this and just wanted to get your thoughts on this. Also, want to reminding you about getting those decals printed and on the website. Thanks for the awesome show!
    Winke Responds:
    James, I don't worry about scent control much during the summer. The deer are used to it then and will accept some human activity because they have come to realize it is non-threatening. I also don't try to be quiet or hide my presence. I don't spend hardly any time in the timber, mostly on food plots so I am not hitting any sanctuary areas. When I start to run cameras for fall patterning (about mid-September) I then start to get much more serious about my scent. Good luck. (5-12-12)
  • Mike from MI asks:
    Really enjoyed your video on hunting ditches and swirling winds. I hunt a stand that sits at the bottom of a very steep ditch that comes off a corn field and leads down towards a river. I access from the river up to the base of the ditch where my stand is. Most activity is at the very top of the ditch where it evens out but unfortunately I am unable to hunt that land. The terrain is much flatter at the base where I hunt but still wondering if I've placed myself in a pocket of swirling wind and wanted your take. I rarley get busted but some of the local bruisers might be busting me silently. Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I would say the wind is swirling there. I would have to see it to know for sure, but it definitely sounds like a spot where swirling occurs. The top of the ditch is almost always the best for a number of reasons, but since you can't hunt there, you are stuck. I would carry some mikweed seeds and drop them occassionally to see where they blow. I bet you will be surprised. Good luck. (4-6-12)
  • Mike from IA asks:
    Last season I had trouble with wind swirling even when I was a good distance from the hill the wind was blowing over. Do you know how far approx. you have to be from a hill or ridge (30/40 ft high) the wind is blowing over, without causing all the swiring? Thank you for your time.
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I am not sure on that. I guess it will continue to swirl for at least 100 yards, maybe a bit less. That is just a guess on my part. I haven't actually tested that. Anytime you are downwind of something that blocks the wind (even a good ways downwind), you will have swirling and turbulence - especially when the wind gusts. Good luck. (4-3-12)
  • James from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, I have seen you say several times that it is very hard to keep garmets of clothing clean once you touch them. You're saying the scent free soap doesn't clean all that stuff out. I have a hard time believing you only because I hope its not true. If that were the case, then every article of clothing you buy has been handled in the factory, in the store and when you first buy it with out scent free gloves on. So the garmets are tainted right from the beginning. Is that why you say we can never be completely scent free? Not trying to be negative or arguementative, just hopin' there is a soap out there that will clean that stuff out of the clothes or it doesn't make a lot of sense to buy the expensive scent free clothing it its already not scent free before you even buy it...
    Winke Responds:
    James, I feel confident that I am right - at least some of the fouling odors can't be easily removed with washing. Probably some can, but certainly not all. If it is sometimes impossible to get a stain out of clothing, why would it seem so impossible that it is sometimes impossible to get an odor out? Both are organic compounds. I don't think most new garments get tons of handling before they arrive at the store - most are in plastic bags, but why would you ever buy a "scent free" garment that is hanging on a rack in the store for everyone to handle? I never would. Buy one that is still bagged. Garments with lots of pores and lots of surface area (like a fleece for example) are the worst. The odor molecules have so many places to attach and hide. There is a new washing machine add-on product on the market right now called Pure Wash that I am testing. It might make a difference. The P.R. person that sent it to me said that you don't need detergent and it works fine with cold water. It uses a process of oxidation and ozone to create a water chemistry that attacks organic compounds (odors) chemically rather than mechanically. I am not sure yet how well it works. I still need to do some more testing. It is a good concept though. Take one of your old polyester long undershirts. Smell the armpit. Does it smell? Wash it a few times and dry it and then smell it again. Still smell? I bet it does. Polyester also has a lot of pores where the odors can stick and hide. Not sure exactly how that relates to your buying practices, but yea, I think it is an issue. Good luck. (3-29-12)
  • Ken from WI asks:
    Hi Bill! I was just wondering what the current status is regarding the new Winke containment suit that you are working with at Cabelas? Thanks for expertise and helping fellow bowhunters! Ken
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, I just spoke with the head of their apparrel dept. yesterday and it will be in the fall catalog. I am not sure when those come out, probably late summer? Thanks and good luck. (3-29-12)
  • Chris from IL asks:
    Mr. Winke, I want to thank you for such an amazing show/website. I have been following you since Oct. of 2011 and I check it DAILY. Since keeping up to date with you and your crew I have decided to change the way I hunt. You have shed light and direction on things I have never thought about. My question for you is about scent control. My routine is when I get back from a hunting trip I wash my clothes in H.S. Scent wash, I then dry them in the dryer with H.S. Earth Scent dryer sheets and store them in air tight totes with H.S. Earth Scent wafers. Is this good, bad, or could it be better?
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, Awesome. Thanks so much for your support. I think in theory your system sounds good. I would do a test if possible sometime. Place an one of those wafers upwind of a trail near your stand and watch how the deer react to the odor when they pass through the scent stream. I am not sure about it since I have not tried that product in many years. If they ignore it you are golden. If they react to it with more than passing curiosity, you may want to leave out the cover scent. Also, once clothing is contaminated, it is very, very hard to ever wash it out. That is misconception people have. They think they can just wash the garment and they are good to go again. Not so. Over time, all clothing gets fouled too much that it can not be cleaned. The only option then might be ozone or something like that. Not sure as I have not tried that yet. Point is, normal washing won't keep your clothing from gaining odors that offend deer. I know it for a fact. Good luck. (3-29-12)
  • Randy from WI asks:
    Hi Bill, love your site and alway's enjoyed reading your articles. Here's my question. My brother and I hunt the same stand's and we alway's try to be scent conscious. He take's his coffee with him up in the stand. My thinking is if your goona go thru all the fuss of staying scent free, why bring coffe with you? What's your thinking on this subject. Thank's and keep up the good work! Randy
    Winke Responds:
    Randy, I think as long as he takes a coffee break and then puts it away, no big deal. I wouldn't leave the coffee cup sitting out for long though as that would certainly be a foreign odor. Not sure exactly how deer would react to coffee odor. Also, if they can smell the coffee, they are likely close enough to smell the hint of human odor you still have left on your person (it is really hard to get rid of 100% of your odor) so it may not be a big issue anyway. I would just say to have a nice coffee break and then put it away. Best regards (3-27-12)
  • Joey from FL asks:
    hi Bill, great show, hope you continue this show online for many years to come as i am a grad student and its great to have a first class show that I don't have to subscribe to a channel for... Scent control.. you mentioned that you use Sport Wash,i've used it, good stuff, but do you use just the regular ol white bottle with the orange on it that i can pick up at walmart, or do you use a special or more advanced formula? thanks, lets get andrew a turkey this year ! good luck and thanks for all your hard work! Joey
    Winke Responds:
    Joey, Thanks. We don't plan to go anywhere. I just use the regular Sport Wash that you can get anywhere. I hunted with the owner of that company many years ago and he went over the science on the product and it made a ton of sense. The kids will get after those old gobblers. Have a great day. (3-26-12)
  • ryan from MN asks:
    i recently have been looking into carbon products for scent control like carbon synergy. I looked up carbon and found "coal" in the definition which left me with a question. can i crush charcoal and use that. if they are not the same can you explain their differences. thank you love the show!
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, I think the manufacturers use a certain type of charcoal. Not sure what "activated" means, but maybe you can look up how to "activate charcoal" and see where that leads you. In theory, yes, you can but in practice it may not work well. Charcoal may also have additives to make it burn better or stick together so be sure you aren't actually adding additional odors that way. Worth more research I would say. Good luck. (3-15-12)
  • Brian from MI asks:
    Hi Bill, thanks for the great shows, I apologize if you addressed this question already and I missed your response but what are your thoughts on the HECS body suit?
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I have one here but I have not tried it yet. I guess it makes sense on some levels and I like the guys who are selling it; I just haven't tried it yet. Also, I don't think I have a lot of issues beating a deer's sixth sense, but maybe that is just because I don't realize that I do. It is a complex web. There are just so many variables in why deer become alert that it would be very, very hard to truly evaluate this suit in a purely unbiased way. At least it would be for the way I hunt. Definitely worth more exploration at some point. Best regards. (3-15-12)
  • Jake from WI asks:
    Bill, How much downwind clearance do you hope for with your setups? We'd all like to have a perfect funnel that has has a huge lake on each side so the wind could blow our scent out over the lake where deer can't travel but there are very few stand sites like that. I know it will vary with scenting conditions and level of scent control but I'm looking for a general rule of thumb. If I have a known travel route 200 yards downwind is that far enough? 500 yards? More? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks for a great show and website.
    Winke Responds:
    Jake, I think if you are doing all you can to decrease your scent then 200 to 300 yards is probably a good number. I think otherwise it is more than 400 yards. Possibly you can reduce it further, but no scent control is ever 100% so at best you are just trying to reduce the distance at which they can get enough of your odor to trigger. That also brings up another good point: each deer is different. I am not sure if they are different in their physiology, but some definitely are more sensitive to human odor than others. Those are just a few rule of thumb numbers you can consider. As you stated, local wind flow (such as updrafts and swirling, etc. will also affect this distance greatly. Good luck. (3-15-12)
  • joshua from OH asks:
    Just how important is using sent control? I've been using quite a lot of scent-away the past two years and have never had a deer up wind that didnt' smell me. Could you give me some tipes or reamend a better product?
    Winke Responds:
    Joshua, That product is only part of the solution. To answer your question, I think if you do things right, you can beat most of the deer most of the time, but not all of the deer all of the time. Doing things right includes keeping your clothing super clean. I use Sport Wash because it leaves less detergent residue and I hang my outerwear dry outside rather than putting them in the dryer. I also don't put the outerwear on until I get out of the truck and get ready to walk, same for my boots. Finally, spray down at this point. I don't carry a pack because that is just one more thing that can smell. I try to keep my gear to the absolute minimum because everything you add is one more thing that deer can smell. Of course, you need to keep your underwear layers clean too. There is a lot more to it than that. There is a lot of science and experience too, but to really get into this I would need to write a book. You can get away with a lot if you do it right. Again, I could spend a lot of time talking about what "right" is. You can get pretty creative on that. Good luck. (2-26-12)
  • Joe from MD asks:
    Many knee high rubber boots are now insulated with neoprene. They advertise being scent free; however, I know when you perspire neoprene smells incredibly bad. How can these boots still be considered scent free? What knee high rubber boots do you suggest that are quality scent free boots? Thank you for your suggestions in advance
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, The only ones that seemed to be really scent free to me were made of PVC. I suppose the real question is not whether they are scent free, but if if they are offensive to the deer. I am not sure on that. I always feel that if I can smell it, the deer can definitely smell it. I think if you leave the rubber boots out in the sun for a few days, the most volatile surface coatings will evaporate. I think that plus spraying them down with a good scent eliminator spray is the best hope for rubber boots. Good luck. (1-23-12)
  • Brian from ME asks:
    In your opinion what is the best strategy for scent elimination when walking to a stand location? Recently I had a giant 5x5 walking right for my stand and looked like a shot at less than 20 yards was inevitable, instead he hit my scent from walking in at 35 yards and bolted. I had not observed deer using the path he took, and thus determined my route to the stand accordingly. I usually spray my boots completely before traveling to the property and again after putting them on. The path I took was over a dormant alfalfa field so I'm thinking not much more the the sole of my boot made contact. Will you be attending the Big Buck Classic in Omaha at the end of this month.
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, The very best strategy I have found is to wear PVC waders. They aren't very warm so you end up having to swap out to other boots at the tree, but they definitely contain the scent. I think the scent falls off your clothing and also out of your boots (especially rubber) when you walk that is why they can smell you on the bare ground. Yours was kind of an extreme case though. That buck must have been hyper sensitive. The second best strategy is to wear a set of Elimitrax booties and leggings. They do a good job too of holding in scent. We will not be going to the Omaha show this year. Possibly next year. Good luck. (1-23-12)
  • Greg from WI asks:
    Bill: What steps did you take structurally (windows, door, seams, ect), to make your 2 story ground blind scent free? Does this allow you to hunt any wind with it? What do you believe is the best scent free/scent tight hunting blind on the market today? Thanks. Hope you knock down the Double G4 buck! Greg
    Winke Responds:
    Greg, It is nearly scent tight. When we close all the windows deer downwind may raise their noses but they don't usually spook and eventually they go back to eating. The blind is 6 X 6 feet and about 11 feet tall. There is corner cut out of the upstairs floor and a couple of steps to climb up there. The upstairs has four windows (one per side) that are roughly 3 feet wide and 9 inches tall. The windows are outlined in weather stripping and made of plexiglass with a lot of bent nails holding the glass against the stripping. The windows also have hinges and fold downward. The plexiglass is actually clear enough that we film right through it. All the footage from the blind was shot through the glass. That allows us to keep them closed for better scent retention. I suspect we will have to replace the upstairs plexiglass next year to make sure we have crystal-clear glass for filming. The downstairs has 10 windows (most are 15 inches tall by 8 inches wide). Again, all are covered with plexiglass. I keep them closed until the buck I am after shows up and then open just one to keep scent from blowing out. Overall, it works quite well. I have not tried many (just one) manufactured blinds so I don't have an opinion on which is best at containing odors. Thanks for the support. (1-4-12)
  • Joe from ME asks:
    Hey Bill, Love the web site. I check in every night for something new. Helps me unwind. Like you I'm skeptical when it comes to scent eliminating clothing. I've tried several but noticed that none of them can pass the gass pass test. Depending on what the wife prepared for dinner the previous night, I frequently have gass on stand and have no problem detecting it through the suit. If I can smell it I'm sure the deer can along with any other scent from my body. My question is: Can your suit pass the gas test?
    Winke Responds:
    Joe, Yes, it will. We actually snap ammonia capsules inside the membranes we intend to test and see how long it takes for the ammonia odor to get out. You would be surprised how powerful that is and how long you can lock that up inside even a breathable membrane if you select the right membrane. It comes down to pore size in the membrane. Like a screen - let the water vapor molecules out but hold the scent molecules inside. The biggest risk is not what is inside the suit - I am not worried about that, but how you handle it. Once contaminated it is very hard to ever get it truly clean again. Even when you wash them regularly, over time the deer actually start smelling the garment itself. There are many tradeoffs in this that I am not going to bore you with, but the bottom line is that you need to be very, very careful with the suit itself. It will contain odors but if the suit stinks even a bit it isn't going to be as effective. There is no question it works. Good luck. Merry Christmas. (12-23-11)
  • David from MI asks:
    Howdy, I am an avid bowhunter from the state of michigan. I was fortunate enough to take 2 bucks this past year which is perfectly legal here. Both bucks came in down wind from my stands from several hundred yards out and I was able to kill an 8 point at 37 yards, and a 10 point at 20 yards. I practice rigid scent control by using every scent controlling product imaginable. I also use brand named carbon lined clothing as a base layer and an external layer. I was just wondering if I got lucky or if I do not put enough human scent in the air to bother the deer completely. I have not been winded in 3 years by using rigid scent control. What are your thoughts on this? p.s. I love the website!
    Winke Responds:
    David, It is hard to say for sure. I have seen luck come into play on thermals and local winds, etc. that makes it tough to tell when deer should be smelling you and when they shouldn't. The only real test I have found is to drop wind floaters and watch them blow right to the deer. When that happens, you are pretty sure they should be able to smell you. There is no doubt that what you are doing is helping and is worth continuing. Even if all you do is reduce the distance over which a deer can smell you, that is a big deal and will keep your hunting area fresh longer. Because you are not being winded (assuming you are out a lot) you must be doing something right. I don't get winded very often either, but that is as much a result of bulletproof stand sites where the deer can't get downwind of me as anything else. What you are doing seems to be working. (12-12-11)
  • Jordan from MO asks:
    Hi Bill, Congrats on the G5 buck. This isn't a question, but an interesting scent control strategy I learned from a couple older bowhunters this past week I'd like to pass along. If you happen to walk past fresh deer droppings in the woods, always carry a zip lock baggy to collect as much as you can. Back before commercial scent control products really hit the market, these hunters would light the deer droppings on fire before a hunt. While the smoke would arise into the air, they would stand just over the lit droppings to let the smell mask their human odor on their coveralls. It sounds pretty radical, but they swore by it.
    Winke Responds:
    Jordan, Not sure I want to stand over burning dung, but I have heard of guys using wood smoke to conceal their odors too. They too swear by it, but I have never tried it. I don't believe deer are afraid of smoke odors, but I would need some experience to be sure that they can't separate human odors from the smoke odors. They are amazingly good at separating odors. Good tip though. Best to you. (11-25-11)
  • Matt from WI asks:
    Bill, Love the show and your website! I have a couple of questions about scent control. Do you think deer can smell air-activated hand warmers? If so, does it alert them? What about food? Will eating a sandwich and a candy bar in my treestand contaminate the area I am hunting as far as scent is concerned? I do as much as I can to eliminated human odor when hunting, but am I going to alert deer if I use handwarmers and eat lunch in the woods?
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I am guessing they can smell it because I can smell it. I don't use them, for no particular reason, I just don't. The real question is whether it is offensive or just another organic odor that hits them all the time. I am not sure on that. It is hard to know without hanging one in a tree upwind of a trail and watching how they react and I have never done that. I think the sandwich and candy bar are fine. They are gone fast anyway (at least in my hands they are). My gut tells me you are fine on the handwarmer but I can't say for sure on that. I guess if you keep it inside something that will help too. Good luck. (11-22-11)
  • Matt from MO asks:
    In a past question you said that waiders helped cover your ground scent. Would knee high rubber boots have the same effect?
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, In a limited sense they would, but the vast majority of ground scent isnt actually on the ground but on vegetation. If low brush touches your clothing, you will leave scent. Rubber boots are fine if there is no chance of touching brush, otherwise you need something taller. Wadwrs may be overkill in some situations but they will definitely hold in scent. Good luck. (11-7-11)
  • corey from IA asks:
    I know we are always trying to stay up wind from deer,but help me with this scenario. If your treestand is on a hillside ,how far will your scent carry before a deer can no longer detect it ? thanks love the show
    Winke Responds:
    Corey, First, it probably has to be on the top of the ridge to really carry very far. If it is down over the side, the winds will be sucked down as they swirl into the protected air lower in the valley. The only place where they will stay aloft is way up on top (right on the top edge of the slope). In that case, I think a deer has be at least 200 yards away not to smell your scent if you take maximum scent elimination steps but more like at least 500 yards if you take no steps. So, while scent elimination is not 100% effective (in most cases) it does make your hunting area hunt larger by reducing your impact. Good luck. (11-14-11)
  • Ken from AL asks:
    Hi Bill! Love your show and that you are a true bow hunter; not promoting products that you don't believe in! I have hunted with a bow for over forty years and still seem to learn something new every year. However, I continue to have a problem with getting busted by big bucks every year; this year alone on three big bucks. I use scent lok suits, head mask, scent liner boots and socks and gloves. Use scent killer spray, watch for wind direction, store all my clothing in a scent lok bag, change clothing in the field! Wear elimatrax into and back from my stands. Use true carbon for my exposed face; Use Hunters specialties fresh earth cover scent wafer. Yet, when I read about how other hunters have big bucks come from down wind and don't get busted, I wonder why I'm having trouble? any ideas? Thanks, Ken
    Winke Responds:
    Ken, Two things: don't believe everything you hear or read. There are many variables such as cover and terrain that shape the winds, and thermals. What may seem like downwind, isn't always downwind. What you are doing is all good. It is very, very tough to fool most of the deer most of the time and I think it is impossible to fool all of the deer all of the time. I am working on another version of the "Winke" suit with Cabela's that will come out next fall. I have been testing one this season. I really like that concept of scent containment more than scent absorption. I am not blowing smoke, it has worked better for me. You may want to take a look at that next fall when it comes out. I am sure I will talking about it a lot more before then. Good luck. (11-3-11)
  • Casey from IL asks:
    Hi Bill, I was curious what area or areas of the body you try and protect from emitting scent more so than others? Is there any other special prep to cut down on scent being produced besides showering and spraying down for these areas?
    Winke Responds:
    Casey, I use a good unscented deodorant and keep my hair pretty short, but otherwise, just showering and spraying down each time you go out. Keeping your outerwear clean is a big deal. Much bigger than most people realize. It goes way beyond just washing and hanging outside to dry. Actually, I don't even handle my outerwear with me hands, just use a clean pair of jersey gloves everytime. I keep the carefully stored away from odors between hunts and hang them whenever possible. Most people don't realize that once your outerwear is contaminated, it is very hard to get it cleaned up enough again that deer won't smell it. Good luck (11-13-11)
  • Derek from MO asks:
    Bill, I am a huge fan of Midwest Whitetail and have watched it every week since it started only a few years ago. I play baseball at Southeast Missouri State and love watching your show every week. I wanted to share something with you about how I deal with scent control. A week or so before the opening day, and throughout the season, I put my hunting clothing in a large trash bag full of leaves. Helps blend you in more with the woods. This has been extremely effective and wanted to see what you thought?
    Winke Responds:
    Derek, I do that too. I think it works great. Key is to make sure they are dry leaves so you don't get mildew in the bag, or else you can replace them often. I appreciate the support and your advice for other hunters. Good luck this season. (11-6-11)
  • Troy from MI asks:
    What is your opinion on the effectiveness of the new ozone emitting scent elimination units? Particularly in a blind application with limited and more controlled air flow. If I remember correctly you have an engineering back ground and had a scent elimination suit out at one time? So you are obviously thinking about this kind of thing. I'm an engineer who wants to believe it will help any unplanned wind direction... Love your show and articles.
    Winke Responds:
    Troy, I think the technology makes sense, I am just not sure it works fully in the application they advertise (where the machine is above you in a tree). I would have to see that to believe it. It might work fine, but it seems there are many variables in that scenario. However, in a blind it would seem to make a ton of sense. I also think those machines would be great for getting odors out of your hunting clothes. We are going to bring the suit back out again in 2012. Good luck. (10-26-11)
  • Chris from MO asks:
    Are the blueballs on evergreen trees a good scent cover? Just wondering if you've ever heard of people crushing them up and making a spray for a natural scent cover.
    Winke Responds:
    Chris, Those are cedar balls (seeds). Yes, I suppose they would be. I have used the cedar boughs themselves in my clothing bag to add cover scent. Good luck. (10-26-11)
  • Mike from IL asks:
    Bill I know that you are sponsored by execute scent control but I was hoping for your honest opinion on the ozonics machine. As a working class man with 3 kids I hate to throw away my hard earned money on just another gimmick. Thanks for your time and good luck this season.
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I believe the technology is solid but not sure it will work in that application - where it is in the tree with you. However, I do think that in a ground blind it will likely do a great job. Also, I think it would be a great way to remove odors from clothing if used in a closet with your hunting clothes, for example. Not sure if it will actually work in the tree, though. I just don't know enough about that application. Seems to me that human scent woudl blow right past the ozone molecules. Seems like a reach that the ozone would get them all, but I could be wrong. Good luck.
  • Hunter from OK asks:
    Bill, thanks again for all that you do for our hunting lifestyle. Reading your articles has put me seasons ahead of where I would have been without your help. I don't see you supporting "gimmicks" and nor do I put a lot of grain in them...however, I am curious as to your thoughts on the "latest and greatest" Ozonics scent elemination technology. Jay Gregory is a big supporter of this device, and although I'm sure he is motivated financially, I do respect him as a whitetail hunter. Do you have any personal experience with the Ozonics and or are you aware of the legitimacy of this technology? Surely, if this was as good as they say, everyone would have one and it would make hunting mature deer a lot easier. I hope Jay isn't pulling a fast one on us! Thanks again, and best of luck this season. -Hunter
    Winke Responds:
    Hunter, The science will work, I am just not sold on the application. I am not convinced that simply setting it up above your stand location will eliminate all your scent when the breeze blows. I can see how it would definitely work (at least to some extent) in a blind. The odors are contained better in that location. Again, the technology is solid, just not sure it will work as they say in the places they say it will work. But that is just me using my judgement. I have not tried it. Someday I might. I am not sure it is legal here in Iowa. There have been some questions raised about that. I would have to look into it carefully. Good luck.
  • Jeff from IN asks:
    Bill-I've been following your web show since just after you started it and I'm always learning something new. Thanks! My question is about scent control. You talk about what you do before the hunt, but what do you do after the hunt? I know you use a fresh set of gloves every hunt to handle your your outer layers. How do you handle those layers after the hunt? Do you spray them again before you bag them? And do you always bag your outer clothes separate from everything else? I always feel like I'm getting my scent all over my clothes when I store them and never sure I've done all I can to keep them scent free. Thanks again for the help!
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I am a big believer in keeping them away from odors but keeping them loose so they can air out. The ideal would be to place them in a tub full of leaves or cedar boughs with the lid off and leave them in the back of your truck with a topper to cover them from rain and theft. That way they aren't forced to soak up any odors they have. Airing them out is a big deal I think. We hang the suits outside as often as possible between hunts. I always keep the outerwear separate. I am wearing a garment that is actually a containment vessel, so to speak. I have done tons of testing on this (more than most people would believe) and I know what works. There are two keys: keep your scent in and keep the garment from getting contaminated. If you can do both, the deer have a hard time smelling you. Think that way and you will know exactly what to do with your outerwear.
  • Jonathan from MO asks:
    Mr. Winke, I have followed your shows for a couple of seasons now and I love them, thank you for sharing all of your knowledge with us. I was hoping that you could spend a little bit of time letting us know how you manage your sent other than hunting the wind. Do you use any scent killer products, either close or sprays? If yes what is your method, if no, why? I think this could be a great segment to show. THANKS again, can't wait to watch tomorrow!!!
    Winke Responds:
    Jonathan, We are using Xecute this year for scent reduction. I am a big fan of keeping the outerwear squeaky clean. That is really important. I wash in Sport Wash and hang to dry. No dryer. Good luck.
  • art brennhofer from MN asks:
    Hi Bill,first I would like to thank you for all the information that you provide to help us hunters understand deer better.I read an article in a magazine that talked about using some kind of a "smoker" to give your hunting clothes a smoke oder.I am not sure who markets it but the author claimed that he sees alot more mature deer now because deer are not afaid of a smoke smell and it covers up his human smell.My hunting partner smokes cigaettes and I can smell them on him but he sees more deer then I do.Is it possible that could work.Thanks again,Art
    Winke Responds:
    Art, I don't necessarily think the cigarettes will cover up human odor, that is coincidence, but there is some evidence that smoking your clothing over some kind of fire (wood chips) will help to cover odors in the clothing and possibly even your body odors. I have seen one clothing smoker, but I have never used one. I am not sure if it will work, but it does have some potential. Good luck.
  • Jacob from LA asks:
    First off, I really enjoy your show, the website and your approach to deer management / hunting. I usually keep my scent free clothing in big contractor trash bags. I'm not sure if these transmit odors to my clothes, and I was thinking about getting a couple of the H.S. scent safe bags this year instead of the trash bags. How do you store your scent free clothing, and can you walk me through the sequence you use from the time you decide to wash hunting clothes until its time to wash again? Thanks -Jacob
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, The HS bags will work. I have used them. If you can smell the bag the deer can smell the bag on your clothing. I wash and then hang out my outerwear. I never dry my outerwear. I do dry my inner layers. I have dozens of pairs of jersey gloves that I wash too and only handle my outerwear when wearing fresh gloves. I put the inner garments into a Ziploc scentproof bag, I think from Scent Blocker. I put the outerwear into a big canoer's dry bag that I got from Cabela's a number of years ago. It has no odor. It is a PVC bag that I selected in the store because it had no odor inside when I opened it. I still fill it with leaves every year and pile my outerwear in there with the leaves. Spray outerwear with scent eliminator. We use Xecute. I keep my boots in a place in my truck bed where there is no chance of contamination. I don't want to seal them because the foot odor potentially then gets trapped with the entire boot. Let is air out. I never wear the boots or outerwear except when walking to and from the stand and while hunting. I always take it off when I get back to the truck. I get about five or six days out of my outerwear in this way and change my longies every day. Middle layers, every couple of days. That may not be perfect, but it is what I do. Good luck.
  • dippy from AL asks:
    can i chew and spit tobacoo during bow hunting or will the deer smell it and leave the area
    Winke Responds:
    Dippy, From everything I have seen and heard from chewers, it is not a big deal to the deer. You should be able to get away with it. They are much more likely to leave the area due to your ground scent where you walked in and out than from your tobacco on the ground. Good luck.
  • Cory from IA asks:
    Hi Bill, enjoy the show every season. My question is about carbon hunting clothes. You are supposed to put them in the dryer to reactivate the carbon, but there is speculation that a dryer would never get hot enough to reactivate the carbon. So, are carbon hunting clothes a waste of money? I have had a carbon suit for years, and am careful about my scent,but have still got busted downwind. What are your thoughts on this subject, or have you heard these rumors?
    Winke Responds:
    Cory, I stopped wearing carbon clothing back in the late 90s, if that is any indication of my feelings. I am not sure if they work or don't work for others. Some claim they do. I got busted all the time too. In fact, I couldn't tell the difference between my abilty to elude deer with the carbon clothes versus just wearing poly/cotton. Maybe I wasn't diligent enough in my handling of the clothes or maybe the technology has gotten better since the late 90s. That is my simple honest answer.
  • Kyle from MI asks:
    Vehicle scent control - What do you recommend for car/truck interiors to help with scent for those driving to their hunting locations? I just got a vanilla air refreshener from Browning - but I think it would be a negative for hunting - although my car smells great! Thanks for putting the videos on the website (main show and all states)!
    Winke Responds:
    Kyle, It is going to be really hard. Short of seat liners (something that holds the scent back like a vinyl) there is not much you can do. The best bet is to never wear your outer clothing in the vehicle. I keep mine in a scentproof bag in the back of the truck (along with my boots in a separate container). Wear clean sweat pants and sweatshirt in the vehicle and take it off when you get parked. Don't put the outerwear on until you get to your hunting spot and start walking. Good luck.
  • Tom from OH asks:
    Hey Bill,I had a one piece,waterproof,camo coverall with your name on it that I purchased from Cabela's a few years back.Long to short,it was cut off of me in the E.R. I CAN'T FIND another one.It was the most versatile clothing I had ever worn.Where can I find it,or a reasonable replacement that work's as well? Thanks,Tom A.
    Winke Responds:
    Tom, I hope you are OK! They stopped making the suit back in 2005. I was able to get a few (most I gave away, unfortunately). However, we are going to offer that garment again in the spring so keep your eyes open in the Archery 2012 catalog. Thanks for your support.
  • Drew from MO asks:
    hi i was wondering how you help prevent sent when hanging your stands? i understand boots and cover and all that but how do you help against sweat and keeping that off the tree?
    Winke Responds:
    Drew, You could bring a change of undergarments in a big ziploc. That would work. I don't change clothes or anything like that. It is hard to keep from sweating so you may have a scent issue when setting up stands. I use a suit that I worked on with Cabela's back in 2004 that contains odors very well and that pretty much handles the bulk of the problem when I zip it up. We are going to come out with the suit again next spring, so that will be nice to be able to promote that. I still wear mine seven years later. It is getting ragged and I need a new one! Good luck.
  • Travis from MO asks:
    Bill, I am considering making my own scent eliminator this year, using a recipe off the internet. Do you believe commercial brands are worth spending a few extra bucks or that homemade scent eliminators are just as efficient?
    Winke Responds:
    Travis, I don't know. Some of the formulas are pretty simple with must baking soda suspended in water. I don't think they are as effective as chemicals designed to attack the molecular chain of carbon (the basic building block of all odors). It is sure worth a try. On the other hand, what is a couple of bucks when you are talking about all the time and money we already have invested in this sport. I used to make my own seed blends, but eventually I realized I wasn't saving much money and potentially not planting the best varieties for winter hardiness, etc. I would rather spend the extra couple of dollars and know some chemist is doing the research to hopefully make the formula better.
  • Pat from TX asks:
    Hey Bill. I know we all try to be conscious of scent control, but people tell me I am obsessed. The last time my wife bought wash cloths and towels I took the old ones and made them my dedicated hunting towels and wash cloths that get washed and dryed with the same scent free detergents and dryer sheets I use with my hunting clothes. I also use a small ozone creating device (about the size of a cell phone) that I leave in a scent free tote overnight with my hunting clothes. Then if I have a chance, I will hang my clothes on a clothes line for a while before hunting. Finally I spray down before getting in the stand. I don't know if it's all or just one single thing that's working, but I have had or killed several deer downwind of me using this technique including a 140+ class buck downwing at about ten steps last year. Am I going overboard? By the way, I tried to talk my wife into letting me by a good used washer/dryer set to put in our shop dedicated solely to washing hunting gear but
    Winke Responds:
    Pat, I don't think you are going too far on that. There is no such thing as too scent-free. I would say that a dedicated used washer and dryer would be something to save for. That is what I do. They are very cheap - often free. The ones I use are junk, but they get the job done. There is no question that the dryer (and washer for that matter) will carry odors from one load to the next and if the previous load was with scented degergents and fabric softeners, you will have that odor on your hunting clothes too. Maybe you can talk your wife into using only unscented detergents and fabric softeners for all your laundry. Good luck with that. I agree with all your steps. Good work.
  • Brandon from WI asks:
    I see that you've teamed up with Cabela's once again. Any chance they'll be coming out with another set of Bill Winke signiture clothing soon? I believe you mentioned that suit a few times and how it's been a great suit for you and you couldn't find it in stores anymore... Congratulations on all the new angles MW is going and I wish you the best of luck. Thanks, Brandon
    Winke Responds:
    Brandon, Yes, it will be out in the spring. That was the motivation behind this new relationship. Of course, I want to have a good retailer for a sponsor of the shows, but we are going to combine that sponsorhsip with the Winke Suit Rev2 starting soon. Thanks for asking.
  • Pat from MO asks:
    How do you stay scent free when putting up your stands?
    Winke Responds:
    Pat, I don't. That is the simple answer. Putting up stands means you sweat - at least I do. However, I wear a suit that contains odors so it is not so likely that deer can smell the B0 that eventually results from bacteria breaking down sweat because it is bottled up. I will be offering this suit through Cabela's starting in early 2012. That was what prompted the Cabela's sponsorship this year. Good luck.
  • Drew from AL asks:
    i just bought some new rubber boots. what do you do to get rid of the new rubber smell?
    Winke Responds:
    Drew, I would scrub them thoroughly with unscented soap using a stiff bristle brush and then leave them out in the sun for a few days to evaporate any oils that might be on the surface. I doubt you will ever get them 100% scent free. That is another of big misconceptions - that rubber boots are scentless. They may contain scents if you keep the top tight, but they aren't scentless themselves. However, after a few trips through the woods some of the odor fades. Be sure to store them separate from your clothing and keep them away from other odors. Literally, only wear them when in the field, not in the vehicle. That will help to keep them clean. I haven't worn rubber boots in recent years, but I suspect I will wear them again someday. I am not sold on the fact that they are required for scentfree entry and exit. A good clean, Cordura boot also works very well. Good luck.
  • Cody from WI asks:
    Hey Bill! I was recently looking at a pair of rubber boots to buy for hunting, and after reading most of the reviews on Cabelas, almost every review said they have a rubber smell that they can smell with there own nose, would they be worth purchasing? And would the deer be able to smell the rubber? If not, what would you suggest for a Rubber Boot, in the price range of 60-80? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, I think I answered this one earlier. Please look down the list on the Recent questions to see if in fact I did. Thanks and have a great day.
  • Chuck from WI asks:
    Bill, Thank you for doing such a great job with your show. I would like to know your opinion on Ozone and its ability to neutralize human odor.
    Winke Responds:
    Chuck, I have not tried them, but the science is sound. I am just not sure the application is perfect. It is kind of like activated charcoal, it will filter odors, but maybe not as effectively as everyone would like. Ozone is an unstable oxygen molecule. Stable oxygen it O2, ozone is O3, I think. Some heavy oxygen generators are producing molecules with as much as 5 or 6 loosely bound atoms of oxygen. All those extra oxygen atoms have to go somewhere. When these heavy molecules are released they naturally attack carbon based molecules (most organic molecules like gasoline, human scent, cigarette smoke) are carbon-based. The stray oxygen molecules grab those carbon molecules to become either carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide (I am not sure which). The bottom line - it rips those carbon chains apart and the odor molecule is destroyed. Used car reconditioners have used ozone for years to remove cigrarette smoke. There is no doubt it works, but I am not sure that outside of a confined space it is as effective as people hope. I can see the best application as using the heavy oxygen to remove odors from clothing in some kind of closet setting, or possibly used within a ground blind to wipe out airborne odors. However, unconfined, out in the open, I remain skeptical that it can truly eliminate all or most human odor. Again, I haven't tried it in an unconfined area, so I may be wrong, just be sure to go in with your eyes open and realize that wide open settings may be where the product falls short. Good luck.
  • Cody from WI asks:
    Bill, relating back to the other question i had, you explained that you don't want to lrave any of your sent around the area of the scrape, i do you have hunting boot's(scentlok) and i do also use cover scent's(scent eliminating spray), but what about glove's? What do i get to prevent the smell of my hands around tye area? Thanks! Bill!
    Winke Responds:
    Cody, The gloves that people use for washing dishes (you can get them at the grocery store) or even latex safety gloves should contain and control your scent. I have used both in the past with good success. Good luck.
  • Floyd Greer from MO asks:
    As far as scent control; I wear rubber boots. I was looking at some with neoprene. What is your opinion of neoprene on rubber boots as far as scent control?
    Winke Responds:
    Floyd, Both neoprene and rubber have some odor of their own - neoprene is worse. I let any new boots sit in the sun for several days to evaporate as much of the odor molecules as possible, but I think they still have an odor. The only boots I have used that didn't have any odor were made of plastic or PVC. We have used PVC boots in the past and they are fine, but normally very cheap and uncomfortable. They are not made for hunting, but for industrial use. Rubber is the better choice, but I have also done fine with Scentproof Cordura Nylon boots as long as kept them away from any sources of odor. That is what I am using now.
  • Jared from WI asks:
    Earth scent wafers, I am currently using the wafers as my cover scent but I am worried that I may dedected by game. I keep all of my clothing in a air tight scent bag. When I take them out of the bag it seems to be a strong earth oder. What is a great cover scent for Whitetail hunts? Thanks Jared from Wisconsin.
    Winke Responds:
    Jared, I am not sure if those will work or not. I have not worked with them extensively. It is hard to beat naturally occuring items. For example, actual dry dirt, dry leaves, cedar boughs if you have cedar. I often fill my scent bag half full of dry leaves in October. I am not sure how effective the cover scents really are. The key is to keep your clothing very, very clean and not even handle them with your bare hands. I always use a clean (fresh washed) pair of cheap jersey gloves every time I go out to hunt. I hope that helps. Have a great Easter.
  • john from AR asks:
    hello bill what is your take on activated carbon hunting cloths? do you use them or is spray on scent control enough. thanks john
    Winke Responds:
    John, I think when used correctly they can help. They are no silver bullet however. Carbon in clothing will not keep deer from smelling you. I have worn it enough to know that. Though I don't wear the carbon at this time, I have worn it extensively in the past. Deer smelled me. It is very, very hard to remove all foreign odor from your body and clothing. It can be done, but it requires going to extremes. Just buying a suit of carbon won't do it. I use the sprays and still wear a garment I worked on with Cabela's back in 2004. They discontinued it in 2007. It was not 100% either, but very good. We are looking at bringing it back out.
  • Matt from OH asks:
    I have a question Bill i have heard the deer don't smell ur spit if u dip tabacoo i just wanted to know if there any research done about that if they smell and can tell its human sent im sure a lot of guys wonder the same thing i am.
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I am not aware of any formal testing. I know enough guys that have spit in front of deer and not had them freak out though. My guess is that each deer is a bit different in their reaction, but overall I am guessing here (since I don't chew) that they don't see tobacco spit as human scent.
  • Charlie from IA asks:
    I was just curious if you had any knowledge or first hand experience with the ozonic scent eliminators. I've been doing some reading online and they sure sound like they could make our lives a lot easier sitting in the stand. What are your thoughts?
    Winke Responds:
    Charlie, I have not tried them. I understand the technology, I am just not well enough versed in the product itself to know if that technology actually works to remove scent molecules from the air. It likely does work under the right conditions - in a blind for example. I doubt it works under all conditions, however. I don't like carrying stuff. I'm funny that way. I like hunting deer a certain way and don't want to do it other ways. I enjoy hunting them on their own terms most of the time. Each person has his or her own measure of satisfaction. Mine is not always just in the form of shooting a big buck, but often I gain as much (or more) satisfaction from how I do it. For that reason, I am not an early adopter of most technologies. I may be carrying one some day, but not right now. Good luck.
  • LANCE from TX asks:
    I always enjoy reading your question and answers. It is a great way to learn about the art of bowhunting. My question relates to information that I have read that states that 60% of a hunter's odor comes from their head and mouth. I have tried one of the hunter's toothpaste that is on the market and to me the mint breath was just as bad as using a national brand toothpaste which would alert deer. So, is there an effective face mask that a hunter could use in warm and cold weather that would reduce your head and breath odor? Again, thanks for all of your hard work and dedication to the art of bowhunting. Lance.
    Winke Responds:
    Lance, I was never in that camp. Who says that your breath has human odor in it? Maybe deer come to associate your breath odor with humans, but my guess is that they don't. I have spit on the ground in front of deer and they just sniff it and walk off. I would say that breathing through your nose most of the time when you have deer downwind is as good as anything. Also, carrying a few apples to the stand will help to keep your breath fresh. Someday someone will do an actual test to determine if deer relate breath odor to humans. Again, I would be surprised. I know for a fact they don't associate human urine with human odor. Again, someday we will know for sure. Good luck.
  • kevin from IA asks:
    Dear bill long time viewer first time writer. My question is my base layer of scent free clothing should it be loose fitting or tight fitting.Before cranking out a bunch of money.
    Winke Responds:
    Kevin, I think it should be comfortably snug. I don't like "tight" but I think it will work better if it makes contact with your body. The second layer is the one that should be fairly loose. The job of the first layer is to get the moisture off your body and away from you as quickly as possible. It will do that better if it makes contact with your body all the way around. But not tight. I hope that helps.
  • Chuck from MO asks:
    Do you believe the Scentblocker and Scent Lok suites are effective today? Is it worth the money to spend $500 for the pro series edition? Thanks for your time!
    Winke Responds:
    Chuck, It is hard to tell someone that a product works or doesn't work because the level of expectation is different from one person to another. I want my scent control gear to work nearly 100%. If it is 50% I can get that from a clean polycotton suit. Does the carbon stuff work? I am sure it works, but to what degree? That is where the testing comes in and I haven't been in that game for a while. So, I don't know for sure. I used to wear various models of carbon clothing back in the 90s and early 2000s and they didn't do what I thought they should do so I stopped wearing them. They probably did something, just not what I wanted. I am sure the technology of those products has improved over the years since. But, I started trying other solutions, and I ended up with someting of my own. I produced a suit with Cabela's back in 2004 that I still wear. Management changed there, the new guy didn't like me or the suit or something and closed them out back in 2006. We are talking about trying to resurrect that product, but I am not sure how that will all play out. If it happens, it will happen soon. If not, I will likely be trying some new garments and will test the new stuff from Scent-Lok and Scent Blocker to see if it is better than it was back around 2000.
  • Chuck from MO asks:
    Bill, after recently reading your book I have a whole new approach on hunting mature deer. What advise do you have to help further eliminate ground scent when walking in? I am looking for a new edge to take with me in 2011, all the scent control measures I take every time out just are not enough. I have several hundred acres and multiple stands to hunt on different farms and deer seem to still figure me out with limited pressure and paying attention to every detail. Thanks for your time!
    Winke Responds:
    Chuck, I have had good luck with both waders (PVC waders like Three Forks from Cabela's) and Elimitrax booties when walking to and from stands. Both will contain your scent without depositing its own scent on the ground, grass and low brush. Another option is to cut trails that you walk on that have elminated any chance of brushing up against vegetation. That is where most ground scent is deposited. Not so much on the ground itself, but on low vegeatation that your pants touch. Good luck.
  • Carl from TX asks:
    Mr.Winke I've always tried to be as scent free as possible. My body to my equipment. I was wondering what's your method of scent control. Do you do it all or just hunt the wind? Thanks all.
    Winke Responds:
    Carl, I do it all and then I also hunt the wind. I want every possible advantage. I wear a suit I designed for Cabela's back in 2004. It never sold well then and they eventually closed themout, but I kept a small number of them. That is what the cameraman and myself wear on every hunt. We shower first, put on a fresh clean pair of gloves each time out and keep the outerwear in a sealed canoe bag that we pull out only after we get to the spot where we plan to start walking. I keep my boots in the back of the truck away from any odors and sometimes keep them in a tub. Again, we only pull them out when it is time to get ready to walk in. After a few days, the system works fast and we are on our way within a few minutes. It does add some time and trouble, but it is definitely worth it. I don't carry a backpack. I only carry what I can fit in my pockets. I spray the bow, quiver and arrows down with a scent eliminator regularly. The less you take with you, the less you have that will smell. Make sure to wash your harness and keep it with your outerwear. Good luck.
  • Jason from KS asks:
    Do you think deer can smell a difference between clothes made from natural fibers (such as cotton or wool) and synthetics such as polyester? I know that synthetics are made with a lot of chemicals that could possibly add to scent detection. I have been reading about petrochemicals and am looking to eliminate as many as possible. On the flip side; I have had great luck with Elimitrax and it isn’t natural… Any opinion as to which type of clothing holds/repels scent better?
    Winke Responds:
    Jason, I think the bigger issue is the processes and dyes used in the production of the fabric. There is likely way more odor with the dyes than there would ever be with the fabric itself. I have done well with polyester fabrics in the past, but only when they are new. Once a garment gets contaminated, it is really hard to fully wash the "stink" out of it. That is why I always handle my outerwear with caution (only using clean gloves). If you can air them out good for a few days outside in the hot sun much of the unnatural odor will evaporate and "bake" out of it, but you are definitely on to something here. Garments are not all scent free right from the manufacturer. With a couple of washings and plenty of "airing" out, however, most will be much better. There is a lot more to this than what I am telling. I spent two years studying it, (I mean really studying it) but there is not room for all that here. I will likely write an article about it at some point and post it to the articles section. Good luck.
  • Dave from WI asks:
    Awesome website and tons of great info. Your one of a few " pros" whose judgement and observations I trust. Bill when you did your scent control with the waders and PVC jacket what did you do with your breath? And how important is it to control breath/mouth vapor? Thanks, Dave
    Winke Responds:
    Dave, I have never felt that human breath has human odor in it. I have experimented many times by spitting on the ground with deer close by and they will sniff it but show no signs of fear. My guess is that human breath odor is overstated as a factor in scent control. If you are in doubt, you can always make a point to breath through your nose when deer are downwind. I seriously doubt you will see a difference. Good luck.
  • Ryan from WI asks:
    Hey Bill i was just wondering what scent elimination steps you take before going into the woods and what products you use? Do you wash your clothes in Scent-Away? Take a Scent-Away shower? Spray all clothes?
    Winke Responds:
    Ryan, I always shower and keep my outer clothing very clean and in a separate scent proof bag. I only take them out when I get to where I am hunting then only handle them with clean gloves on. I wash my outerwear in Sport Wash. I feel like that does a good job on low nap polyester clothing. I use other name brands on my under garments. I have not been using sprays on my outerwear but do use them on my hat and the things I carry such as my bow, bino straps, etc.
  • Kevin from IL asks:
    What do you do when you get a running nose.If you wipe it on your gloves i'm sure there has to be some kind of scent there.
    Winke Responds:
    Kevin, I don't think that deer smell human scent in mucus. I know they don't smell human scent in urine, nor in spit (I have tested that several times). So I would say you are free to wipe that runny nose all you want. Good luck.
  • Scottq from WI asks:
    Hey Bill, I bought one of your Winke Scent Elimination suits from Cabelas a couple of years ago. Despite the fact that it is almost unbearable in warm weather, I do think it's above anything I've ever tried for scent elimination in the field once the weather cools. That's just based on my own experience from having deer downwind. Was just wondering if you still use one of these and if you still believe in the product? It isn't available anywhere these days, but I have to say I'm happy I was able to get one before they were gone. Of course my reason for asking is to justify NOT purchasing new hunting gear!
    Winke Responds:
    Scott, I still use one and insist that my cameraman wears one two. However, mine are starting to get worn and tattered. I will eventually have another version if only to make sure I have them for my own hunting. There is no reason to buy anything new. Good luck.
  • Joseph Harris from TN asks:
    How important is it to use a scent control clothing? I find it rather expensive and was wondering if it really works or not and if so what brand do you recommend. I am on a limited budget and if it is not worth it I would rather spend my money else where. I hear the carbon breaks down and has a shelf life. What do you suggest?
    Winke Responds:
    Joseph, I don't know about the shelf life. I think the products do some good. I tried everything out there all through the 90s and found that nothing really decreased my scent much. Since then the technology may have gotten better but I started to use a product I developed with Cabela's that they took off the market in 2006. Since then I have been using that product. If money is tight, I would not buy the scent clothing and focus on only hunting stands where there is little chance for a deer to get downwind of you. Good luck.
  • Dalton from KS asks:
    My neighbor says that a deer can't smell you if you are 15 feet in a stand or higher. I don't know because I saw does bust you when you are 30 feet. He told me that Kansas doesn't have swirling winds and that our scent rises so we can hunt without the deer busting us. Is this true? I know you always are very careful about your scent control and you won't let your scent be blown into any bedding areas. I always wash my clothes before going and and i take a shower in scent free soap. Then I spray myself down with scent killer and after that i use a wafer that smells like freshly plowed earth. Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Dalton, Your neighbor is wrong. With a gusty wind the scent will hit the ground after only a few yards from a stand that low. He is wrong on the swirling winds too. Anytime there are variations in the terrain, even in the cover, the wind will swirl when it gusts. Good luck.
  • corey from WI asks:
    how often do you washyour clothes if you are hunting 4 or 5 times a week and do you use scented dryer sheets or do you air dry (i find it hard to air dry when you plan on hunting in the morning)
    Winke Responds:
    Corey, I wash them about every five times out (every 2 1/2 days). That is my outerwear. I try to wear fresh under garments each time out. I don't use any scents on my clothing at all. Good luck.
  • Dennis from AL asks:
    Bill, I have used the scent lock / blocker items for several years now. Honestly don't know if it works or not. Saw a T.V show Myth Busters that had a guy all dressed in a carbon type suit and hide. Then they had a hound dog track him down by scent. The dog was on a string right to where the guy was hiding. What is your opinion of this. All I can say there are many issues that come into play ... Thanks DENNIS
    Winke Responds:
    Dennis, I don't wear activated charcoal clothing at this time. I have tried it but never felt it helped me much. I may have been doing other things wrong so I can't say it was only the garments. I also saw a test done with dogs by a wildlife biologist in UT or ID. He proved the same thing: there didn't seem to be any measureable difference in the response of the dog to the guys garbed in carbon versus those not so garbed. The goal of eliminating odor is likely unrealistic. It makes more sense to work on reducing it and thus reducing the distance over which a deer can smell you. Other people's experiences my be different from mine, however, so take with a grain of salt. I have other thoughts, but I am going to keep them to myself at this time. I have done a lot of work in this area. If you go to the extremes you can do some impressive stuff. Short of going to the extremes it is all a compromise with comfort and effectiveness is lost. That is the bottom line - you trade effectiveness for comfort.
  • Brent from MI asks:
    Bill, what do you know about thermals and how they affect the dispertion of human odor. i've heard tons of rumors regarding thermals and how they push your scent upwards of a morning and downwards of an evening. can you set the record straight for me! as always....Thanks a ton in advance and best of luck to you!
    Winke Responds:
    Brent, Thermals only take over when the day winds are very week and the terrain is broken enough to create up and down drafts. When the area you are sitting is in the sun, the thermals will be rising. When it is the shade, the thermals will be falling. That is the easiest way to understand it. In the evenings, they tend to turn downward and remain that way until the sun warms the land the next morning. In mountainous areas, thermals are a big deal, however, as stated, here in the Midwest, day winds will take priority over thermals and will dictate where you should hunt. On still days, hunt thermals, otherwise hunt the forecasted day wind. Good luck.
  • william from PA asks:
    I have what my wife calls dragon breath. I am a diabetic and have gum disease and my breath stinks most of the time. When I go out in public I chew gum to hide my stinky breath should I do this while deer hunting and would the gum scent scare the deer away or not?
    Winke Responds:
    William, I am not convinced, despite all the press, that deer associate human breath odor with human scent. They are two different things coming from two different places. The breath odor is not related to the same factors as body odor. It is possible that deer have made that association, but I am not convinced of it. They aren't afraid of human spit, for example. I have spit in front of them on occassion and they just sniff it and walk off like it is nothing. I am not sure on that one. However, they would certainly smell spearmint, or whatever else you might try to sweeten your breath. You may just want to carry a few apples and munch on them through the day to help. That would be as good a bet as any. Good luck.
  • Jacob from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, I was just wondering if scent eliminator ever goes bad. I have a bottle of Primos Silver XP that I bought last year and wanted to make sure that it will still work properly.
    Winke Responds:
    Jacob, I don't believe the commercial formulas will go bad. It is possible that if you let them freeze they may not work as well if the chemical compound changes, but if you just store them inside during the offseason, I would expect them to keep working. Good luck.
  • mohammad ali from MI asks:
    hey bill why do you use scent killer spray if the wind will already spread your scent around your hunting area?
    Winke Responds:
    Mohammad, It will reduce your scent for any deer that slip past on the downwind side. In theory that shortens the distance over which they can detect you and will help to keep your hunting area fresher because deer a distance off won't smell you. It is very hard to eliminate your odor, but you do many things to reduce it.
  • Brandon from KS asks:
    Bill, would just like to pass along an item I have found at the megalomart. It is a Charcoal gel odor absober. Called "KEEP IT DRY CLOSET DEODERIZER". About 5 inches long 4 inches tall 1 inch wide.Located with the moth balls,cedar coat hangers etc. Very cheap about $4.00 each. I throw one in each of my totes, or storage bags that contain my hunting clothes and such. I even put one in the truck to keep the stink down.
    Winke Responds:
    Brandon, That is a good tip. Thanks for sharing that with us. For anyone interested, I looked up the company name (Willert) online and they show the product there. They don't sell it online so you are best off looking for at the big marts like Brandon did.
  • mark from MD asks:
    to pee or not to pee that is my question ? bill do you let the stream flow out of your treestand or do you carry something along to pee into
    Winke Responds:
    Mark, I let it flow. I have peed from my stands for 20 years and have never seen a single deer react negatively to it. No worries on that one - guaranteed.
  • Mike from ON asks:
    Bill I am obsessed with scent control and am always looking for new tricks. One thing I concern myself with during the hunting season is my diet. I try to stay away from spicy greasy foods (garlic, italian spices etc.)and strong meats. It can also be a problem to eat too much fibre or protein because of the chances of gas. What if anything do you change about your diet and what other scent control tricks do you know that are either underrated or not often thought of. I appreciate yor time and love your show keep up the great work. Mike
    Winke Responds:
    Mike, I don't change my diet, but I know some who only eat white meat in the fall. I do wear a garment I designed with Cabela's a few years ago (sold out and closed out - sorry none left) that bottles odors in better than anything else I have tried. Then all I do is keep that thing very, very clean and most of my worries are gone. A good trick, if you are lookig for ideas, is to wear a pair of PVC waders when scouting areas with lots of brush or tall grass to keep from leaving any scent. It works great. Elimitrax also works but is not as tall as the waders.
  • Scott from CT asks:
    Hi Bill! What are your thoughts on ground sent and how much do we leave behind while scouting, Even if we wear rubber boots sprayed with scent killer and don’t touch any vegetation. What are your thoughts on wearing chest waders for scouting? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Scott, If you wear rubber boots and spray them down and don't touch anything (which is very tough to do), you will leave little scent. There are always fibers and particles falling off your clothing that deer can smell, so it is hard to be 100 percent scentproof unless you do what you suggest in wearing a pair of PVC waders. I think that is a great idea. I do that occassionally myself. Good luck.
  • Brian from IA asks:
    Dear Bill, All year long I used scented bath soap, such as axe for old spice. Should I start to use an unscented soap during the hunting season, or can I continue to use these scented soaps during non hunting days? When I am going out to hunt I always take a scent free shower with scent-away, but I am wondering if it is ok to use scented soaps on the off days?
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I am not totally certain on that. My gut tells me that if you scrub well wtih a wash rag when using the unscented soaps, you will wash away all the residual odors from the scented soaps. However, it still makes sense to play it safe and stop using the scented soaps and shampoos at least a day or two before you start to hunt.
  • kent from IA asks:
    Bill, I am considering more scent control methods without buying carbon clothing. Have you used or know someone with experience with ozonics?
    Winke Responds:
    Kent, I have talked to a number of people who use them. They definitely work in certain applications. These units make the most sense when hunting from ground blinds and when used as a way to remove organic matter (scent molecules) from your clothing prior to the hunt. I don't have enough experience myself to know what will happen when using these units in a tree. It would seem tough to do a thorough job of mixing the ozone with your airborne scent when the wind is blowing.
  • Ryan from IN asks:
    hey bill great site bye the way i been watching for 2yrs now. ok my question is, what should i do with my boots when storing clothes? i have scentlok suit an fear that foot odor will contaminate clothes if i stored boots an clothes togather in a rubbermaid container. how do you go about this, just separate them?
    Winke Responds:
    I separate them in their own containers. I still don't like that altogether because I sometimes feel like I am bottling up the foot odor and totally contaminating the boots. Instead, it makes sense to get them out of the container when you get back to camp and let them air out in a place without any foreign odors (the front porch, for example). Good luck this fall.
  • Andrew from IL asks:
    I live on a farm in western Illinois and I absolutely love hunting whitetail deer. Being that I am only 17 and am very active in sports, I have a limited budget. I've always used a scent system ever since I started. We have a well that puts out sulfur water. Since it has a very rotten smell to it, could it be in my clothes etc even after I use a scent control wash? And also, could it even be staying on my body after a scent free body wash is used? Thanks for any suggestions.
    Winke Responds:
    Andrew, That is a tough one regarding your body odor, but I would certainly think it would be in your clothing. You can always run a dehumidifier and use the water from that to wash your clothing if you are looking for a pure, odorless source for water. Otherwise, it might be wise to wash them somewhere else. I would still definitely line dry them, however, to avoid dryer odors.
  • Brandon from KS asks:
    Bill, I'm Glad the season is just around the corner. Always enjoy the shows. My question is about scent. When traveling to and from your stand (and I guess as well as sitting on stand) How far do you think human scent wafts/drifts ? Of course the wind will push it further if it is strong on certain days. Just curious in general how far a hunter should be concerned about how far thier scent is drifting. I have some stands that are hard to get into, and I have to pretty much come in from one direction. The scent blowing into the hunting area always concerns me.
    Winke Responds:
    Brandon, I don't have any testing on this, but I read a couple of studies by other guys over the years that suggests that a deer can smell you to a distance of at least 1/4 mile if you don't take any odor elimination steps and the conditions are correct. The best scenting conditions are a light breeze, steady with moderate to high humidity. This takes in most hunting conditions. If you think in terms of 1/4 mile you will probably be on target. Each thing you do to reduce your odor will reduce that distance. Good luck.
  • Brian from IA asks:
    Bill, What cover scent would you suggest to use? I would like to buy a product that provides everything from washing and drying clothes to elimanating scent right before entering the tree. What would you suggest?
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, I think both Hunter Specialties, Wildlife Research Center and Scent Blocker all make good systems. Any one of them will work. I am a sticker for avoiding odors, of course, and I have noticed that many odors enter clothing in the dryer. Even if all you use the dryer for is to dry hunting clothes with no softener sheets, they still tend to produce and odor. Just sniff the exhaust coming from the dryer vent sometime and you'll know what I mean. So hanging the clothing dry is a very good idea. I don't personally use cover scents. I sometimes walk in cowpies when crossing pastures, but most of the "ground scent" that deer pick up they find above the ground - on low brush and vegetation that your cloting contacts. That is why I always wear Elimitrax boots when walking through areas where contact with vegetation is unavoidable. Take everything to the extreme. If you don't, you may as well not even do anything. Good luck.
  • dylan from IN asks:
    how much of a factor is scent lock? i dont have scent lock suits or anything of the sort. i try and play the wind but not always. i do make sure to stay as scent free as best i can with all the different products.
    Winke Responds:
    Dylan, It does reduce scent to some degree. Exactly how much it reduces the scent is debatable. You will still need to play the wind at all times even with the scent clothing.
  • Alex from OH asks:
    Hey Mr. Winke, I've hunted this 400 acre farm my friend owns for the past two years. He has Cattle on this farm they are separated from where my stands are located but are close to it. I was wondering if I stepped in Cow manure would it help to mask my scent while I'm walking to my stand? Thanks, Alex
    Winke Responds:
    Alex, Yes, that is a good thing to do, but don't forget that most of the "ground" scent that deer pick up is in the places where your pant legs brush against the low vegetation. So the manure cover scent is only part of the challenge of getting in clean. You still need to avoid contacting vegetation. That is the hardest part. I have gone to great lengths in some areas to keep my clothing from touching vegetaion. I like to use Elimitrax boots and I also have even used PVC waders in some cases, to get in clean. It is a lot of trouble to be sure, but that is sometimes the price you pay for getting into a tough stand without leaving any scent.
  • Eric from NY asks:
    Hi Bill, Last fall you mentioned you might come out with another version of the scent control suit you wear. Are you still thinking about doing so? I'm curious if the material is as quiet as a fleece type garment or how it compares for wind and water protection too. Thanks, love the show.
    Winke Responds:
    Eric, Thanks. We had plans to bring it out but had trouble with the material. We still hope to have a few by fall, but don't hold your breath. I will let everyone on the site know about it when we get them ready.
  • Tye from AL asks:
    Bill; a stand I’m looking at hunting on public land has great creek access routes for entry and exit, but the creeks don’t line up well with the best wind direction for the stand I plan to hunt. Can the creek act as enough of a wind break to allow entry/exit with not so ideal winds, or is wind still the determining factor on entry/exit? This situation for example has the creek running North/South, but the stand needs a westerly wind and is blocked by private ground on the east side ending any hope of approaching from that direction. The creek is deep and narrow and blocks the wind, but can thermals moving my scent up into the wind stream still be a concern?
    Winke Responds:
    Tye, The creek will shield the wind from you, but ultimately it will swirl around some in the creek and eventually end up blowing out and will be detected by any deer in the downwind direction. I would try it on still days (or days with low winds that aren't as likely to gust and swirl violently). It will probably work fine under those conditions. Good luck.
  • jeff lemon from OH asks:
    didnt you and cabelas team up to make a pair of coverall that were lined with some material and were suppose to keep your scent contained i still have one and like it wondered what your thoughts on it and wether you still liked it or have you come up with something better
    Winke Responds:
    Jeff, I am still using that suit myself. That is part of the reason I don't have a clothing sponsor because I don't want to have to wear something else. I am working with another company to come back out with a similar product. I'll keep you updated when we have it ready.
  • Steve from MO asks:
    Bill, What are your thoughts concerning eliminating ground scent entering and exiting stands? It's obviously best to not cross known trails but just in case, what do you think works best? Do you think spraying down your rubber boots and clothes heavily with some sort of scent eliminating spray is sufficient? Any thoughts on the Elimitrax boots as to whether they are worthwhile? I personally like them but if you are going through any brush they sure are noisy. Thanks, Steve
    Winke Responds:
    Steve, I am a big fan of the Elimitrax boots. I think they do exactly what I need them to do. It is hard to make clothing so scent-free that the deer can't smell where you brushed against the vegetation. If you really want to get in clean, consider a pair of PVC waders and carry your boots. I have done this in sensitive areas and it works incredibly well.
  • Jarred from OH asks:
    You've mentioned several times that you use the suit developed for Cabela's several years back. If memoery serves me, it wasn't carbon activated. How did it block your scent. Do you not feel carbon works as advertised. Also are you making a new version of the old suit. Thanks producing a great show, I have picked up some really nice pointers. Jarred
    Winke Responds:
    Jarred, You know how to pin a poor guy down don't you? I am not going to answer all those questions because they are too loaded. I think some of that carbon technology works, but it never worked for me as well as I would have liked. That is all I am willing to say about that. I will likely come out with another scent suit next summer. Now I have a way to promote it through the show. The two I have left are getting ratty and it is time for me to replace them so I had better get back to work and find a manufacturer! Thanks for your support. We will try to add some information in every show to help you become a better deer hunter. That is my goal. Good luck.
  • Frank from PA asks:
    I have a question for you, does the scent blocker and scent lok clothing really work or do they just fake? If they do work which one should I buy?
    Winke Responds:
    Frank, I think they both work to a certain extent. I don't wear either one because I have something I like better that is no longer being sold, unfortunately. I would select the suit you can afford and the one that fits you most comfortably. Certain features might also be important to you. I would not worry too much about comparing the two on effectiveness. I don't have a good answer for you there.
  • Aaron from ME asks:
    Winke, One of the best forms of scent elimination I've found, although somewhat unconventional, is having my wife save her urine. Before I dress in the morning, I rub it all over me and then before I head out to my stand, I pour some more on my head and let it drip down me. I really have never been detected since I started doing this. Have you ever heard of this? Do you think I could sell her urine and advertise it as a scent eliminator? Thank you, Aaron
    Winke Responds:
    Aaron, I have heard it all now!! I thought I had lived an open, full life, exposed to many new ideas in the hunting world, but apparently I have been sheltered because that one took me by surprise. I know of a guy out in Colorado that rolls in elk wallows (he's head to toe mud and elk piss when he's done) and then he just walks right into the herd. Maybe you guys can get together and start a company.
  • Justin from AL asks:
    I have been using dead down wind and scent killer scent eliminator sprays (plus clothes wash and body shampoo before the hunt) to stay scent free in the woods. It seems like I've used a ton of scent eliminator field spray this year. Do you need to apply it every time you enter the woods, or does it keep working for a while; for example could I put it on in the morning and not need to apply it again that afternoon (even though I'd be wearing the clothes home and then leaving them in the car)? Thanks Bill and good luck as you get started with your hunting on the 25th.
    Winke Responds:
    Justin, Some of those sprays have active ingredients that will continue to work well after you spray them on. I would say that if you are coating your clothing well, doing so once per day should be enough. I wouldn't wear them in the vehicle at all. There is just so much odor, dust, etc. in the seats of vehicles that you will surely contaminate them quickly wearing them in the vehicle. It would be better to keep them in a scent proof bag and get them off as soon as you arrive back at the vehicle. I look pretty crazy dancing around in my longies all the time, but hey, it keeps the odors off my clothing.
  • scott from OH asks:
    Bill, why don't you find someone new to manufacture your Winke Super Suit? I am still kicking myself for not buying one 5 years ago. I would think they would sell much better today since you have the website where people can actually see the success you have while wearing it. Thanks again for this great resource. Scott
    Winke Responds:
    Scott, Yes, that is what I am doing. I expect to have something like that next year. My suits are getting tattered from barb-wire and brambles so it is definitely time for new ones. There was a personnel change at Cabela's the year after the suit came out and the new guy didn't like the suit or me so he dumped it. In his defense, they weren't selling great, but they are not mainstream clothing - a little clunky. With a little time, I think they would have caught on. Once he decided to close them out, I should have bought 20 of them in my size! I bought a couple (you would think with my name on it they would give them to me, but like I said, the guy didn't like me.) So here I sit with tattered clothes.
  • levi from IL asks:
    Bill, Do You Like Scent Lok Or Scent Bloker Better?
    Winke Responds:
    Levi, I don't use either one of them right now. I still use a suit I developed with Cabela's back in 2004. That one didn't do well for various reasons, but it does work very well. Mine are wearing out so I am going to have to get off my butt and come up with something else. Good luck.
  • Casey from MN asks:
    Hey Bill, great show you guys at MW put on. I love the authentic hunts and family atmoshere. Keep it up. The property I bow hunt has great potential as I have some great deer on my trail camera. The terrain is lower oak flats and river bottom surrounded by cropland and hayfields. The problem I have is finding stands where the prevailing wind doesn't blow my scent to the deer. I've read your comments about a special scentlock suit you helped develop but this can't completely eliminate your scent, does it? I've never been big on the scentlock suits and such and always try to play the wind but it seems I'm missing out on some great deer and/or just plan educating them. Is there anytime you ignore the wind and just hunt? Also what is your scent elimination routine? Thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Casey, To answer your question in simple terms, no, I never forget the wind and just hunt. I'm sure that is a catching marketing phrase, but I would never do that. Instead, play the wind as best you can and then use the best scent control possible to help you get away with a bit of error. One possibility is a scent proof ground blind. I have hunted in blinds that completely contained my scent. Just make sure it is essentially air tight (you can always open the door occassionally to get some fresh air inside. I use cellophane wrap (Reynolds) across the windows and then shoot through that. Getting to and from the blind may still be a problem, but on stand (in the blind) you should be able to stay basically undetected.
  • Dean from NJ asks:
    Hi Bill, love the shows! Since I have seen on the shows that sometimes you set up your stand when you go into the woods to hunt it, my question is, how do you deal with your scent? I know sometimes when I set up a stand sometimes I can get a sweat going and I know that can not be good for scent control. Any ideas? Thanks!
    Winke Responds:
    Dean, I just take my lumps and sweat. There isn't much else I can do unless I bring a change of clothes in a rubber canoe bag (I have done this before). However, I'm always playing the wind anyway and wear a suit that I developed back in 2004 for Cabela's. They stopped making it but I bought several before they quit and that is what I still wear. That suit basically works regardless of what I smell like.
  • Tim from IL asks:
    I guess I don't understand your reply on onions being introduced as new , because here in Illinois if you look around wood lot openings and edge's of timber there is wild onions growing abound, that is where I got the idea on using something natural to the deer but yet strong enough to cover our smell if you put them around your setup... can you have your show do a study on this and compare in different area's ...you know sometimes idea's so silly and simple could be with awesome results... Thank You Tim
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, If they are natural, then it would work. We don't have them in my area and I have not seen them often when traveling other places to hunt so I assumed they were not part of the natural landscape. I think that would be an interesting study. Thanks for the heads-up.
  • Brian from PA asks:
    Dear Bill, I have been using one of your scent suits for a number of years.....works great!!! I seem to remember reading somewhere that you also use some sort of swimmers cap for your head, and cover your daypack in one as well? Any thoughts would be very much appreciated.
    Winke Responds:
    Brian, Actually, it is my friend Jim Hill that wore the swimmer's hat. He used a neoprene swimmer's hat. I never went to that extent but do where the head cover that came with the suit. Sadly, Cabela's had only limited success with the suit and stopped selling it so now I need to figure out what I am going to do to get more of them. I put my pack in a PVC canoe bag when in the tree. I wear just a small fanny pack and the bag, rolled up, fits easily into the pack with the other items I carry.
  • Tim from IL asks:
    What do you think about onion"s for cover up ? Any research on this ? Your show's are awesome thanks
    Winke Responds:
    Tim, That one was not on my radar. I had never thought of that and probably wouldn't do it. Deer don't like new stuff and that is defintitely an odor they would not be accustomed too. So even if it did effectively cover human scent, it would introduce too much of an unfamiliar odor to suit me.
  • Matt from IA asks:
    Love the show Bill. Been following it since last year on Realtree's site. Keep up the good work. My question is this...do you think a natural smell like a campfire would work as a good cover scent or would it spook deer. Thanks.
    Winke Responds:
    Matt, I think it would work. I would keep everything really clean, but if you feel that you need a cover scent, hanging the clothing and accessories above a smoky fire would definitely help. Good luck and thanks for supporting the show.
  • Brandon from KS asks:
    Bill, Love the shows! Last year I got in about mid season, and was really looking forward to the launch of this season. Was wondering what your thoughts are on the carbon scent control clothing ? Do you use any of this type hunting clothing ? Thanks Brandon.
    Winke Responds:
    Brandon, I still wear the suit I designed for Cabela's back in 2004! I thought enough of them that I actually purchased several of them when they were closing them out over the last couple of years. That is the most effective product I have tried, but unfortunately it is no longer available. Maybe I will try to come out with something along those lines again. Anything helps as long as you keep it very clean. It is just that some things work better than others. Keep that stuff clean and it will definitely help.
  • Bunky from VA asks:
    Bow Hoist Rope Bill, When you use a hoist rope do you put it away or leave it out? Do you think the rope or strap material would hold human scent longer than the metal steps? I was planing on putting a rope at each stand but I thought maybe I should use one and carry it up the tree and take it with me when I leave so I don't leave a rope low to the ground with scent on it. What's your approach on this?
    Winke Responds:
    I leave one at each stand. It will go scent-free soon enough. I think if you are going to be putting the stand up during the season, it would probably be a good idea to take the rope with you. However, if you use a heavily padded seat on your stand, it probably contains a fair amount of scent too. I started taking the cushions off. Not nearly as comfortable, but much less scent. Good question.
  • Elwin Page from ME asks:
    I was just wondering about your bow and arrows. Do u spray anythink on them for the human scent that gets on them from and if u do what is it that u like to use. Thank you Elwin
    Winke Responds:
    Elwin, I definitely spray my bow and arrows regularly. I use typical scent sprays. I think I used Scent Killer last year.
  • kade from IA asks:
    I want to take my girlfriend out with me hunting but im afraid she might get too cold. Im going to set a ground blind up on a picked corn field. My questions is if I run a propane heater would deer be able to smell it?
    Winke Responds:
    Kade, Yes, they they can smell propane fumes for sure, but the nice thing about heat - it rises. And it takes your scent up with it. We have seen this before. If you have a small outlet for the hot air to get out of the blind, the heat and odor will rise a good ways before cooling and moving with the airflow. I think it is a great idea.
  • Jonathan from MN asks:
    Hi Bill, I just read your recent jounral enteries on your experiments with scent control(I really enjoyed the read).After reading the article it got me wondering what is your current scent contral system.I see that you are not wearing scent control hoods on your video footage. Are you just keeping clean and watching the wind or do you have some kind of scent reduction or elimination system that you use? I have been wearing scent lock and keeping everything clean and scent free for the last 10 years or so with fairly good results just wondering if there is anything else I can do to up my odds of staying undetected.Thanks for your time and the example you are to all of us. I really enjoyed meeting you at the MN Deer Classic you are obviously a man of good moral character and I appreciate the fact that you include your family in your work and are not scared to mention the fact that you are actively involved in your local church. God Bless, Jonathan
    Winke Responds:
    Jonathan, Several years ago I came up with a coverall based on my findings with the waders, etc. I applied for a patent and took the idea to Cabela's. They developed the concept into a garment and they sold it for one year. It didn't fly off the shelves so they abandoned it. I was hoping they would promote it, but they had/have a lot of relationships with activated charcoal companies so it wasn't in their best interest to throw money at that and risk alienating their core business of charcoal. So it died. I ended up with a few sets of that coverall and that is what I wear. The facemask you see me wearing, is actually part of that suit. Someday I will likely come out another version, but for now, I still wearing the ones from the Cabela's days. Thanks for your comments. I appreciate your support. Best regards. Bill